technology

Man injects Bitcoin wallet NFC chips into his hands

Man injects Bitcoin wallet NFC chips into his hands

Chalk this one up to sounding both a little crazy and a little brilliant. 10 days ago, a Dutch man had a NFC chip implanted into each of his hands to serve as storage for the encrypted key to his Bitcoin cold storage. Keeping one's Bitcoins offline, and in this case in the body, makes it harder for them to be hacked and stolen, but Martijn Wismeijer is already thinking ahead for other uses for his chipped hands.

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Cyclists now have their own glow in the dark road

Cyclists now have their own glow in the dark road

The Netherlands seems to have a fascination with things that glow in the dark. Just after completing the "smart highway", a.k.a. highway N329 in Oss with glow in the dark road paint, designer Daan Roosegaarde is at it again, this time in Nuenen, to shed some light on a bike path during the night. It uses the same technology but applied on a smaller scale and with more styling this time around. The effect is both enchanting and slightly disturbing, which perhaps presents a predicament to cyclists in the area.

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“Transparent cockpit” AR could fix driver blind spots

“Transparent cockpit” AR could fix driver blind spots

Who says augmented reality is just for games or entertainment? The same ideas and technologies that allows us to superimpose virtual images onto real objects in almost realistic fashion could very well save lives in the future. Take, for example, this "transparent car" concept from researchers from Keio University in Japan, a system that could potentially work around drivers' blind spots, letting them see crucial information that are otherwise occluded to them by doors, windows, ceilings or floors, giving them the details that they need to make that life-saving decision.

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Don’t Move tags stick to anything and alert if disturbed

Don’t Move tags stick to anything and alert if disturbed

Living in shared accommodations can be a hassle, as can working in an office or any other number of situations where people are prone to getting in your stuff. There are tricks to determine if something has been tampered with: tape over a drawer seam, a penny precariously balanced on an edge. They're archaic and not terribly accurate, among other things, and now fully obsolete thanks to the roster of connected devices that abound. The "Don't Move" Bluetooth tags, a new product being funded on Indiegogo, may stand chief among them all.

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Kyocera Proteus aims to be a bendable, wearable smartphone

Kyocera Proteus aims to be a bendable, wearable smartphone

When it comes to flexible displays, Samsung and LG have taken much of the spotlight, employing those latest techniques for a variety of its products, from curved TVs to smartphones. However, that doesn't mean that other technology companies are taking a backseat. Kyocera, more known in the mobile world for its tough, rugged, and unbending smartphones, is taking a stab at it too. At this year's CEATEC, it revealed its Kyocera Proteus beta designs. Named after the shape-shifting sea god, you can very well guess what this smartphone wants to become.

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Scientists develop “decoder” that transcribes thoughts

Scientists develop “decoder” that transcribes thoughts

Not much in this world is private any more, but your thoughts -- specifically the ones you think but don't speak -- are the one thing you can be certain stays private. That certainty mightn't be so strong in the future, however, with a team a researchers revealing that they've successfully decoded volunteers' unspoken thoughts. The work was done by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, who hope the technology can one day be used to give a voice to individuals who aren't able to speak.

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Samsung video explains why it’s so hyped about 5G

Samsung video explains why it’s so hyped about 5G

South Korea hasn't been one to settle on a network technology for too long. Even while the rest of the world is still migrating towards and heavily marketing 4G, companies and engineers already have their sights on the next generation, 5G. Samsung, unsurprisingly, is one of the biggest proponents of that technology, considering a good bulk of its business revolves around devices that connect to the Internet. Now it has released a video showing why you should be excited about it too. And no, it's isn't about eliminating YouTube buffering.

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Virtual Pong replaces the ball with an orb of light

Virtual Pong replaces the ball with an orb of light

Pong has aged nicely over the years, growing from that game you played with two bland paddles to its latest virtual iteration, Virtual Pong. Dubbed such by Shaper Image, this real-world version of the game ushers in a digital projected ball and two wireless paddles for hitting it, allowing players to get off the couch and compete face to face without the hassle of losing the ball or compensating for gravity. Essentially, and somewhat futuristically, it is indoor tennis played with light.

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Dashboard tech the worst part of car ownership says Consumer Reports

Dashboard tech the worst part of car ownership says Consumer Reports

Complex, confusing, and frustrating car dashboards are now the most disappointing part of car ownership, a new survey suggests, with wonky infotainment coming in for renewed criticism from owners. Navigation, multimedia, and social networking features are spreading across many new vehicles, but lackluster user experiences - especially in brand new systems - are not only driving owners crazy but having a meaningful impact on their overall ratings.

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New microscope rapidly captures molecules, cells in high-def

New microscope rapidly captures molecules, cells in high-def

When Eric Betzig shared the Nobel Prize in chemistry a few weeks ago, little did the world know that he was already in the middle of cooking up yet another award-worthy development. After his PALM microscope, Betzig is now taking the biology world by storm again with a new lattice light microscope. This microscope is not only able to capture high resolution images of molecules and cells, it can do so rapidly and in complete three dimensions. And all these while minimizing damage to the cells being photographed.

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