Zynga CEO Don Mattrick makes changes, three executives to leave says sources

Aug 13, 2013
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Zynga CEO Don Mattrick makes changes, three executives to leave says sources

Earlier this summer, Zynga's previous CEO stepped down to make way for former Microsoft executive Don Mattrick, who has the substantial task of pulling the company from its dregs. As part of that task, Mattrick has reportedly made some restructuring changes and as a result three top executives will be resigning and leaving the company.

According to the sources, the three individuals who have reportedly planned to resign are Chief Operating Officer David Ko, Chief Technology Officer Cadir Lee, and the Chief People Officer Colleen McCreary. Once resigned, the three individuals will then leave the company rather than assume different positions.

Says the same sources, Don Mattrick will announce this later today in an official statement, but for now it remains the stuff of rumors. Such a change wouldn't be surprising, however, considering some statements Mattrick made during the company's latest call with investors. Said Mattrick at the time, "We anticipate two to four quarters of volatility as we work through resetting and developing our strategy for growing topline revenue and profit. I’ll be detailing more of this in coming calls and look forward to keeping you up to date on our progress."

This follows a report that surfaced late last month stating that three top executives had resigned, all of them leaving for greener pastures. Those individuals were reportedly Senior Vice President of Games John Osvald, Vice President of Zynga's Casino Division Jesse Janosov, and Vice President of Games Nathan Etter.

Zynga has experienced more than its fair share of trouble over the past months, having started back in late 2011 when it made its IPO. A slow decline rendered the company from once-top maker of Facebook games to a company that has seen layoffs and rocky times. In recent weeks, the company announced the closure of OMGPOP.com and a few related games.

SOURCE: Ars Technica


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