SpaceX explosion leaves NASA reliant on Russian resupply

SpaceX explosion leaves NASA reliant on Russian resupply

With SpaceX's CRS-7 rocket in pieces and future launches grounded until the cause of Sunday's explosion is identified, the ISS is again dependent on Russia for supplies. Although the astronauts currently on the International Space Station have food, water, and other essentials in their orbiting stock cupboard to last them through October 2015, NASA says, it's still vital that the ISS Progress 60 rocket makes it up in one piece when it lifts off this coming Friday.

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iPhone 6s Force Touch models begin production soon

iPhone 6s Force Touch models begin production soon

Sources suggest that Apple's next iPhone begins production as soon as next month with Apple Watch "Force Touch" abilities. Not unlike what we saw when the MacBook and MacBook Pro originally got their Force Touch trackpads, this new iPhone will have two layers of pressing recognition. Because of this, the iPhone will have one extra way to select items. A firm touch, a hold, and a tap, as well as swipes and the like, all will work on the iPhone 6s. If all goes as Apple's gone for the past several years, the company will release an "s" version of its flagship phone - as well as an "s" version of its "Plus" device as well.

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Leap Second internet crash won’t happen like last time

Leap Second internet crash won’t happen like last time

Time stands still on Tuesday as an extra second is added to the 30th of June, 2015. Because the Earth's rotation is slowing - and in several billion years we'll all be dead - a second will be added to the clock. Without this second, we'd eventually have times of day that once were associated with the morning setting with the sun. We'd have chaos. But brought on so gradually that none would really notice the difference. Except computers. Back in 2012 when a second was added to the day, Linux-based systems were flung into chaos. Real chaos, not just imaginary.

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Microsoft’s new tablet casts ominous shadow over Surface Pro 4

Microsoft’s new tablet casts ominous shadow over Surface Pro 4

Microsoft has quietly slipped a new Surface Pro 3 configuration into its line-up, amid speculation that the Surface Pro 4 will never see the light of day. While you might expect the new model to lower the cost-of-entry to the Windows tablet with its detachable keyboard and pen input, in fact it slots neatly into the midst of the existing range, with a Core i7 processor like the flagship Surface Pro 3 versions, but with a compromise on storage.

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Knock-off Apple Watch charging cables appear on Amazon

Knock-off Apple Watch charging cables appear on Amazon

Well, here's a bit of a twist: knock-off Apple accessories that are selling for a higher price than the authentic ones. A handful of listings for fake Apple Watch charging cables have appeared on Amazon, and they are all more expensive than Apple's. The cables come from companies such as "Somoder," "Reiko," and "WL," and are priced between $45 and $58. To compare, Apple sells a 1-meter charging cable for the Watch for $29.99, while a 2-meter cable is $39.99.

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Microsoft has just improved the Oculus Rift’s lenses

Microsoft has just improved the Oculus Rift’s lenses

At E3 earlier this month it became apparent that Microsoft and Oculus have developed quite the buddy-buddy relationship, with the latter's Rift VR headset being compatible with both the Xbox One and Windows 10. Since the companies are good friends now, Oculus shouldn't take offense that Microsoft has developed a better lens for the Rift, offering a sharper image and less chromatic aberration. The design comes from the Microsoft Research group, and offers a decent improvement over the Oculus Rift DK2.

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LEGO Minifigures Online ends free-to-play, launches cross-platform

LEGO Minifigures Online ends free-to-play, launches cross-platform

LEGO Minifigures Online hast left its Beta once again, this time bringing a serious effort without the "free-to-play" nonsense of the past. This version of the game, being released for the first time today, will cost you - but only one time. Once you've got the game, the only paying you'll be doing is if you'd like to buy your own minifigures in real life - in physical toy stores - allowing you then to enter codes to gain access to the figures you've purchased. Other than that, you're free to go wild. This version of the game is the first to launch cross-platform on Windows PC, OS X, Linux, iOS (iPhone), and Android, all at once.

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Hyundai missed its fuel-cell target massively, but it’s not giving up

Hyundai missed its fuel-cell target massively, but it’s not giving up

Electric and hybrid cars may be most peoples' first thought when it comes to green travel, but Hyundai isn't letting underwhelming sales sour it on fuel-cells. After a year of sales, the company has sold or leased a little more than a quarter of the hydrogen-powered Tucson EV it hoped to, with just 273 cars reaching drivers since production began in 2013. Although that's well short on its 1,000 target, Hyundai maintains that fuel-cells have more potential for the company than electric cars, though its logic may be a little skewed.

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Google Maps will soon highlight US railroad crossings during navigation

Google Maps will soon highlight US railroad crossings during navigation

While it's hard to image there could be any remaining road data left that could be added to Google Maps for improvement, it turns out there is, and it could making using the service for navigation purposes a bit safer for drivers. In order to reduce the recent spike in the number of accidents at US railroad crossings, the Federal Railway Administration (FRA) has asked Google Maps to include the location of every public and private highway rail crossing.

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Google TouchBot: testing touch lag so you don’t have to

Google TouchBot: testing touch lag so you don’t have to

Everyone hates a laggy interface, but not everyone has the capability to scientifically quantify and measure lag in order to fix it. Google, however, isn't like everyone and has the resources, not to mention the need, to measure the lag between a touch gesture and the interface or program's response. It looked to Finland for answers, where OptoFidelity, a company specializing in test automation, gave birth to Chrome TouchBot, a robot that does exactly what its name says: run a series of touch-based tests on Android and Chrome OS devices.

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