Software

Huawei’s Android replacement is a 7 year paranoia project

Huawei’s Android replacement is a 7 year paranoia project

Huawei's loggerheads with the US government may have only come to a boil in the past weeks, but the Chinese company has been preemptively working on an alternative to Android for seven years, according to a report today from China. The smartphone-maker has seen its business in the US and further afield thrown into disarray, after the Trump administration added it to an export blacklist.

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Opera GX browser for gamers stops runaway CPU and RAM use

Opera GX browser for gamers stops runaway CPU and RAM use

Opera has launched a new browser focused on gamers, allowing for precise control over just how much of your PC resources the app can tap into. Opera GX won't be released fully until later in the year, but an early access program is kicking off today to give gamers a taste of what to expect.

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Chrome Remote Desktop on the Web pushes desktop app out

Chrome Remote Desktop on the Web pushes desktop app out

There will always come a time when you wished you could access a computer without actually touching it. And, no, we're not talking about Minority Report. Remote computer access has always been tricky business, requiring some third-party apps, complicated setups, and new account sign-ups. Google's Chrome Remote Desktop has tried to simplify that process and is now making it even simpler by removing the need for any program other than your trusty Chrome browser.

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Microsoft Excel Stock pulls in data from Nasdaq and Refinitiv

Microsoft Excel Stock pulls in data from Nasdaq and Refinitiv

People have done crazy things with Microsoft's famous spreadsheet program, like games or artwork, but Excel is still all about numbers, figures, and other quantifiable data. Its use in financial settings is, of course, normal but sometimes the data that you need doesn't come from some static source or formula. When it comes to stocks, users need fresh and up-to-date information, which is why Microsoft is now rolling out a new Stocks data type to pull that from the Interwebs and right into your tables.

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What’s new in the Android Q Beta 4 update

What’s new in the Android Q Beta 4 update

This morning Google released their Android Q Beta 4 update for all devices in their Beta program. This system package is made primarily for app developers, but can be downloaded by anyone with a Google Pixel smartphone. This version of the Beta allows a couple of new devices that weren't part of the program before: Pixel 3a and Pixel 3a XL.

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macOS Catalina might put an end to the Dashboard and widgets

macOS Catalina might put an end to the Dashboard and widgets

At its WWDC 2019 keynote, Apple made the somewhat surprising revelation of iPadOS along with some features that iOS users have been clamoring for for years. That included mouse support, external USB storage, and, for some, home screen widgets. The latter is something probably few expected will happen but Apple seems to have a lot of surprises in store. Including the almost ironic but unannounced death of macOS' Dashboard feature.

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Firefox now blocks 3rd party tracking cookies by default

Firefox now blocks 3rd party tracking cookies by default

Browser makers are going on a cookie diet. After years of allowing site owners to abuse cookies, the likes of Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox are finally putting their foot down and saying "no". The latter has actually rolled out its "Enhanced Tracking Protection" feature quite a while ago but it will now turn it on by default for all users. Mozilla didn't stop there, though, and is pushing out more privacy-related features for other apps in its Firefox ecosystem.

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macOS Catalina splits up iTunes, adds iPads as secondary displays

macOS Catalina splits up iTunes, adds iPads as secondary displays

WWDC keynotes are, first and foremost, a place to learn about incoming software updates for Apple's various platforms, and macOS is in for a big one with macOS Catalina. As rumored plenty of times in the lead up to WWDC, macOS Catalina will split up iTunes into three different apps: Apple Music, Apple Podcasts, and Apple TV. Gone is the bloated and slow single app that iTunes has become over the years and in its place rises three new apps that will hopefully accomplish their tasks much faster.

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iPadOS official: Multitasking, Files, more for iPad

iPadOS official: Multitasking, Files, more for iPad

Apple wants the iPad to replace your PC, and it's taking a big step in that direction by introducing iPadOS today. While the first urge might be to accuse this of being just an iPad-centric re-branding of iOS, iPadOS definitely seems to be more than just that. iPadOS has some big features coming along with it, chief among them being improvements to multitasking.

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Apple watchOS update tracks menstrual cycles, at last

Apple watchOS update tracks menstrual cycles, at last

At WWDC 2019 Apple spoke about the future of the Health app and associated features on Apple Watch. Dr. Sumbul Desai stood onstage speaking about watchOS 6, and how they'll soon introduce Activity Trends for users. With this system, users will be able to see how they move and when they move in a more grand pattern than ever before - not least of all with a newly revealed Cycle Tracking feature.

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It looks like iTunes is living on borrowed time

It looks like iTunes is living on borrowed time

iTunes has been around for a very long time - since 2001 in fact - but it may not be much longer before we're saying goodbye to it. With WWDC coming up next week, Apple is said to be doing away with the classic software in favor of separate applications for music, videos, and podcasts. If you've been using iTunes since the early days of the iPod, you might want to start saying your goodbyes now.

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Apple’s new App Store charm offensive shows how big the stakes are

Apple’s new App Store charm offensive shows how big the stakes are

With less than a week until WWDC, and following a Supreme Court ruling giving the green light to App Store antitrust lawsuits, Apple is bringing out the big guns in its defense of the download store and its approvals policies. A new post about how the App Store works - and why it's at its best the way it is now - has been added to Apple's site, contesting allegations that the walled garden is bad for consumers and developers alike.

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