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Microsoft invites web apps to support Surface Duo and Galaxy Z Fold 2

Microsoft invites web apps to support Surface Duo and Galaxy Z Fold 2

The Microsoft Surface Duo and Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 2 have been compared and contrasted but, curiously, Microsoft doesn't think they're that different, at least not from an app development point of view. That's actually a good thing because that means that Microsoft's own app development tools could be used for both devices. That seems to be the spiel it is making with its new experimental Web APIs that it says will help web app developers target foldable phones, whether they have one, two, or even three screens.

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Chrome 86 paves the way for more powerful and richer web apps

Chrome 86 paves the way for more powerful and richer web apps

Web technologies have grown at an impressive rate and degree in the past years but there are still some things that they can't easily do compared to their native counterparts. Part of that is due to the very nature of web browsers that try to sandbox web pages and web apps as much as possible to prevent malware from getting through. The other is that the Web revolves around standards that have to be agreed on first.

As one of the Web's biggest stockholders, Google has been doing a rather delicate dance to address both, and Chrome 86 is adding more tools to developers' belt to make web apps just as feature-rich as native.

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ChromeOS.dev finally addresses one of the platform’s biggest flaw

ChromeOS.dev finally addresses one of the platform’s biggest flaw

Google has been heavily pushing Chromebooks and Chrome OS almost as the all-in-one computer system you'll ever need, especially with the upcoming support for running Windows applications (at least on the enterprise). As a software platform, however, Chrome OS's story has never really been complete and that is manifested in the lack of quality or even notable apps and games for Chrome OS. Google is finally adding a new chapter to that story with ChromeOS.dev, its new one-stop-shop to help developers get up and running on making software for Google's OS.

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Apple Music Web beta returns with a new tab and a new design

Apple Music Web beta returns with a new tab and a new design

For years, Apple has been rather selfish with its iTunes music experience, only begrudgingly allowing a Windows version for the sake of managing user's devices and music. With the launch of the Apple Music service, however, the company has started to accept other platforms to reach more subscribers, be it on Android or even on the Web. Apple Music on web browsers has long shed off its beta incarnation but now the testing version is back with a new look as well as a new tab for your listening pleasure.

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Stimulus check update: How much money do we get, and when?

Stimulus check update: How much money do we get, and when?

In in the summer of 2020, US citizens are edging ever closer to their second major stimulus check in less than a year. This payment was otherwise titled an "Economic Impact Payment" (EIP) by the IRS, and will be sent automatically to most US taxpayers. IF you filed a tax return in 2018, 2019, or are a senior or retiree, the IRS suggested that "no further action is needed" in order for you to get a Economic Impact Payment.

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Google Search mobile-first indexing is delayed to 2021

Google Search mobile-first indexing is delayed to 2021

Website owners can now probably breathe a sigh of relief now that Google is holding off on another one of its web-breaking changes. The search giant has been aggressively pushing for new systems and standards to make the Web safe and more accessible on any device, but those changes don't happen just by magic. They require site owners and developers to put in some extra work, work that they may not be able to afford right now, which is why Google is staying its hand in fully implementing its mobile-first indexing until March next year.

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Progressive Web Apps still have a long way to go

Progressive Web Apps still have a long way to go

We live in an app-centric world. Even those products and experiences that advertise focusing on your documents first mostly stop at the boundaries of the app. Crafting such apps isn't easy, especially when you want to support all the incompatible platforms in use today. There have been and continues to be numerous attempts at crossing those platforms but one solution seems to reappear time and again, a solution harnesses the power of the web, the one platform available on all platforms. Progressive Web Apps, as the current incarnation is called, has definitely gone a long way from the earliest Java applets but is still far from becoming the all-in-one solution its proponents try to advertise.

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Microsoft and Google team up to improve web apps on Android

Microsoft and Google team up to improve web apps on Android

There are many operating systems available today, from Windows to macOS to Linux to Android to iOS, a bit far too many for developers, especially lone ones, to support equally. There is also no shortage of frameworks and tools, like Qt or Google's Flutter, designed to make that a little less painful but the one platform for that truly permeates all of these is the Web. That is basically the appeal of the new generation of web apps, called Progressive Web Apps, and two of the world's larger software vendors are working together to make PWAs more like first-class citizens of the Google Play Store.

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Google’s new social network Keen: How does it work?

Google’s new social network Keen: How does it work?

Keen is a new social network from Google and the creators at Google Area 120. It's an experimental sort of system in which users can create a "Keen" with a set of keywords for their interests. These "Keens" automatically retrieve "resources" (webpages and articles and such) for the user at user-set intervals of time. You can also "collaborate" on a Keen. But what's all that mean, and why should you care?

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Google Sodar app practices social distancing in an odd way

Google Sodar app practices social distancing in an odd way

Remember the joke about there's an app for almost anything and everything? Apps have become so common that it's no longer a joke. It's our reality already. So when an app that lets you practice social distancing pops up, it's not really a surprise. But, as with anything related to Google, it isn't just a simple instructional or informational app. Instead, Sodar shows you just how far you should keep people away, at least as long as you're looking down on your phone.

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Stadia wireless controller finally works wirelessly on PCs

Stadia wireless controller finally works wirelessly on PCs

What is the point of a wireless controller if you can only use it with a wire? That may be the question that popped into the minds of early Stadia subscribers who found themselves forced to attach a cable to use the Wireless Stadia Controller on anything other than the blessed Chromecast Ultra. That question has now finally become moot as the Wireless Controllers can now ditch the wires if playing on a PC or laptop Chrome browser. Android users, however, are still out of luck.

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Your WiFi is about to get a whole lot faster [UPDATE]

Your WiFi is about to get a whole lot faster [UPDATE]

This week the FCC opened up 6GHz band to Wi-fi for the everyday average user, and for other unlicensed uses. This was the next big step - the biggest step, from a regulatory standpoint - toward the biggest upgrade in Wi-fi since 1989. The FCC vote opens up more space on which data can transmit over the internet, to cut down on congestion for everyday citizens. There'll be more space on which data can move, and with 6Ghz, that data can be transmitted a whole lot faster, too.

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