sensors

ZTE second-gen under-display camera might not fix its biggest flaw

ZTE second-gen under-display camera might not fix its biggest flaw

At MWC Shanghai, ZTE flaunted its next-gen technologies for under-display imaging sensors, including its second under-display camera or UDC. It remains the only smartphone maker that can boast of a commercial product that utilizes a screen with absolutely no cutout, but the ZTE Axon 20 5G can't really boast of producing great selfies because of it. There may have been hopes that its next UDC would address this problem but while it does get an upgrade, it doesn't actually address its most glaring issue.

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Samsung 50MP ISOCELL GN2 brings Dual Pixel Pro AF, staggered-HDR

Samsung 50MP ISOCELL GN2 brings Dual Pixel Pro AF, staggered-HDR

When Samsung launched its first 100x Space Zoom camera on the Galaxy S20 Ultra last year, it was criticized for neglecting one important aspect of digital photography, the autofocus performance. Since then, Samsung has been careful to improve AF in its flagship phones and its next one might take it to the next level, or so Samsung boasts. Going beyond its own Dual Pixel brand of PDAF, Samsung is announcing a new 1.4μm 50Mp ISOCELL GN2 sensor that carries a Dual Pixel Pro version of its AF tech, along with other tricks that improve the sensor's low-light performance.

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A new microfluidic sensor measures lactate concentration during exercise

A new microfluidic sensor measures lactate concentration during exercise

Researchers at the Tokyo University of Science have created a new wearable microfluidic sensor that can measure lactate concentration in sweat in real-time. Lactate is a compound present in sweat that's an important biomarker used to quantify exercise. Available wearable sensors are typically rigid devices that can cause skin irritation.

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Nikon 1-inch stacked CMOS sensor boasts 1000 fps shooting

Nikon 1-inch stacked CMOS sensor boasts 1000 fps shooting

While smartphone makers are still playing the megapixel game, camera makers are looking into other aspects of digital photography that can still be improved. Nikon, for example, just boasted the development of a new stacked CMOS sensor that can shoot high-resolution images, up to 4K in fact, at a rate of 1,000 frames per second. While that a\lone might already be impressive, it isn't the only feat that this sensor is capable of.

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Wearable sensor can detect stress hormone cortisol in human sweat

Wearable sensor can detect stress hormone cortisol in human sweat

EPFL engineers working with a startup company called Xsensio have developed a new wearable sensing chip that can measure the concentration of a stress hormone called cortisol in human sweat. The wearable sensor allows for quasi-continuous monitoring and can help doctors understand and treat stress-related conditions such as burnout and obesity. The sensor could potentially be placed on the patient's skin in the form of a wearable patch and allow near-continuous monitoring of cortisol concentrations, which is the main stress biomarker in the wearer's sweat.

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MIT create plant-based sensors that monitor arsenic levels and soil

MIT create plant-based sensors that monitor arsenic levels and soil

Researchers from the Disruptive and Sustainable Technologies for Agricultural Precision at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, the research arm of MIT in Singapore, have created a new type of plant sensor. The sensor is a nanobionic optical sensor that can detect and monitor arsenic toxicity levels underground in real-time.

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Smellicopter detects scents using live moth antenna

Smellicopter detects scents using live moth antenna

Researchers at the University of Washington have created a small drone called the Smellicopter fitted with live moth antenna. The drone uses those live moth antennae to seek out smells. It can smell chemicals in the air, locate disaster survivors, gas leaks, explosives, and more. Researchers relied on live moth antenna because sensors created by humans aren't sensitive or fast enough to find and process specific smells while flying through the scant odor plumes the sources create.

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Cornell stretchable sensor could redefine soft robotics and virtual reality

Cornell stretchable sensor could redefine soft robotics and virtual reality

Cornell researchers have created a fiber-optic sensor utilizing inexpensive LEDs and dyes that resulted in a stretchable skin-like material able to detect deformations, including pressure, bending, and straining. The sensor could have soft robotic systems applications and could be a game-changer for augmented reality technology. A soft wearable sensor could allow augmented reality users to feel sensations similar to those felt in the real world.

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iPhone 12 Pro People Detection could help keep people safely away

iPhone 12 Pro People Detection could help keep people safely away

The phrase "social distancing" or "physical distancing" has been quite common these days as the world continues to curb the spread of the COVID-19 virus. That may be easy to do, even if people seem to find it hard to comply with, but that presumes you're even aware of how near people are. Those with sight impairment might not be so aware of such distances but an upcoming accessibility feature to the iPhone 12 Pro and iPhone 12 Pro Max will use their fancy new LIDAR sensor detect people nearby and even tell the user how close or far they are from you so you could avoid them or tell them to keep their distance.

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Wearable sensor helps ALS patients who can’t speak to communicate

Wearable sensor helps ALS patients who can’t speak to communicate

Researchers at MIT have created a new wearable sensor for people who have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as ALS. Many people with the disease gradually lose their ability to control their muscles, often losing their ability to speak. MIT researchers have designed a stretchable, skin-like device that can be attached to the patient's face and can measure small movements like a twitch or smile.

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A new wearable generator can power wireless sensors

A new wearable generator can power wireless sensors

A Caltech researcher named Wei Gao, assistant professor of medical engineering, has been developing a range of inexpensive wearable sensors and methods of powering them using the human body. Powering wearable sensors has always been the biggest challenge. While batteries are an option, they aren't ideal because of their bulk and because they run out of charge.

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Metallic wearable sensors printed directly on the skin require no heat

Metallic wearable sensors printed directly on the skin require no heat

A team of international researchers, including engineers from Penn State University, has developed a process that allows printing metallic wearable sensors directly on the skin without requiring heat. The new process has helped wearable sensors evolve from simple electrodes to bendable devices able to provide biometric measurements and comfort for the user. The first author for the study, Ling Zhang from Harbin Institute of Technology in China, says the team created a simple and universally applicable fabrication technique using a novel sintering aid layer, allowing direct printing for on-body sensors.

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