Soylent

Soylent banned in Canada over its meal replacement claim

Soylent banned in Canada over its meal replacement claim

Soylent founder and CEO Rob Rhinehart has announced that his company's 'meal replacement' drink has been banned in Canada. The ban comes from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, essentially Canada's equivalent to the US's FDA, which found that Soylent doesn't meet the nation's requirements to be labelled as a 'food replacement' product. Rhinehart indicated that the ban will be a temporary one as the company works out the regulatory problem.

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Soylent is now available from some 7-Eleven stores

Soylent is now available from some 7-Eleven stores

Soylent -- it's that bizarro food-drink that has both faithful fans and fervent critics. When it first launched, you had to buy Soylent as a powder, something that itself has gone through multiple iterations. In the relatively recent past, the company expanded beyond that by adding a pre-mixed liquid drink option, but you still had to order it from the company's website or through Amazon. If you're curious to try the stuff for yourself but don't want to shell out for a minimum online order, there's a new option: 7-Eleven stores.

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Soylent has a couple new flavors to join its new powder formula

Soylent has a couple new flavors to join its new powder formula

Soylent recently released an updated powder formula that, hopefully, won't make people as sick as the previous one. Silently joining that new powder are a couple of new flavors, finally freeing customers from the (admittedly minor) hassle of having to add their own flavors. Both cacao and 'nectar' flavors have made an appearance on Amazon, though they appear to be sold out at the moment.

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Soylent fixed its sickness-inducing powder, but made an enemy in the process

Soylent fixed its sickness-inducing powder, but made an enemy in the process

Soylent has released the promised updated powder that, hopefully, eliminates whatever it was that made some of its customers sick. The powder is called formula 1.7, and as the company previously stated, it doesn't include algal flour, the alleged source of the illnesses. In the process, though, Soylent earned itself some ill feelings from now-former partner TerraVia, which supplied the algal flour that Soylent cited as the cause of the sickness.

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