Science

Science confirms misophonia is a real condition

Science confirms misophonia is a real condition

Misophonia -- if you don't have the condition, it can be baffling when you run into someone who does. Individuals with misophonia have a severe intolerance for certain obnoxious sounds, such as gum being chewed loudly. Exposure to such noises provokes a nearly uncontrollable anger in so-called misophonics, a reaction some have tried to paint as irrational or fake. Science, it turns out, disagrees with that criticism, finding that misophonia is indeed a very real condition.

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NASA Gliders will gather weather data during flight

NASA Gliders will gather weather data during flight

NASA has introduced WHAATRR: the Weather Hazard Alert and Awareness Technology Radiation Radiosonde Glider. With this, the space agency says, weather data could be cheaply (relatively speaking) and quickly acquired for organizations that include the National Weather Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The glider could, potentially, save the National Weather Service $15 million in costs every year.

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US GAO voices concerns about SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket defects

US GAO voices concerns about SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket defects

An incoming report from the US Government Accountability Office could house safety concerns about SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket. The findings from this congressional investigation could threaten to delay SpaceX in its aggressive launch schedule. Those findings could also leave SpaceX's planned manned flights grounded until the uncovered issue is fixed.

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Boeing’s Starliner capsule will use 3D printed components

Boeing’s Starliner capsule will use 3D printed components

Boeing's CST-100 Starliner capsule won't start flying until next year, but when it does, a significant number of its components will be made through 3D printing. Boeing has recruited Oxford Performance Materials to produce around 600 parts for these space taxis, and these parts are offering some major benefits to Boeing without much in the way of negative trade-offs.

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Bat Bot is the drone you probably want to but can’t fly

Bat Bot is the drone you probably want to but can’t fly

If you think that flying robots are still science fiction, that’s probably because you may have not realized that the popular quadcopter drones are, technically speaking, flying robots. If that doesn’t meet your criteria of a robot and would prefer something less industrial looking, then you might be interested in B2 instead. Short for “Bat Bot”, B2 is a robot that tries to mimic, and learn from, the flying capabilities of bats, resulting in a contraption that is both fascinating and yet creepy at the same time.

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Flu ‘breathalyzer’ detects virus, not alcohol

Flu ‘breathalyzer’ detects virus, not alcohol

A professor with the University of Texas at Arlington’s Materials Science and Engineering Department has developed a breathalyzer of sorts that works by detecting the flu virus rather than alcohol. Such a breath monitor, as it is properly called, requires a patient to exhale into the mouthpiece, at which point sensors look for biomarkers pertaining to the flu virus, revealing whether the patient is ill.

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Frog saliva can be like water, then honey, then water again

Frog saliva can be like water, then honey, then water again

Frogs, among their other amphibious relatives, are popular, or notorious, for their rapid tongues that can seem to catch and hold on to any unwitting victim. But if you think its secret weapon is its tongue, you’d only be half right. Working secretly and almost invisibly is the frog’s reversible saliva. “Reversible” because it can switch from watery fluid to viscous honey-like liquid and back to watery form in a blink of an eye. And that is actually the secret of what makes frogs’ tongues so sticky.

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Zombie wasps found infected with different, smaller brain-eating wasps

Zombie wasps found infected with different, smaller brain-eating wasps

Researchers with Rice University have detailed a new disturbing discovery involving one particular type of wasp and a different, smaller wasp variety that turns them into zombies. The victim is known as the ‘crypt gall wasp,’ a name given to a type of wasp that tricks live oak trees into forming small ‘crypts’ in their stems. The wasps' young are raised in these crypts, where they eventually gnaw their way to freedom, but a different parasitic wasp, it turns out, hijacks this process for its own purposes.

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Newly discovered Time Crystals may wiggle forever

Newly discovered Time Crystals may wiggle forever

Scientists have detailed a new sort of crystal which creates what they define as "a new phase of matter." This Time Crystal is "also really cool because it is one of the first examples of non-equilibrium matter," said lead researcher Norman Yao from the University of California, Berkeley. In other words, these crystals are perpetually in motion as they cannot settle into equilibrium. While the atoms in these crystals are able to settle into a pattern, they cannot stop moving altogether.

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Feeding hamsters nothing but corn turns them into cannibals

Feeding hamsters nothing but corn turns them into cannibals

Forget surviving off a silo of corn if the apocalypse ever rolls around -- if a recent study is any indication, the eventual lack of proper nutrients may drive you into the arms of crazed cannibalism. Such is the fate of some unfortunate hamsters in France eating mass quantities of corn, that itself being due to monoculture on the industrial level. When there's nothing but corn for as far as the eye can see, what else do the hamsters have to feed on? Their young.

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Our oldest ancestor looked like a tiny bag of teeth

Our oldest ancestor looked like a tiny bag of teeth

Hundreds of millions of years ago, a creature that looked like a miniature bag of teeth roamed the sea. This creature was around one millimeter in size and likely live at the bottom of the sea, scrounging for food between grains of sand on the seabed. "We think that as an early deuterostome this may represent the primitive beginnings of a very diverse range of species, including ourselves," said Simon Conway Morris, Professor of Evolutionary Palaeobiology and a Fellow of St John's College, University of Cambridge.

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Researchers find observational evidence that the universe is a hologram

Researchers find observational evidence that the universe is a hologram

The holographic universe notion is nothing new — it was first suggested back in the 90s — but it just gained a lot of traction thanks to a new research project helmed by researchers from Italy, the UK, and Canada. The group’s study is said to present the first ever observational evidence supporting the idea that our seemingly 3D universe is in fact a really complex (and big) 2D hologram.

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