Porsche increases the electric driving range for Cayenne E-Hybrid range

Shane McGlaun - Oct 30, 2020, 6:42am CDT
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Porsche increases the electric driving range for Cayenne E-Hybrid range

Porsche has announced that it has increased the high-voltage battery’s gross capacity in its plug-in Cayenne hybrid models. The battery pack is now 17.9 kWh rather than 14.1 kWh, representing an increase in range of up to 30 percent. Using the WLTP EAER City cycle, the E-Hybrid can now cover up to 48 kilometers on electricity alone.

The Turbo S E-Hybrid has an all-electric driving range of 42 kilometers. Reports note that all Cayenne E-Hybrid models meet the current range criteria entitling owners to an “E” number plate and reduced company car tax in Germany. The hybrid system used in all of the E-Hybrid Cayenne models features an electric motor integrated into the eight-speed Tiptronic S automatic transmission.

The powertrain delivers 100 kW and 400 Nm of torque. The vehicle can reach a top speed of 135 KM/H on electricity alone. Any increased power demand by the driver or switching to Sport or Sport Plus driving modes will activate the internal combustion engine in all models. The Cayenne E-Hybrid uses a 3.0-liter turbo V6 making 250 kW giving the vehicle a 340 kW total.

The Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid has a 404 kW 4.0-liter twin-turbo V-8 for a combined power of 500 kW. Porsche optimized the driving modes of the standard Sport Chrono Package to increase efficiency and performance. In E-Charge mode, the internal combustion engine charges the battery via load point shifting during travel.

The charging strategy was changed, so in E-Charge mode, the target state to charge the battery is now 80 percent rather than 100 percent. This is because batteries charge more slowly and inefficiently when the state of charge reaches approximately 80 percent or more. The vehicle also features intelligent charging with the Porsche Mobile Charger Connect. Some models come with up to 7.2 kW charging. Using a Mode 3 charge cable, the vehicle can charge at public charging stations.


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