Google Meet free users no longer get unlimited group video calls

Brittany A. Roston - Jul 13, 2021, 6:14pm CDT
Google Meet free users no longer get unlimited group video calls

All good things come to an end eventually and Google Meet’s unlimited group video calls for free users is no exception. Now that many countries are slowly returning to normal with widespread vaccination availability, last year’s unprecedented remote working arrangement is decreasing, many people are getting together in person again, and the need for such software is decreasing.

Google Meet is, to put it simply, like Google’s version of Zoom; you can use the software to create and join video calls with other people, including group calls. Such software proved immensely valuable last year as huge numbers of people were restricted to their homes. The software and others like it were used to connect with friends, work remotely, and attend virtual classes.

Google made its Meet software available to the general public last April, also offering unlimited group video call access to free users. Initially, Google had said it would make the unlimited calls available for these users until September, but then later extended the deadline to March and then, finally, to the end of June.

That latter date turned out to be the official one. Google Meet users who have a free account are now limited to group video calls at up to an hour in length. To get a longer duration, you’ll need to sign up for a subscription priced at $7.99/month. Otherwise, there are alternative platforms available that offer longer-duration video group chats for free, but it may be harder to get everyone you know on board with the same software.

As the image above shows, Google Meet free users are still offered unlimited video calls that involve only one other user, as well as an unlimited number of meetings. Many other features are also available to free users, including live captions, adjustable layouts, and the ability to join a meeting with a web browser. Other features are limited to subscribers, however, such as dial-in numbers and breakout rooms.

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