DARPA

DARPA seeks an implantable ‘travel adapter’ for soldiers’ bodies

DARPA seeks an implantable ‘travel adapter’ for soldiers’ bodies

Military research agency DARPA has announced a new program that seeks a 'travel adapter' designed for the human body. The device, as with other DARPA projects, is intended for potential use with military personnel, helping them overcome common problems on the battlefield and beyond. In this case, the 'travel adapter' would help reduce jet lag and protect against illness caused by foreign food and water sources.

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DARPA inks deal with private company to develop satellite-fixing space robot

DARPA inks deal with private company to develop satellite-fixing space robot

DARPA has revealed the partner that will work with it on developing 'advanced robotic capabilities in space.' The project aims to deploy a space robot that will be able to fix and improve US satellites that are already in orbit. The work is being performed under DARPA's Robotic Servicing of Geosynchronous Satellites (RSGS) program; the development of the robot is described as the first step in the program.

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DARPA taps four companies for critical unmanned underwater vehicle tech

DARPA taps four companies for critical unmanned underwater vehicle tech

DARPA has announced the four companies it has selected to work under its Manta Ray Program. Three of the companies will be tasked with developing 'an integrated solution' for the program's operational and technology areas, according to DARPA. The fourth company will instead focus on the topic of undersea energy harvesting options capable of working at the depths DARPA has planned.

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DARPA-backed living bricks could reproduce, self-heal, and slurp CO2

DARPA-backed living bricks could reproduce, self-heal, and slurp CO2

Researchers have discovered a method with which they're able to create living bricks that turn carbon dioxide into CaCO3, the main ingredient for cement. Studies with Synechococcus cyanobacteria (we'll just refer to it as bacteria from here on out) showed great potential for future building projects when used in combination with sand, carbon dioxide, and a specific range of humidity conditions. Cutting the resulting bricks results in self-healing and reproduction.

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DARPA project seeks bacteria that can detect hidden bombs

DARPA project seeks bacteria that can detect hidden bombs

Raytheon has announced that it is working with DARPA on a project for detecting buried explosives using a unique method: bacteria. The work is taking place under a contract from the agency; Worcester Polytechnic Institute joins Raytheon in 'programming' two different bacteria strains to detect bombs located underground.

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DARPA seeks psychedelic drugs that don’t cause hallucinations

DARPA seeks psychedelic drugs that don’t cause hallucinations

The government research agency DARPA has announced a new program called Focused Pharma that seeks drug innovations that offer the mental health benefits of psychedelics without the 'significant side effects.' The agency detailed its new program earlier this week, revealing that it has reviewed the growing body of private research on the potential benefits of psychedelics like LSD and psilocybin.

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DARPA Subterranean Challenge kicks off tomorrow

DARPA Subterranean Challenge kicks off tomorrow

DARPA is hosting its DARPA Subterranean Challenge Systems Competition this week. The challenge runs August 15 to 22 and is being held in mining tunnels under Pittsburgh. Among the teams from around the world participating in the event will be a NASA JPL team that has wheeled rovers, drones, and climbing robots that can scale obstacles.

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Atlas and Valkyrie robots navigate rough terrain thanks to IHMC software

Atlas and Valkyrie robots navigate rough terrain thanks to IHMC software

When people talk about robots taking over humans' jobs, they're mostly talking about those robots that come in incorporeal, digital-only form. It's going to be a very long while before humanoid or even bipedal robot can pose a fictional threat to humans. They can't even walk on uneven terrain without toppling over. That has been one of the challenges of DARPA's contests and IHMC Robotics may have developed a way for the likes of Atlas and Valkyrie to learn how to step through treacherous land.

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Pentagon earmarks up to $2 billion for new advanced AI programs

Pentagon earmarks up to $2 billion for new advanced AI programs

The Department of Defense has vowed to spend $2 billion on artificial intelligence projects over the next half-decade. The program will focus on advancing the nation's AI capabilities, primarily involving the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, more commonly called DARPA. The agency's director Steven Walker revealed the new plan today.

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DARPA AIE program will explore AI for problem-solving machines

DARPA AIE program will explore AI for problem-solving machines

DAPRA has announced a new program called Artificial Intelligence Exploration (AIE) that aims to surface new AI concepts at a faster pace than competing efforts elsewhere. The overall goal of the project is to ensure the US maintains an advantage when it comes to artificial intelligence technologies. The program will involve a series of "regular and relatively short-term technology development projects," according to DARPA Deputy Director Peter Highnam.

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DARPA Biostasis seeks to slow biological time for battlefield survival

DARPA Biostasis seeks to slow biological time for battlefield survival

DARPA's latest research project is focusing on slowing down time, at least when it comes to biochemical reactions. The new Biostasis program seeks ways to extend a period time known as the golden hour -- that is, the duration of time between the onset of an infection or an injury and the time when treatment is given. By extending that period of time and applying the technology to the battlefield, medical facilities may be able to save soldiers' lives.

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A robot just landed a Boeing 737, in a simulator of course

A robot just landed a Boeing 737, in a simulator of course

Airline pilots beware! Yours might be the next job in line to be replaced by robots. Well, maybe not yet soon. In the future, however, robots might indeed take over some tasks deemed either too menial or too distracting for humans. For now, however, DARPA's ALIAS robot, short for Aircrew Labor In-Cockpit Automation System, is content to be a co-pilot and trainer. And to prove its flying chops, it successfully landed a passenger plane. Well, a simulated Boeing 737 cockpit, to be precise.

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