OnePlus 8T durability and display benchmark results are unsurprising

JC Torres - Oct 15, 2020, 1:06am CDT
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OnePlus 8T durability and display benchmark results are unsurprising

OnePlus, sans co-founder Carl Pei, has just announced its second and last high-end flagship of the year. The OnePlus 8T changes the company’s formula in more ways than one, launching without a “Pro” sibling but incorporating Pro features at the same time. It will definitely pique consumers’ interests, especially on whether now is the right time to grab one. These early tests do seem encouraging but JerryRigEverything’s Zack Nelson seems to be on the fence but not for reasons you might think.

There are some ways that the OnePlus 8T significantly differs from its predecessors, like the camera design on the back and the flat screen on the front. The dual batteries to support its 65W warp charging are yet another selling point as well as the 120Hz screen refresh rate previously available only on the OnePlus 8 Pro.

The OnePlus 8T is also mighty strong, unlike the OnePlus 7T last year. That may be due to the new camera bump design that doesn’t leave a large hole in the middle of the rear glass. Its rear, however, does lift up a bit but nothing that compromises the phone’s overall durability.

The OnePlus 8T also gets an A+ rating from the experts over at DisplayMate, but it’s not uncommon for them to hand out these scores to almost every high-end phone they test. It does, at least, inspire confidence in the screen’s quality, presuming it doesn’t fall victim to tinting and touch issues that OnePlus phones have become rather notorious for.

Nelson’s qualms, however, aren’t based on any technical concern or question, other than the accuracy of the under-display fingerprint scanner. They are, instead, based more on the practicality of jumping on every new phone model that comes our way, especially if the manufacturer puts out two phones a year. If, on the other hand, you’re up for an upgrade anyway, the OnePlus 8T’s $750 price tag definitely makes it sound more enticing and it will not exhibit the same display problems of its kin.


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