security

iPhone X Face ID frustrations see parents next to complain

iPhone X Face ID frustrations see parents next to complain

Apple's Face ID may be dividing opinion among iPhone X fans and critics, but for family users the iOS security system is causing more immediate headaches. Those parents using Family Sharing on their iPhone or iPad have discovered that granting approval is a little tougher on the iPhone X than it has been on previous iPhones. What's unclear at this stage is whether that's a bug, or an intentional feature.

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OnePlus 5 Face Unlock update confirmed

OnePlus 5 Face Unlock update confirmed

The OnePlus 5T may be top of the popular Android smartphone-maker's tree right now, but that doesn't mean owners of the OnePlus 5 should forget about feature updates. The handset is less than a year old, and clearly has some new tricks up its sleeve. Most notable is borrowing a security feature that has until now been limited to the OnePlus 5T: face unlock.

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Snowden’s Haven app turns phones into home surveillance devices

Snowden’s Haven app turns phones into home surveillance devices

Edward Snowden has released his own Android app that transforms a cheap smartphone into a home surveillance device. The app, called Haven, uses the phone's existing hardware, such as its cameras and microphone, to keep an eye out for intruders who could tamper with computers, hide cameras, and more. The app enables more surveillance options than you'd get with a typical home security camera.

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Windows Hello just got fooled by a face photo

Windows Hello just got fooled by a face photo

As time goes on, biometric authentication is becoming more and more important. We've seen that in the rise of fingerprint scanners and facial recognition software, such as Windows Hello and Face ID on the iPhone X. Just how foolproof are these biometric authentication methods, though? In the case of Windows Hello, it may not be as secure as you thought.

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Twitter two-factor authentication can now use 3rd party apps

Twitter two-factor authentication can now use 3rd party apps

Two-factor, sometimes called two-step, authentication has become one of the favored methods of strengthening logins. Especially considering how humans seem to have an innate tendency to use incredibly weak passwords. But not all 2FAs, as it is abbreviated, are created equal and some, like SMS, are only just a little bit secure than regular passwords. That’s why some sites that use 2FA also allow third-party authenticator apps to provide the second factor. And, finally, Twitter now does as well.

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Karma Black ultra-secure LTE hotspot preorders go live at a discount

Karma Black ultra-secure LTE hotspot preorders go live at a discount

In August, Karma announced the upcoming launch of a privacy-minded mobile hotspot device that would, among other things, have a built-in VPN. Called Karma Black, that device will officially be available to purchase in January, the company has revealed. The hotspot will provide buyers with LTE data wrapped in a layer of security, helping protect data, block potentially harmful advertisements, and more.

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Android phone security ramps up with hardware-level support

Android phone security ramps up with hardware-level support

This Android Security team developer Gian G Spicuzza spoke about what's new in Android Oreo for security. This next generation smartphone OS is made to be secure for the most personal device in the life of a person with both hardware security support, platform hardening, and process isolation. Device identifier changes join new layers of app security with Android Oreo as well.

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Google to require apps to target recent Android versions, 64-bit

Google to require apps to target recent Android versions, 64-bit

Security is one of the thorniest subjects in the Android community. For one, it’s blamed on the fragmentation that makes it difficult to roll out security updates in a timely manner. For another, it is also blamed on the somewhat lax security of the platform itself. Of course, Google takes Android security seriously, trying to balance the platform’s openness with the need to put in more checks. Starting next year, Google will put its foot down to improve Android security, but it’s not really going to be as bad as that sounds.

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2017’s worst passwords will leave you horrified

2017’s worst passwords will leave you horrified

We're less than two weeks out from the start of 2018, and that can only mean one thing: it's time to look back at some of the worst passwords of the year. This year was particularly bad for online security, with many companies reporting breaches that left customer data exposed. Of course, we also have the Yahoo breaches that were revealed late last year, leaving hundreds of millions of accounts at risk.

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Blink Video Doorbell is easy on your DIY skills and wallet

Blink Video Doorbell is easy on your DIY skills and wallet

It's been a little while since we last heard from Blink, but the company is back today with a new video doorbell on offer. Known simply as the Blink Video Doorbell, the mission of this little device seems to be combining Blink's existing efforts in the realm of security cameras with the functionality of a doorbell.

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WannaCry ransomware is North Korea’s doing, US says

WannaCry ransomware is North Korea’s doing, US says

Remember WannaCry? If you don’t or never even heard about it, this latest public statement coming from the US will probably make sure you won’t. The ransomware that plagued Windows computers in the first half of the year has been blamed for not a few outages of computer systems all over the country, including some life-critical ones in hospitals. And now, the mastermind behind WannaCry has been finally unmasked. At least according to the US. And, unsurprisingly, it is pointing the finger at North Korea.

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Homeland Security: 18 first responder apps had critical security issues

Homeland Security: 18 first responder apps had critical security issues

The Department of Homeland Security has announced a pilot project called "Securing Mobile Applications for First Responders" that looked into cybersecurity threats affecting public-safety apps. "The pilot sought to determine the degree to which the selected public-safety apps are vulnerable to cyberattack," the Department explained. During this pilot, the team found that 32 out of 33 popular first responder apps contained security and privacy issues.

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