printers

Scientists create “unprinting” technology

Scientists create “unprinting” technology

It's easy enough to print out a sheet of paper with some sort of text on it these days, but what about the process of removing that ink from the paper? Engineers at the University of Cambridge are working on a solution that makes that a reality and could lead to a boost in reusable paper technology. The solution is something that could indeed revolutionize the way we think about recycling.

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Canon unveils two new PIXMA wireless All-in-One photo printers

Canon unveils two new PIXMA wireless All-in-One photo printers

Canon is adding two new PIXMA wireless All-in-One (AIO) photo printers to their lineup with models MG8220 and MG6220. These printers are affordable and yet offer great design and convenient wireless connectivity for printing from anywhere as well as accessing images from the web without having to touch your computer. An added bonus is the updated software that now includes Easy-PhotoPrint EX and Full HD Movie Print.

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Tablets Saving Trees?

Tablets Saving Trees?

There is no question that the iPad and soon, other tablets, are making printing less and less necessary. When you can carry the content with you and read it comfortably, why do you need to print it out? A few restaurants now are using iPads for their menus and wine lists, and of course, sales of e-books are growing exponentially. John Paczkowski at The Wall Street Journal's Digital Daily has an interesting perspective on the tablet phenomena.

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Pantone Cookies for Delicious Printing Results

Pantone Cookies for Delicious Printing Results

If you've not entirely switched over your life to a completely paper-free approach, you've been affected by Pantone colors. They've got basically every color in the rainbow, and each color has it's own code. Why do designers love Pantone so much? Because they're both essentially exact, and they make for awesome iterations of other objects. Case in point - Pantone cookies.

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Thing-O-Matic is Inexpensive Star Trek Replicator

Thing-O-Matic is Inexpensive Star Trek Replicator

Sort of! This is MakerBot Industries' Thing-O-Matic, a home 3D printer for just over a thousand dollars ($1,225.00). Holy crap that's awesome. It's approximately 12 inches by 12 inches by 16 inches and can print 3D objects that you design on your desktop "continuously for hours at a time." This is the same sort of machine we had (probably still have) at my alma mater the Minneapolis College of Art and Design - last I checked they were using it to carve 3D replicas of human heads. All this stuff gets cut down from MakerBot ABS Plastic, which you get 1 pound of to work with for starters when you buy the Thing-O-Matic kit. Make a thousand rabbits!

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Concept Desktop Computer Prints and Scans from Inside Monitor

Concept Desktop Computer Prints and Scans from Inside Monitor

So you've got the need for some hard-copies of your papers to turn into your teachers for school, but you'd like to save space on the desk as well? Designer Byeong Min Choe has the answer you seek. This design is called "Document Extractor" and, looking like an iMac clone but with one giant difference, allows you to store a stack of paper in a tray behind it, and print, with the paper coming directly out the bottom. Not only that, the same place the paper comes out can also suck up, scanning single sheets of paper for you on the fly.

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Printer Cartridges Full of Living Tissue

Printer Cartridges Full of Living Tissue

This is no horror movie, this is part of a recent presentation at the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress, where Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine researchers had a super fun time showing off their results from a printer that uses living cells instead of ink. Fluid based inkjet technology used in the very printers you've got in your home or office is used to lay down cells, printing large sections of living tissue down on cut up or damaged areas of the body.

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The Daily Slash: July 7th 2010

The Daily Slash: July 7th 2010

Tonight's edition of The Daily Slash is going to be a bit different. If you'll recall, we've only ever had one video put into one of these nightly articles, but tonight, well, tonight is special. Why? Because the two videos we've included after the break are some of the more interesting ones we've seen lately, and we felt like we needed to share them, well past just the standard text-based variation. So, happy Wednesday, and welcome to tonight's very special edition of The Daily Slash. In the Best or R3 Media, we've got the Intercept coming soon, an even better giveaway, and the first images of the retail box for the white iPhone 4. And then in the Dredge 'Net, we've got intelligent service robots, LED monitors, and people who may print too much.

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HP’s Palm acquisition finalized: “amazing roadmap” promised

HP’s Palm acquisition finalized: “amazing roadmap” promised

It's July 1st 2010, the first day of Q3 2010, and that means Palm has officially slotted into the warm crevices of mother HP.  Public announcements of what exactly we can expect from the combination vary from the mundane (webOS-based printers, anyone?) to the mysterious (HP's various tablet strategies and the company's refusal to clarify on any of them), but according to the Palm blog this morning they're aiming for "an amazing roadmap of new tools for your mobile and web-connected future."

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