Data Security

Facebook investigates tracking users’ cursors and screen behavior

Facebook investigates tracking users’ cursors and screen behavior

Facebook has been actively researching the feasibility, effectiveness, and profitability of tracking users' cursors and screen positions, reports the Wall Street Journal. The data would give the social media giant the ability to analyze the ways in which users interact with Facebook content and advertising. This would in turn let it change the site and its advertising methods according to where users hover their mice and scroll their device displays.

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Lavabit and Silent Circle team up for open source tool to make spy-proof email

Lavabit and Silent Circle team up for open source tool to make spy-proof email

As we've previously reported, both Lavabit and Silent Circle have shut down their encrypted email services in recent times, with Lavabit having been shut down due to government demands and Silent Circle shuttering its email service as a preemptive strike against the same sort of problems. Now the two have joined forces as the first two members of the Dark Mail Alliance, aiming to provide an open source tool for encrypting any email service.

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NSA secretly taps Google, Yahoo data transmission worldwide

NSA secretly taps Google, Yahoo data transmission worldwide

The National Security Agency, in conjunction with England's NSA counterpart Government Communications Headquarters, has been secretly intercepting Google and Yahoo data transmissions around the world, according to a new analysis of the Snowden documents. The documents show how the two spy agencies can cooperate to send copies of customer records en masse to the NSA's data centers at Fort Meade. Intercepted records include email addresses, personal identities, and even the contents of private messages flowing between and among Americans and all other nationalities. The interceptions are within the bounds of current US law because they occur at points outside US soil.

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Adobe breach affected 150 million accounts

Adobe breach affected 150 million accounts

AnonNews.org this weekend posted a 3.8 GB file listing over 150 million Adobe account usernames and hashed passwords stolen in the late September breach that came to light Oct. 3, reports Krebs Online Security. 38 million users were directly affected and have already been contacted by Adobe to change their passwords. That figure is above and beyond the 2.9 million accounts whose encrypted credit card information was stolen. The breach, it is now known, also included stolen source code for more of Adobe's programs than previously believed.

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Huawei ban upheld in Australia following government review

Huawei ban upheld in Australia following government review

Huawei, alongside with ZTE, has been the subject of concerns and scrutiny by the United States government and others, with fears revolving around possible spying that could be taking place on behalf of the Chinese government. The maker has previously been banned from use on Australia's National Broadband Network, something that was recently reviewed with the anticipation that the block would be ended. Such was not the case, however.

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Snapchat reveals unopened snaps can be retrieved and given to law enforcement

Snapchat reveals unopened snaps can be retrieved and given to law enforcement

Snapchat's premise is that it deletes snaps, something that has been foiled in various ways since the service found itself thrust into the popularity spotlight. Still, the notion that snaps are deleted might give users a wrong impression of their data's security and level of privacy, something the company recently covered in a blog post. Among other things, it was detailed that under certain conditions, law enforcement can get its hands on some messages.

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