health

HTC Grip hands-on; finally, an HTC wearable

HTC Grip hands-on; finally, an HTC wearable

As expected, HTC now has a wearable. The company has long been complimentary of wearables, and vowed long ago to have one for us at some point. With the Grip, HTC hopes to get a grip on the wearable market, and tough it has a display — the Grip is more fitness wearable than smartwatch. It also makes good on HTC’s partnership with Under Armour, and when we consider other moves Under Armour has made, could make this wearable a go-to for fitness buffs.

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Huawei’s TalkBand N1 wants desperately to be fashionable

Huawei’s TalkBand N1 wants desperately to be fashionable

Huawei has a new set of Bluetooth headphones that also serve as a fitness tracker, and it’s hoping you’ll like it so much that you’ll wear it as a necklace even when you’re not working out. The Huawei TalkBand N1 isn’t the first paid of Bluetooth headphones we’ve ever seen, but they’re certainly some of the smallest: just 18g despite including active noise cancelation and a nifty magnetic clasp which holds the earbuds together around your neck when they’re not in your ears.

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Jawbone cites manufacturing for recent UP3 delay

Jawbone cites manufacturing for recent UP3 delay

Jawbone's UP3 health tracker is having difficulties again before coming to market. The release date has been pushed back before. The third generation health tracker device was originally slated to be ready by the end of 2014. The company has been seized with delays, missing crucial opportunities like the 2014-2015 holiday shopping season. The newly announced 10-11 week delay would put the UP3's release in May. Hopefully, all of the new additions to the UP3 will keep it ahead of the curve in the competitive health tracker device market. Such a delay gives room to competitors to up their stake in the market.

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Hasbro rehashes Skip-it and Twister into fitness tracker

Hasbro rehashes Skip-it and Twister into fitness tracker

Depending on when your childhood took place, you might have an entirely nostalgic new fitness tracking option (it's meant for kids, but we won't judge): Hasbro has tweaked its popular Twister and Skip-it games/toys to have a health-centric slant. Skip-it, for those unaware, was that ball connected to your ankle by a loop; you skipped it around to make the number counter increase, something that seems exceptionally archaic such a short while later. And Twister, dare we say, needs no introduction.

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Tomatan robot rides on your shoulders, feeds you tomatoes

Tomatan robot rides on your shoulders, feeds you tomatoes

Only in Japan will you see a robot designed to feed you tomatoes while you are running. Because you can never have enough tomatoes during a marathon. And you can never have enough hands to eat those tomatoes with. Named Tomatan, this robot will sit on the shoulders of one of the employees of Japanese tomato company Kagome, who commissioned the development of the robot, during the upcoming Tokyo Marathon. Good thing the marathon is more about surviving than winning, as the employee probably won't win any races with the contraption on his head.

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Nike+ Fuel app now connects with iOS Health, band no longer needed

Nike+ Fuel app now connects with iOS Health, band no longer needed

A significant update was released yesterday for the Nike+ Fuel app for iOS. Most notably, the app now features HealthKit integration, meaning data from Nike's FuelBand wearable can be shared with the iPhone's new Health app. But also important is that a FuelBand is no longer required at all, as users can instead rely on the health and movement tracking sensors built-in to the iPhone 6 and 5S. Since the app itself remains free, there's now no purchase required to use Nike's movement tracker.

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CliniCloud brings connected healthcare with stethoscope, thermometer

CliniCloud brings connected healthcare with stethoscope, thermometer

The ‘Internet of Things’ is bringing a lot of cool stuff that isn’t smartphones or tablets. Much of it has to do with your home, with several good DIY home security kits making a splash in their own way. Another avenue for connected success comes via medical equipment for the home, where devices connected to your phone (and an app) promise a better view of your health statistics. We’re seeing this come to light with Wishbone’s contactless thermometer, but a new pair of devices from CliniCloud want to push it a step further.

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Study: Wearables worse than phones for measuring steps

Study: Wearables worse than phones for measuring steps

The assumption that you need to strap something onto your wrist in order to accurately gauge your fitness level might not be accurate. Your favorite wearable might not be, either — or at least any more accurate at detecting steps taken than your phone. A new study claims apps are just as good at monitoring your activity level than some of the top wearables on the market. The University of Pennsylvania tested apps and wearables in a controlled environment, and the results are pretty interesting.

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This bra claims to detect cancer better than a mammogram

This bra claims to detect cancer better than a mammogram

We've seen some rather unusual lingerie before, like one that has a built-in heart sensor and some that light up in rather questionable circumstances. Cyrcadia Health is making yet another one, but this time it has a more serious tone. The iTbra is a "smart" bra that women can wear to take the place of a mammogram test or monthly tests. The bra is fitted with sensors which communicate with a doctor's or a user's mobile device, making cancer detection quicker and less awkward.

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Smartphone accessory detects HIV and Syphilis within minutes

Smartphone accessory detects HIV and Syphilis within minutes

New ideas into the development of medical diagnostic tools and devices is nothing new in the world of technology. However the latest of these ideas is a smartphone dongle that can detect major disease markers such as HIV and Syphilis in as little as fifteen short minutes, just with a prick of the finger. Researchers at New York Columbia University claim they can now, for a measly $34, completely eliminate the need for current equipment that can cost anywhere in the region of $18,000.

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