security

Chrome will block installing extensions outside its Web Store

Chrome will block installing extensions outside its Web Store

Once upon a time, OK not so long ago, browsers such as Chrome and Firefox fought for supremacy over browser extensions. That war has seemingly simmered down but the remnants threaten the security of at least one of them. Chrome browser extensions have, unfortunately, been one of the major sources of malware for its users. Now Google is stepping in and will tighten security by soon preventing extensions from being installed from outside its own Chrome Web Store.

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OnePlus 6 can boot any image even with locked bootloader

OnePlus 6 can boot any image even with locked bootloader

What use is having a lock when you leave the door wide open anyway. That’s the puzzle that OnePlus 6 owners are now facing after it was discovered how the phone may be fundamentally insecure right at the very gates. According to a security researcher, it is possible to flash any modified boot image on to the OnePlus 6, regardless of whether the bootloader is locked or not. The only consolation users have is that the hacker will need physical access to the device to accomplish this easy break-in.

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Secret Facebook deals gave some companies special user data access

Secret Facebook deals gave some companies special user data access

Facebook is back in the controversy spotlight following a new report claiming it had data-sharing deals with some companies. Per the claims, Facebook allowed select companies to have special access to user data, including after its 2015 changes intended to better protect user info. The sources allege that Facebook called these deals "whitelists" behind closed doors, having specifically struck them with the companies.

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Facebook bug exposed 14 million users’ private posts to public

Facebook bug exposed 14 million users’ private posts to public

Facebook is no stranger to privacy issues, and that includes bugs. In the latest example of a bug leaving private communications exposed, it has been revealed that a Facebook glitch active for a little over a week made private posts visible to the public. Around 14 million Facebook users were potentially impacted by the issue, which Facebook has since fixed.

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Flight Sim Labs threatens Reddit mods with libel over DRM thread

Flight Sim Labs threatens Reddit mods with libel over DRM thread

It might not be that good at making tools to protect its DRM, but Flight Sim Labs seem to be pretty good at stirring up controversy for itself. Earlier this year, the popular flight simulation developers were discovered to have “erroneously” implemented an anti-piracy mechanism that harvested some users’ Google Chrome passwords. Now its DRM strategy is again at the center of another scandal but not because of any technical or security problem but because the company is threatening legal action against Reddit moderators over a thread discussing that topic.

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Ticketfly hack update: site still down, buyers get workaround for tickets

Ticketfly hack update: site still down, buyers get workaround for tickets

Yesterday Ticketfly confirmed that its website had been compromised by a hacker who vandalized the home page with a Guy Fawkes image. A report later that day claimed the hacker had potentially stolen company data and was holding it ransom, seeking a single bitcoin in exchange. The Ticketfly site is still down, and now the company is back with an update.

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Chrome, Firefox has been leaking Facebook profiles, names since 2016

Chrome, Firefox has been leaking Facebook profiles, names since 2016

Facebook just can't seem to catch a break and has become everyone's favorite scapegoat for privacy problems. Sometimes, however, it's not exactly Facebook's fault. Case in point is a recently reported and, fortunately, fixed vulnerability that allowed malicious third-party sites to glean Facebook information like a user's profile picture and name. And that vulnerability, ironically comes from a standard Web feature that was introduced way back in 2016.

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Ticketfly shuts down temporarily after hacker infiltrates site

Ticketfly shuts down temporarily after hacker infiltrates site

Ticketfly, a ticket distribution service, has temporarily shut down after discovering a "cyber incident," the company has revealed. Any attempts to access the Ticketfly website result in a message advising visitors of the event; the rest of the service is unavailable. The hacker had replaced the website's with a new picture and a warning.

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Apple is blocking Telegram updates worldwide says CEO

Apple is blocking Telegram updates worldwide says CEO

Secure messaging app Telegram has gone without iOS updates since mid-April, CEO Pavel Durov has claimed, accusing Apple of blocking updates globally for more than a month. The allegation comes after Russia demanded a ban on Telegram in April, when the app-maker refused to hand over the keys to its encrypted chats.

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Samsung doesn’t have to update old phones, court rules

Samsung doesn’t have to update old phones, court rules

Samsung won't be forced to update older Android phones, a court has ruled in Europe, despite accusations that the company potentially leaves owners at risk of unforeseen security problems. The smartphone-maker had been dragged into the courts in the Netherlands by consumer rights group Consumentenbond, which argued Samsung was potentially leaving users unprotected.

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OnePlus 6 Face Unlock fooled by photo, no surprise there

OnePlus 6 Face Unlock fooled by photo, no surprise there

Not all smartphone face unlock features are created equal. Android has long had such a basic feature and so did Windows 10. Apple's Face ID, however, introduced a new level of sophistication, not to mention marketing, that may have made consumers presume that every device advertising "face ID" features would offer the same security and accuracy. As the recent OnePlus 6 face unlock spoofing incident demonstrates, however, that's definitely not the case. And, to be fair, that was never the case for OnePlus in the first place.

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Chrome 67 prepares to kill passwords

Chrome 67 prepares to kill passwords

Once the only way to protect accounts, be they online or offline, passwords are now seen more as a liability than an ally. Everyone's out to kill it, from Apple to Microsoft to, now, Google. The rollout of the Chrome browser version 67 went almost under the radar. That, however, belies what's inside this feature packed release, which includes the beginning of the end for weak passwords using WebAuthn and something like a secure USB key or even your fingerprint.

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