technology

Freevolt uses ubiquitous radio signals to charge IoT devices

Freevolt uses ubiquitous radio signals to charge IoT devices

A lot of attention these days is being lavished on batteries and charging, mostly because of how much we seem to be doing that every day. We're always on the lookout for better ways to power our devices, from improvements in the batteries themselves to alternative ways of charging. While the magical "charging from thin air" is still a far ways off, the technology that can pull not a rabbit but electrical energy from thin air enough to power senors might just be around the corner if Drayson Technologies' Freevolt is to be believed.

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Smart glove translates sign language into speech, text

Smart glove translates sign language into speech, text

Saudi designer Hadeel Ayoub has developed the “SignLanguageGlove”, a so-called smart glove that wirelessly translates sign language as it is signed, doing so into speech or visual letters for those on the receiving end to understand. The idea is that someone who signs to communicate will have trouble doing so if the person with whom they are talking doesn’t read sign language. With the glove, what they sign becomes spoken language, removing the barrier.

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Keurig Kold makes soda, not coffee, from capsules

Keurig Kold makes soda, not coffee, from capsules

Geeks rejoice! Not only do you now have a way to enjoy flavorful caffeine beverages packed in tiny capsules of bliss, you can also replicate that feeling with your favorite fizzy drinks. Yes, Keurig, the coffee brewing brand that made such home machines a household name, is doing the same for carbonated beverages. Partnering with Coca-Cola, it is putting out the Keurig Kold system, a soda dispensing machine that promises to be safer than other machines that also dispense carbonated liquids of sugar and happiness.

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Google, NASA add D-Wave 2X to quantum computing arsenal

Google, NASA add D-Wave 2X to quantum computing arsenal

Some companies need a few computers to go about their business, others need very fast mainframes and servers to function. And then there are others who need exponentially faster computing to run at peak efficiency. Google and NASA are two examples of those companies, which is why they are heavily invested in the still nascent field of quantum computing. Luckily for them, D-Wave, a leading manufacturer of quantum computing equipment, has just revealed the D-Wave 2X to cater to their, as well as others', needs and experiments in the field.

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Zuckerberg to UN: Internet access can help bring world peace

Zuckerberg to UN: Internet access can help bring world peace

That may be a tall claim and one that many might scoff at, but that is exactly what Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, along with a host of other celebrities, told business leaders at a private luncheon at the United Nations last Saturday. Their connectivity campaign, one that seeks to make Internet access universal to the more than 4 billion people still deprived of the technology, believes that the Internet isn't only useful for sharing knowledge but also for helping end poverty and promoting world peace.

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Google to connect Indians to the Internet via train stations

Google to connect Indians to the Internet via train stations

Google has had some very ambitious and sometimes even incredible ideas to bring the Internet, whether low speed or high, to more people, from installing fiber lines in US cities to flying balloons in remote places in the world. Now it's bringing that vision and ambition to India, home country of new Google CEO Sundar PIchai. This time, however, it isn't looking to the skies to connect India's next 10 million to the Internet. Instead, it is looking to repurpose India's train stations to be come hubs of public high-speed Internet access across the country.

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WEpod to be first self-driving shuttle on public roads

WEpod to be first self-driving shuttle on public roads

While some car makers and technology companies like Google are still somewhat scrambling to make self-driving private cars a reality on public roads, Netherlands might already be taking the next big step towards autonomous driving: public transport. Called the WEpods, these electric shuttles will be ferrying commuters between the towns of Wageningen and Ede in Gelderland starting November. And it won't be settling for just some special, restricted road. These self-driving pods will be cruising along public roads and rubbing shoulders with regular vehicles and drivers.

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NYC wants all its public schools teaching computer science

NYC wants all its public schools teaching computer science

The present generation is well advised to study computer science as a preparation for their future career prospects, and some school districts are adjusting their curriculums to include the area of study. Back in early 2013, New York City’s former mayor Bloomberg announced the state’s Software Engineering Pilot program would be launched in 20 public schools. Now the city is taking that a step further, with the next decade bringing a big change.

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Samsung’s new 12 Gigabit LPDDR4 paves the way for 6 GB RAM on smartphones

Samsung’s new 12 Gigabit LPDDR4 paves the way for 6 GB RAM on smartphones

Samsung has been steadily improving its semiconductor products, from processors to NAND storage, and now to volatile memory, to help offset its disappointing smartphone sales. While the numbers and names might be a bit confusing thanks to how they're marketed, this 12 Gigabit, not Gigabyte, LPDDR4 RAM is still a notable achievement. By squeezing in more memory in a single chip made with the same 20 nm process, Samsung is practically paving the way for smartphones and tablets to soon have as much as 6 GB of RAM inside.

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Macy’s to test Best Buy shops in ten of its stores

Macy’s to test Best Buy shops in ten of its stores

Macy’s makes an appreciable effort to implement technology in its stores, and though you’re not likely to see much of that technology at this point unless you live in certain places in California and select other states, the company continues to experiment with new offerings. There's the retailer's beacon tests, for example, which pushes out deals and promotions to visitors. There's also the tablet-adorned dressing rooms that shuttle clothes directly to shoppers using a built-in chute. And, now, there's Best Buy.

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3Dom’s Wound Up 3D printing filament recycles coffee grounds

3Dom’s Wound Up 3D printing filament recycles coffee grounds

The rise of 3D printing has brought many advantages to the industry and to the world, chief among which is the democratization and increased accessibility of printing processes and products. One of the unsung benefits, however, is the potential to look for and use materials to replace toxic, fossil-burning plastic. Heading to the forefront of this mission, 3Dom, one of the USA's biggest 3D printing filament manufacturers, teamed up with bio-composite company c2renew to cook up all kinds of alternative filament material, first among which is made from coffee grounds.

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