Google Music

GoMusic for Google Music for iOS Review

GoMusic for Google Music for iOS Review

Though the app GoMusic is certainly not the first to bring Google Music's cloud of tunes to the iOS platform, we're certain that it's currently the best solution on the market. This lovely little app takes what you've got on Android as well as the mobile web and slaps it on over to iOS where neither Apple nor Google have dared yet to venture. It's not that they can't, it's just that, well, Google Music is made to be an Android music service - but what do you know? It works here on the iPhone as well!

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Google Music to get scan-and-match feature soon

Google Music to get scan-and-match feature soon

Google was supposed to host a big Android event today, but it was cancelled over the weekend due to incoming Hurricane Sandy. A lot of new devices and features were planned on being announced, but it looks that will take a back seat for now. However, that's not stopping the rumors from swirling. It's said that Google Music will get a scan-and-match feature as early as this week.

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Google working on Music deauthorization issue

Google working on Music deauthorization issue

Over the past couple of days, Google Music users discovered that they once they hit the 10 device authorization limit they were restricted from removing devices. Users quickly found out that Google had changed the deauthorization number to four devices a year, bad news for those who frequently flash ROMs or move to different devices. Now Google has issued a statement regarding the change, saying they’re working on the problem.

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Google Music restricting device deauthorization

Google Music restricting device deauthorization

Google Music has a 10 device authorization limit, so if you review phones or flash a lot of ROMs you need to keep on top of all the devices filling up the list. Previously there was no limit on what you could deauthorize, but xda-developers forum posters are now saying that Google has placed restrictions on what you can deauthorize from your Music account. Needless to say, users aren’t happy with the change.

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Android revenue revealed for first time ever

Android revenue revealed for first time ever

This week in Google's defense against Oracle the first ever Android revenue numbers have been revealed in court. The information you're about to see, as Google warns us, is obviously not very new, but does goes us some measure of insight as to how Google worked with their mobile operating system at the time. The first sheet shown this week is an Android Ads Revenue chart which shows that Google at the time made more cash on Google ads on Apple devices than they did in the mobile realm than Android.

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Google looks to hardware to save Google Music tip insiders

Google looks to hardware to save Google Music tip insiders

Google is counting on its own-brand home entertainment hardware to revive interest in Google Music, which according to sources has left the search giant and its label partners disappointed in initial user adoption. Although Google Music has only been operational for around three months and so concerns are not yet too serious sources, insiders close to the talks tell CNET that Google is expecting demand to leap when it outs an "array of consumer devices."

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Google Music Artist Hub hands on Part 1: getting started

Google Music Artist Hub hands on Part 1: getting started

This week Google announced their new Google Music Artist Hub, a part of the Android Market's new music sales initiative and part of Google Music's now public cloud service - it's here that any artist, signed or not, can create a name for themselves in the very real and very live marketplace. What we're going to do here is go through the very basic process an artist will go through themselves to create an Artist Page from whens their music (and music videos) will be sold. I'll be using the pseudo name I use on many projects, A Tiny City, for future reference - don't expect any magical musical break throughs from me, but see how simple this process can be.

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Google Music Artist Hub gives no-label indy bands full control

Google Music Artist Hub gives no-label indy bands full control

Google has announced this week a whole new Google Music which will, as they explain, allow music artists to sell their own music at a 70/30 cut, that's 70% of the profit sent to the artist or band, plus a one-time fee. Artists are able to create their own profile for a one-time $25 fee, and will be able to sell their music directly to fans through this page. Individual tracks and albums will be able to be posted and sold, and all purchases will be able to be shared in the Google+ social network, through Android, and more. You'll be able to share tracks for free, preview tracks as little or as much for free as you like, and cash in without any label in between.

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Google boasts 200 million Android devices activated

Google boasts 200 million Android devices activated

We're covering live the special star-studded Google Music event taking place right now in Los Angeles. And before diving into all the juicy details, Google has revealed that its Android platform has continued to grow at an astounding pace. The company boasts now having 200 million Android devices activated.

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Google Music works with Major Labels, Indy Labels, and shares galore

Google Music works with Major Labels, Indy Labels, and shares galore

This week we're hearing all there is to know about the Google Music ecosystem as it exists both in the cloud and in the Android Market, not to mention inside the Google+ social network. What we're to understand thus far is that Google Music Beta, launched this summer on a limited scale, will now be open and available for everyone (in the USA thus far) for people to keep their music in the cloud completely for free. This ties in with the Google Music part of the Android Market, also open today, where users can purchase tracks and instantly have them both on their device and in the cloud where they can pin them to any device in the future. Announced with this big set of tidbits were three of the top four labels in the USA, EMI, Universal, and Sony Music.

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