Health

Cancer study has bad news for people who drink soda

Cancer study has bad news for people who drink soda

Sugar is one of the most common elements in the average Western diet -- it can be found in obviously sugary snacks, but also in products one wouldn't guess contain high amounts of sugar, such as certain breads and savory sauces. Sweet drinks are arguably the most common way many people consume large quantities of sugar, both juice and soda being two popular examples. A recently published study has bad news for consumers who regularly drink these sweetened beverages.

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Free Slurpee at 7-Eleven: Actually not that unhealthy, just innutritious

Free Slurpee at 7-Eleven: Actually not that unhealthy, just innutritious

It is the 7-Eleven day celebration, and the Slurpee's are coming on fast and heavy. Today Slurpee drinks are free, and you're going to want to bury your face into a cup at your local 7-Eleven as soon as possible, most likely. Unless you don't want to grab your brains and squeeze in utter agony because of the ever-present threat of brain freeze, or the various artificial ingredients which we'll be going over presently. Let's take a look!

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CDC seeks data on mystery illness paralyzing kids before next outbreak

CDC seeks data on mystery illness paralyzing kids before next outbreak

A mysterious illness with no known cause or cure has resulted in a number of otherwise healthy children becoming paralyzed, the CDC reports, and it expects another record outbreak to happen in 2020. Called acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), this condition is described as rare but very serious by the CDC; it causes weak muscles and reflexes in the body, lesions in the spinal cord, and primarily appears in otherwise healthy kids. Officials are pleading for more information from doctors about the condition ahead of the next anticipated wave.

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13-year-old researcher finds hand dryers are harmful to children’s hearing

13-year-old researcher finds hand dryers are harmful to children’s hearing

A 13-year-old Canadian girl named Nora Keegan set out in 2016 to determine if the blower type of hand dryers used in bathrooms around the world were harmful to the hearing of children. She said that sometimes after using hand dryers, her ears would start ringing. Keegan also noted that other children didn't want to use hand dryers and that the kids would cover their ears.

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Blue light exposure at night may sabotage your keto diet efforts

Blue light exposure at night may sabotage your keto diet efforts

Exposure to blue light at night may be sabotaging your weight loss and low carb dieting efforts, a new study has found. The research focused on rats that followed a diurnal schedule, meaning they were awake during the day and slept at night. When exposed to light from LEDs for an hour at night, the rats were found to have an increased sugar cravings and reduced glucose tolerance the next day.

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Quorn vegan protein may be better than milk for building muscle

Quorn vegan protein may be better than milk for building muscle

A meat substitute called Quorn was found to aid muscle building better than milk protein, according to a new study. The research looked at the product's meat-free 'mycoprotein' ingredient, which is sourced from a microfungus called Fusarium venenatum that grows in soil. According to scientists with the University of Exeter, this protein may be ideal for stimulating muscle growth after exercise.

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Study warns grandparents let young kids have too much screen time

Study warns grandparents let young kids have too much screen time

Grandparents may be fueling excessive device usage among kids, a new study has found. Screen time among youth is a growing public health concern, but reducing the number of time kids spend on gadgets is tricky. According to research from Rutgers University, kids may be getting far too much screen time while in the care of grandparents who want to spoil their grandchildren.

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Study finds link between prostate cancer therapy and dementia risk

Study finds link between prostate cancer therapy and dementia risk

A study out of the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine has found a link between drugs commonly used to treat prostate cancer and an increased risk of developing dementia. The study looked at more than 150,000 men who had prostate cancer, 62,330 of whom started receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) within two years of being diagnosed.

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Dog treat salmonella warning issued for multiple states

Dog treat salmonella warning issued for multiple states

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued another salmonella warning, but this one doesn't involve hedgehogs or eggs. According to the agency, dried pig ears sold as dog treats are the likely source of a salmonella outbreak that has left 45 people infected, a dozen of whom were hospitalized as a result. Contact with the treats and the dogs that consumed them may result in infection.

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Popular blood pressure drug may boost risk of developing bowel disease

Popular blood pressure drug may boost risk of developing bowel disease

A new study warns that taking a popular type of blood pressure medication may put some people at risk of developing a dangerous bowel condition that, in some cases, can result in a medical emergency. The risk is greatest in the elderly, though researchers aren't sure what the underlying cause of this link is at this point in time.

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The FDA just fast-tracked this new blood cancer treatment

The FDA just fast-tracked this new blood cancer treatment

The Food and Drug Administration has announced that it will fast-track the approval of a drug called selinexor sold under the brand name Xpovio for the treatment of a type of blood cancer called relapsed refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM). The approval will only be granted for certain adult patients who haven't responded well to other treatment options.

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Study finds brief bursts of exercise may make you smarter

Study finds brief bursts of exercise may make you smarter

Though longer duration exercise has been found to offer a number of health benefits, a new study indicates that brief bursts of activity may come with its own positive effects. According to a study out of Oregon Health and Science University, researchers found that a short burst of exercise increased the function of a gene that boosts neuron connections in the part of the brain linked to memory and learning.

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