virus

Apple chipmaker TSMC closes factories after computer virus attack

Apple chipmaker TSMC closes factories after computer virus attack

Some of the biggest tech product companies in the world might be struggling with constrained supplies of processor chips in the weeks to come. Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC), the largest chip manufacturer in the world, was revealed to have been hit with a computer virus on Friday, resulting in temporary closure of several production factories and disruption of operations.

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Virus removal for Android: A step-by-step in 2018

Virus removal for Android: A step-by-step in 2018

Today we're taking a peek at the so-called Android virus, and how one might destroy said malicious entity. Before we go any further, know this: if you stick to Google Play, chances are you're gonna be safe. Google's got a fairly good handle on the "virus" game at this point, and any app you've installed from Google Play is going to be remotely removed if it's found to be malicious. For everything else, there's a quick process.

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Kaspersky Free is the anti-virus no one probably asked for

Kaspersky Free is the anti-virus no one probably asked for

It’s 2017 and we are still under constant threat from viruses, even biological ones. In fact, malware has taken on an even darker tone, including strains that have no purpose but to destroy your files, whether you pay a handsome ransom or not. And yet the anti-virus industry isn’t on the rise despite the rise in threats. Sensing a disturbance in the force, Kaspersky, one of the more popular names in the AV market, has finally released a free version of its eponymous software. While free is good, it’s timing is also too good to be true.

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First Mac ransomware: Am I infected?

First Mac ransomware: Am I infected?

If you want to see your files again, cough up one Bitcoin. That's the message some unwitting Mac owners faced after accidentally installing malware on their computers, with the so-called ransomware encrypting their personal data and then charging them the equivalent of around $400 to retrieve it. Dubbed KeRanger, the malware - identified this weekend - is believed to be the first of its kind spotted in the wild.

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How to avoid the new Netflix viruses and malware

How to avoid the new Netflix viruses and malware

Netflix scams are on the rise, so say the security crews at Tripwire and Symantec. How do you avoid such malware? How does your grandmother avoid downloading a virus? The answers are relatively simple, and they begin with sticking to the course. That is, not clicking on any advertisements that promise lower costs and coupons for Netflix-based deals on subscriptions. That's where this newest wave of internet evil is coming from - let your uncle know what's up.

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Malware Museum shows how past viruses were creative, artful

Malware Museum shows how past viruses were creative, artful

Today's viruses make your heart ache with sorrow and stress. Yesteryear's viruses sometimes made your heart ache from laughter. While still relatively destructive during their time period, the malware of previous decades showed one thing that is lost upon today's cybercriminals: a sense of humor. Thanks to the Internet Archive, however, those can now be relived, or reviled if you were a victim, showcasing the viruses prevalent during the 80s and 90s, in all their animated pixel art glory. Without the damaging virus itself, of course.

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The Malware Museum offers a look at the viruses of yesteryear

The Malware Museum offers a look at the viruses of yesteryear

Most people have a pretty good idea of what computer malware and viruses look like in the current era: pop-up windows, spam sites set as the homepage, and bogus apps installed if they're lucky, with spyware and software that allows remote hacking being some of the worst. But about in the MS-DOS era? What did computer users of yore dread when getting infected? Well, the Malware Museum offers a historic, and safe, look back at what was conjured up in the 80s and 90s.

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Kaspersky tipped to be sabotaging rival anti-virus software

Kaspersky tipped to be sabotaging rival anti-virus software

Russian security company Kaspersky is one of the most trusted names when it comes to software protection but, while a recent hacking incident may have portrayed it as a victim, it might not actually be that innocent after all. Two former employees, who of course desires to remain anonymous, reveals that Kaspersky has been covertly working to undermine rival anti-virus software by flagging innocent and important system files as malware, causing these other AV programs to delete those files, turning unsuspecting users into collateral damage in their wake.

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Facebook targets malware with new notifications

Facebook targets malware with new notifications

Facebook is again targeting malware, this time by adding a new notification that will show up on infected users' computers. If the notification shows up, one of two software options will be displayed depending on the best for the type of issue the user is having.

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Bitcoin mining being forced by new Linkup ransomware

Bitcoin mining being forced by new Linkup ransomware

Emisoft has come forward with details on a newly discovered form of ransomware. This one is dubbed "Linkup" and while it will hold your computer hostage, it doesn't lock your computer or encrypt all your files like we have seen in the past. Instead, this version of Linkup blocks Internet access and also turns your system into a bitcoin mining zombie.

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AVG AntiVirus for Mac launches with triple protection

AVG AntiVirus for Mac launches with triple protection

AVG has been offering fee antivirus software for Windows PC users and smartphones for a long time. The antivirus software that the company offers users for free works well and protects 172 million active users today according to the company. AVG has announced the launch of a new software suite aimed at protecting Mac computers.

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Linux-based Internet-connected devices widely vulnerable to new worm

Linux-based Internet-connected devices widely vulnerable to new worm

Symantec researcher Kaoru Hayashi has posted a report to the effect that a sizable portion of the "Internet of Things" is now vulnerable to a worm called Linux.Darlloz. The worm attacks CPUs running on devices like routers, set-top boxes, security cameras and industrial control systems, as well as PCs. The worm relies on a pre-May 2012 vulnerability still present in many devices running Linux.

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