Data Security

Hackers stole data from five European nations at September G20 Summit

Hackers stole data from five European nations at September G20 Summit

Network security company FireEye has reported a coordinated malware attack on five European foreign ministries. The attack took place last August just prior to the G20 Summit in September. It was achieved by sending the ministries email attachments bearing file names pertaining to the primary topic of the summit: military options in Syria. Once downloaded, the files allowed the hackers to monitor communications and steal data from the host machines. FireEye believes the hackers are from China, but it stopped short of alleging collusion with the Chinese government.

Continue Reading

Two million social media account credentials stolen and published

Two million social media account credentials stolen and published

The credentials for two million compromised accounts for social media sites and other websites have been posted online. They include credentials for Facebook, Yahoo, Google, Twitter, LinkedIn, a payroll service, and many others. The security breaches are believed to have been made possible through malware installed on user computers, not weaknesses in the websites themselves.

Continue Reading

Syme social network offers encryption in a world full of spying

Syme social network offers encryption in a world full of spying

Online security is a topic that has never been as popular as it has since Snowden leaked a variety of documents revealing widespread spying by the United States government. Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, and other such networks have all been targeted by the NSA , and as such many users may no longer feel comfortable using them. This is where Syme, a new social network currently in beta, comes in.

Continue Reading

Microsoft reportedly boosting security efforts in light of suspected NSA spying

Microsoft reportedly boosting security efforts in light of suspected NSA spying

Earlier today, sources spoke to The New York Times about a suspected tapping of fiber optic cables as the means by which the NSA managed to gather vast amounts of Internet data. Following this, sources -- which may or may not be related to the NYT's sources -- told the Washington Post that Microsoft is rapidly boosting its encryption plans in light of concern that the NSA could be intercepting its traffic.

Continue Reading

NSA hackers compromised at least 50,000 networks in 14 years

NSA hackers compromised at least 50,000 networks in 14 years

A large team of NSA hackers known collectively as the Tailored Access Operations (TAO) department successfully hacked 50,000 computer networks between the years 1998 and 2012, according to a new examination of the Snowden documents. A PowerPoint presentation seen this week by Dutch newspaper NRC Handelsblad revealed the statistic along with other information about the agency's Computer Network Exploitation (CNE) activities.

Continue Reading

Twitter unveils forward secrecy in bid to stymie spying government eyes

Twitter unveils forward secrecy in bid to stymie spying government eyes

As with many tech companies, Twitter has been caught up in the government spying fallout, and has taken steps to protect its users' data, the latest of which was an announcement on the company's blog this evening: forward secrecy. With forward secrecy, Twitter has essentially enabled a contingency plan against the possibility of some agency recording encrypted traffic and at some point in the future decrypting it with Twitter's private keys.

Continue Reading

Yahoo to encrypt all internal and user data by early next year

Yahoo to encrypt all internal and user data by early next year

Marissa Mayer, by way of the official Yahoo Tumblr, has announced the plans to begin encrypting more data. This follows the recent news about encrypting Yahoo Mail. The mail encryption is coming by January 8, 2014 and promises https (SSL - Secure Sockets Layer) encryption with a 2048-bit key. This next phase of encryption is set to go into effect during Q1 2014.

Continue Reading

Adobe hacks affected multiple US agencies, FBI says

Adobe hacks affected multiple US agencies, FBI says

The US Army, Department of Energy, Department of Health and Human Services, and other US government agencies were infiltrated by the Adobe software breaches that came to light last month, the FBI said in a memo this week. The memo, which was distributed throughout the affected agencies, said that the breaches actually started in December of 2012 and were carried out by the hacker group known as Anonymous. They then left "back doors" to government computer systems which Anonymous operatives could return to later, which some did quite publicly last month.

Continue Reading