Nissan aims for carbon neutrality by 2050

Shane McGlaun - Jan 31, 2021, 10:59am CST
Nissan aims for carbon neutrality by 2050

Nissan Motor Co. has set an ambitious goal to reach carbon neutrality across its operations and the lifecycle of its products by 2050. As part of the effort, by the early 2030s, every all-new Nissan vehicle offering in key markets will be electrified. Nissan says that it will also pursue innovations in electrification and manufacturing technology to help meet its carbon neutrality goal.

Innovations will happen in batteries, including solid-state and related technologies to develop cost-competitive and more efficient electric vehicles. Nissan will further develop its e-POWER electrified powertrain for more efficiency. Nissan will also develop a better ecosystem supporting a decentralized on-site power generation system for buildings using renewable energy sources.

The automaker says it anticipates increased collaboration with the energy sector to support the decarbonization of power grids. Nissan intends to invest in manufacturing process innovations to support increased productivity during vehicle assembly. Nissan has for decades had a program to reduce emissions and provide electric vehicle technologies to help society and the environment.

The automaker’s electrification and emissions reduction efforts also support the UN Paris Agreement’s goals on climate change and global progress towards carbon neutrality by 2050. Nissan says 100 percent of all-new vehicle offerings will be electrified in Japan, China, the US, and Europe by the early 2030s.

Nissan is also set a goal to be among the leaders driving the adoption of electric vehicle technology. Solid-state batteries, in particular, hold the promise to significantly change the electric vehicle market with longer driving ranges and significantly faster charge times. Once automakers can address driving range and charge speed, electric vehicles will go more mainstream. The price of electric vehicle technology is also coming down, getting the vehicles closer in price with traditional combustion engine vehicles.


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