Facebook’s latest experiment is Venue, a second screen for live events

Brittany A. Roston - May 29, 2020, 5:25 pm CDT
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Facebook’s latest experiment is Venue, a second screen for live events

Facebook’s experimental team has released yet another app, this one for both iOS and Android devices. Called Venue, the app is intended to help fans experience live events in a new way, according to Facebook, bringing people together alongside expert commentators as hosts. Venue is a third-party app that can be used to augment an existing live event — and it’ll kick off this weekend with the NASCAR race on Sunday.

Venue comes from the New Product Experimentation (NPE) Team at Facebook. Unlike its recently launched CatchUp app, Venue has been launched for both iOS and Android, making it available to a greater number of people. As with any NPE Team product, it is possible that Facebook will scrap Venue at some point, depending on how popular it proves to be.

Facebook describes Venue as offering a second screen experience that brings fans together despite their distance from each other. The community participating in the event can get highlights from the most notable moments, as well as curated content from experts. Facebook presents Venue as a particularly useful app in light of the fact that large groups of people are still barred from gathering for events.

The app will be used this weekend with the NASCAR race, enabling fans to come together and be able to connect with each other using Venue. NASCAR SVP and Chief Digital Officer Tim Clark said, “NASCAR was built on innovation, and we couldn’t be more excited to help a great partner like Facebook’s New Product Experimentation team innovate around new platforms.”

Venue can be used by hosts to post polls and questions, enable chatting among the community, offer commentary, and similar activities. Users can browse a feed of current and upcoming events, including future NASCAR races. Venue hosts for these upcoming races will include Landon Cassill, a NASCAR driver, as well as Alan Cavanna, a NASCAR reporter for FOX Sports.


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