iPhone 6 tipped at 4.7 and 5.7-inches for 2014

Jan 20, 2014
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It would appear that the waves of rumors surrounding the 2014 release(s) of the iPhone 6 have begun, starting in with a tip on two different screen sizes for starters. This release would take part in two tiers, one starting earlier in the year with a 4.7-inch display with 1280 x 720 pixels across it. The second tier would hit later in the year, bringing 5.7-inch display with 1920 x 1080 pixel resolution to maintain a minimum PPI for the "Retina" name.

This tip comes from International Electronic Business chief analyst Sun Changxu via Digi Tech, where they've suggested that the smaller of the two iPhone displays is now in trial production, hitting two million to three million in volume production by the time May 2014 rolls around. It's also suggested that production trials have not yet begun for the larger iPhone, suggesting that this machine might be released later in the year or into 2015.

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One should be suitably skeptical when looking at rumors such as these, especially since they're coming from double translations and, at their deepest bits, analysis work rather than Apple's official word. That said, it doesn't seem out of the question at this point for Apple to be working on a larger smartphone.

"It's wrong to look back. It's not scientific and testable. But I saw for the last few years one small screen in the midst of a lot of large screen and felt myself, as countless others must have, that the larger screens had more value.

Blame me for taking the leeway to suggest that this was the one door Apple left wide open." - Woz

The quote above comes from Steve Wozniak and was spoken all the way back in October of 2012. There he found it easy to suggest that Apple could be moving forward with a larger display, if only to cover the spot they'd left "wide open" for the opposition.

Have a peek at the timeline below for additional insight into the world of Apple's next iPhone release, and prepare yourself for what'll likely be a slightly larger change-up than the last couple of generations.


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