Science

10,500-year-old extinct Great Irish Elk skull and antlers found in lake

10,500-year-old extinct Great Irish Elk skull and antlers found in lake

A fisherman in Ardboe, a small village in Ireland, discovered the skull and antler remains of an extinct Great Irish Elk, a creature that hasn't roamed the Irish landscape in thousands of years. Though this isn't the oldest Great Irish Elk discovery -- that distinction goes to one dated around 14,000-years-old -- it is far more notable: the massive skull and antlers are completely intact.

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Scientists discover omnivorous shark that eats lots of seagrass

Scientists discover omnivorous shark that eats lots of seagrass

Movies and popular culture would have us believe that all sharks only eat meat. That appears to be untrue for at least one species of shark called the bonnethead shark. It looks a lot like a hammerhead shark with more rounded bits around the eyes and is a very close relative to the hammerhead. A new study published recently looked specifically at this type of shark and what it would eat.

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Data suggests Saturn’s gigantic hexagon might reach hundreds of kilometers high

Data suggests Saturn’s gigantic hexagon might reach hundreds of kilometers high

Scientists are pouring through the data that the Cassini Saturn mission provided on the ringed planet and its atmospheric conditions. Back in 2004 Cassini originally found that the southern hemisphere was in summer and a broad, warm, high-altitude vortex was spinning in the southern pole with no similar conditions existing in the colder, wintertime, northern pole.

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Scientists may clone ancient foal from remains found in Siberia

Scientists may clone ancient foal from remains found in Siberia

Researchers from South Korea and Russia hope to clone an ancient foal found preserved in Siberia, Russian media reports. The foal was recently discovered in Siberia by residents who spotted the remains in melting permafrost. Work is currently underway to harvest living cells from the remains -- if any can be found -- potentially paving the way for future woolly mammoth cloning.

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Harvard researchers invent printing process that uses sound waves

Harvard researchers invent printing process that uses sound waves

Researchers at Harvard University have announced the development of a new printing method that could have a significant impact on the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and food. The process uses a printing method powered by sound waves to generate drops of liquid. The team says the method has an unprecedented range of composition and viscosity.

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Popular NSAID pain reliever linked to serious heart health risk

Popular NSAID pain reliever linked to serious heart health risk

A new study warns that a popular NSAID pain reliever called diclofenac has been associated with an increased risk of serious heart health issues, including heart attacks. The medication is currently available as an over the counter painkiller, which means it can be purchased without a prescription. Some researchers suggest the risk means the drug should only be available as a prescription.

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Russia suspects sabotage in Soyuz ISS air leak

Russia suspects sabotage in Soyuz ISS air leak

Russia is investigating potential sabotage of its Soyuz rocket, after evidence that a drill was responsible for the hole spotted at the International Space Station was unearthed. Astronauts in orbit resorted to using epoxy to seal the hole late last week, with the incident first blamed on a meteorite strike.

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NASA launches sweet contest to convert carbon dioxide to glucose

NASA launches sweet contest to convert carbon dioxide to glucose

NASA wants people to help it to build the technology that will be needed to support putting humans on Mars. Part of that tech is devising a way to use the natural resources on Mars to make the things humans need to survive and live on the planet. One of the most abundant resources on Mars is carbon dioxide.

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Planet Nine might be invisible for at least 1,000 years

Planet Nine might be invisible for at least 1,000 years

Scientists have long believed that our solar system might have a ninth planet orbiting well beyond Neptune and Pluto. Scientists hypothesize that the mysterious planet would be between five and 20 Earth masses and would orbit on an elliptical some hundreds or thousands of times more distant from the Sun than the Earth.

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Insects may devour more vital crops as Earth heats up

Insects may devour more vital crops as Earth heats up

A new study warns that insects may devour more crops as the planet heats up, potentially increasing their consumption of popular grains by as much as 25-percent. The increase would result from higher temperatures, which boosts insect energy demand and results in more crops falling victim to pests. The study also reveals that pest numbers may increase in our warmer future.

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NASA forms Opportunity rover rescue plan as Mars dust storm abates

NASA forms Opportunity rover rescue plan as Mars dust storm abates

NASA has issued its latest update on the Mars dust storm impacting one of its two Martian rovers, Opportunity. According to the space agency, researchers continue to see signs that the global dust storm is calming down. NASA expects enough sunlight will soon make its way to Opportunity rover for it to recharge its batteries, but questions remain over whether it's in any condition to do so.

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These stunning images of Saturn’s auroras are groundbreaking

These stunning images of Saturn’s auroras are groundbreaking

Striking new images from the Hubble Space Telescope have revealed the vast auroras fluttering atop its North Pole, the best shots ever captured of the glowing halo. The new images are in fact an amalgamation of seven months of capture by Hubble, and are already giving astronomers the opportunity for new insights into the light shows.

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