Science

NASA successfully launches Mars InSight lander

NASA successfully launches Mars InSight lander

This early hours of Saturday morning saw NASA successfully send the Mars InSight lander on its way to the Red Planet. Just after 4:00 AM Pacific, the lander was launched atop a ULA Atlas V rocket from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, marking NASA's first interplanetary mission to depart from the West Coast. The InSight lander will now make a six-month journey to Mars, where it will study the planet's subsurface.

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April’s CO2 levels had the highest average in recorded history

April’s CO2 levels had the highest average in recorded history

The most common greenhouse gas created by human activities, carbon dioxide, was measured at record levels last month. According to Scripps Institute of Oceanography, the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii measured the atmosphere's average carbon dioxide concentration level at 410.31 parts per million last month. That's the highest monthly average in recorded history.

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475 million year old fossil found on lake’s edge

475 million year old fossil found on lake’s edge

Walking along the beach of Douglas Lake in East Tennessee, an 11-year-old by the name of Ryleigh Taylor happened upon an object. A structure, rather, that Taylor first described as a "Moana Rock." It does, after all, look somewhat like the "Heart of Te Fiti."

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Microbeads may help prevent burn wound infections: study

Microbeads may help prevent burn wound infections: study

Microbeads are terrible for the environment, but they show promise for healing burns. That's according to computer simulations showing that microbeads coated with protein may be able to block bacteria that could otherwise infect burns and delay the healing process. Past studies using burnt rats have shown similar promising results.

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Researchers develop laser beams for your eyes

Researchers develop laser beams for your eyes

If you have ever watched a cartoon or movie with Superman in it, you know that one of his powers is the ability to shoot lasers out of his eyes. In the scientific world, these are known as ocular lasers and a group of researchers from the University of St Andrews has made them one step closer to reality. The team says that it may now be possible to create ocular lasers thanks to a new ultra-thin membrane that uses organic semiconductors.

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NASA is sending a seismology spacecraft to Mars: Here’s why

NASA is sending a seismology spacecraft to Mars: Here’s why

NASA will launch a groundbreaking mission to Mars this Saturday, sending a new spacecraft to the red planet for the first time since 2012. The NASA InSight lander - short for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport - aims to drill into Mars' crust, tracking seismic activity that might unlock new secrets about our own planet.

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Embryo-like structures made in lab using only stem cells

Embryo-like structures made in lab using only stem cells

Researchers have successfully created "embryo-like" structures in a lab using stem cells. The team was composed of researchers with the Hubrecht Institute and MERLIN Institute; they used mouse stem cells for the model embryos. According to researchers, the success will help science understand the earliest processes of life, as well as issues like diseases originating from the embryonic stage and infertility.

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NASA’s KRUSTY reactor could enable long-term missions to the Moon and Mars

NASA’s KRUSTY reactor could enable long-term missions to the Moon and Mars

One of the key issues that face NASA and other space exploration agencies with putting long-term missions on the Moon, Mars, and other bodies in the solar system is power. Manned missions take lots of power for science and to keep astronauts alive. NASA has shown off a new power generation device that it says will fuel these future missions.

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This bird had the first beak, with teeth

This bird had the first beak, with teeth

If you wanted to know what the first bird beak looked like, today's your lucky day. The Ichthyornis dispar was the subject of a paper published this week. Ichthyornis dispar is the name of a creature with the now-oldest bird beak in the world. "The first beak was a horn-covered pincer tip at the end of the jaw," said researcher and Yale paleontologist Bhart-Anjan Bhullar. "The remainder of the jaw was filled with teeth."

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Stephen Hawking’s final paper: Not a fan of the multiverse

Stephen Hawking’s final paper: Not a fan of the multiverse

According to the last paper published by Stephen Hawking, our universe is simpler than previously imagined. The paper went by the name "A Smooth Exit from Eternal Inflation?" and it was authored by Stephen Hawking and Thomas Hertog. In this paper, Hawking and Hertog describe a reality in which our observable universe emerged from a larger, unobservable universe dictated by eternal inflation.

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Flat-Earther conference poses Pac-Man world theory

Flat-Earther conference poses Pac-Man world theory

It seems to be increasingly popular today to ignore cold, hard scientific facts in favor of whatever your preferred notion of the world we live in is. This is never clearer with the folks who believe that the Earth is flat. Flat-Earthers count among their ranks people from all walks of life, including a fair number of celebrities.

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Vaping doesn’t impact gut bacteria like smoking: study

Vaping doesn’t impact gut bacteria like smoking: study

A new study has found that non-smokers and individuals who "vape" have the same gut bacteria. However, smokers -- people who smoke traditional tobacco cigarettes -- have disrupted microbiome, according to the study. The revelation highlights another potential benefit found in switching from traditional to tobacco-less cigarettes, though from a health standpoint, quitting altogether remains ideal.

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