security

After Huawei’s Best Buy snub, now the FCC may make things worse

After Huawei’s Best Buy snub, now the FCC may make things worse

Huawei's US struggles could grow even further, with reports that the FCC is considering new rules that would actively dissuade carriers from using the Chinese company's products. The claims follow leaks earlier this week, which suggested retail behemoth Best Buy - one of a handful of stores offering Huawei's smartphones, in addition to other products - was planning to cease sales of the brand in the coming weeks.

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Mozilla calls out Facebook’s current default privacy settings

Mozilla calls out Facebook’s current default privacy settings

Mozilla just called out Facebook, saying it believes there are still issues with the social network's default privacy settings. Due to these concerns, Mozilla has chosen to "pause" its advertising on Facebook, giving the company a chance to earn back its business by taking "stronger action in how it shares customer data, specifically strengthening its default privacy settings for third party apps."

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Orbitz data breach exposes 880,000 customer credit cards

Orbitz data breach exposes 880,000 customer credit cards

Travel company Orbitz has revealed a huge security breach that exposed about 880,000 customer credit cards. According to the company, the breach -- which was discovered on March 1 -- could have spanned from October 1, 2017, until December 22, 2017, during which time the hacker may have had access to certain data. The data itself was submitted between January 1, 2016, and June 22, 2016, on the Orbitz platform, as well as between January 1, 2016, through December 22, 2017, through select business partners.

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Lufthansa may have cracked the airplane boarding problem

Lufthansa may have cracked the airplane boarding problem

Lufthansa believes it may have cracked the airplane boarding problem, with news the airline will roll out its time-saving biometric system across multiple US airports. According to Lufthansa, its facial recognizing gates helped the airline board an A380 plane in about 20 minutes, and potentially in a more secure way, too.

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Japan IT Week Spring 2018: Here’s what to expect

Japan IT Week Spring 2018: Here’s what to expect

Almost all of the major annual tech shows, like CES, MWC, and IFA, happen in the West, though, of course, their audience and exhibitors come from all over the world. There are, however, other equally big IT gatherings on the other side of the globe that also give important insight on the trends and developments in those regions. In two months’ time, Japan will be holding the country’s and one of the region’s largest trade show, Japan IT Week Spring, and its lineup shows just how much AI and IoT have spread throughout the world.

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Bentley made a biometric safe for its luxury SUV

Bentley made a biometric safe for its luxury SUV

Bentley owners wanting a secure nook to leave their watch, diamonds, or that Fabergé egg they refuse to travel without now have the option of a fingerprint-locked safe in the automaker's super-luxe SUV. The Bentley Bentayga was already fairly outlandish in its vision of luxury, but at the hands of personal commissioning division Mulliner it takes a leap for even greater superlatives.

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IBM’s salt-grain sized computer is ready for the blockchain

IBM’s salt-grain sized computer is ready for the blockchain

A computer the size of a grain of rock salt is not only the world's smallest computer, IBM claims, but could be cheap enough to spread AI smarts and the blockchain ubiquitously. Shown off for the first time at IBM Think 2018, the company's annual research event, the tiny computer could have huge implications for making sure everything from medication to luxury goods are genuine rather than counterfeit.

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Dark phone company caught selling phones to drug dealers

Dark phone company caught selling phones to drug dealers

The United States Department of Justice indicted 5 individuals for their work with Phantom Secure, a company that made "black" phones for users of all sorts. It's not the making of no-tracking smartphones that got the folks with Phantom Secure in trouble. It was the providing of these phones to international drug dealers that did them in.

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Intel details Meltdown and Spectre-proof processors

Intel details Meltdown and Spectre-proof processors

Intel promised hardware protection in its chips in the aftermath of the Spectre and Meltdown discovery, and now it's detailing just what it has planned for its new CPUs. The chipmaker found its processors under the spotlight back in January, when Google Project Zero and others discovered low-level vulnerabilities in several generations of Intel chips that could potentially allow hackers to exploit consumer and enterprise systems.

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Nest x Yale Lock, Hello, and Temp Sensor make the smart home slick

Nest x Yale Lock, Hello, and Temp Sensor make the smart home slick

Nest is ramping up their efforts to be a full smart home security and smart assistant for all users this week with several new products and functionality. They're releasing the Nest Hello video doorbell, the Next x Yale Lock, and the Nest Temperature Sensor. They're also bringing the connections with each device working in concert with the rest - Nest top to bottom.

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Nest x Yale Lock lets people in after Nest Hello sees them

Nest x Yale Lock lets people in after Nest Hello sees them

The smart home security market is about to heat up. Amazon just recently acquired Ring, undoubtedly in direct opposition to Google who of course owns Nest. Not too long after the latter launched the Nest Hello, it is coming out with a complement to its smart doorbell camera. Partnering with famed lock maker Yale, the Google subsidiary has just revealed the Nest x Yale Lock designed to let people in without a key. With your consent, of course.

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Smart Home benefits and risks: look before you connect

Smart Home benefits and risks: look before you connect

There’s no escaping the future. Sooner or later, most of our home appliances will be connected, to each other, to our phones, and to the Internet at large. It has never been so easy to get started. A smart bulb here, a smart plug there, a smart speaker in the living room. But just because something is easy or inevitable doesn’t mean you should go rushing in. Considering what’s at stake, it’s even more necessary for us to take stock of the situation and get a better sense of what you gain and what you lose when you make your home smart, sometimes smarter than you even.

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