Science

Scientists create highest resolution Antarctic map ever

Scientists create highest resolution Antarctic map ever

Antarctica is a very cold and desolate place and maps of the continent were not of very high resolution in the past. Previous maps had a resolution of 1,000 meters, but a new map has been created that changes that. The new high-resolution map created by a mapping project called The Reference Elevation Model of Antarctica has a resolution of 2 to 8 meters.

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Pluto is a planet argues new research – and it always was

Pluto is a planet argues new research – and it always was

The debate over whether Pluto is a planet has been ongoing for years and there's no signs of that ending. New research out of the University of Central Florida argues against the 2006 definition that stripped Pluto of its status, citing research into 200 years of scientific literature on the requirements for classifying a planet.

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Scientists find cells in hippocampus linked to bravery and anxiety

Scientists find cells in hippocampus linked to bravery and anxiety

Scientists have identified cells in the hippocampus that may be responsible for the degree of bravery exhibited by an individual, according to a new study. The findings may pave the way for future anxiety treatments that target only the part of the brain responsible for the anxious disposition rather than the entire brain. The research comes out of Brazil's Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte and Sweden's Department of Neuroscience of Uppsala University.

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Antarctica Map: Highest resolution terrain map yet made

Antarctica Map: Highest resolution terrain map yet made

Today we're having a peek at the newly revealed and newly-public "most accurate" high resolution terrain map of Antarctica. This is REMA, or the Reference Elevation Model of Antarctica. Straight from the folks at Ohio State University, this map is made by what its creators say is "applying fully automated, stereo auto-correlation techniques to overlapping pairs of high-resolution optical satellite images."

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MIT researchers develop robot arm able to pick up any object after inspection

MIT researchers develop robot arm able to pick up any object after inspection

One of the biggest challenges for robots is something that humans can do so easily we don’t even see it as a challenge. When we walk through our home if we see something like a mug on the table we can pick it up by the handle no matter the orientation. Robotic hands find something that simple to be a major challenge. Human dexterity is credited in part to our eyes because we can see the object clearly making it easy to pick up.

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10,500-year-old extinct Great Irish Elk skull and antlers found in lake

10,500-year-old extinct Great Irish Elk skull and antlers found in lake

A fisherman in Ardboe, a small village in Ireland, discovered the skull and antler remains of an extinct Great Irish Elk, a creature that hasn't roamed the Irish landscape in thousands of years. Though this isn't the oldest Great Irish Elk discovery -- that distinction goes to one dated around 14,000-years-old -- it is far more notable: the massive skull and antlers are completely intact.

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Scientists discover omnivorous shark that eats lots of seagrass

Scientists discover omnivorous shark that eats lots of seagrass

Movies and popular culture would have us believe that all sharks only eat meat. That appears to be untrue for at least one species of shark called the bonnethead shark. It looks a lot like a hammerhead shark with more rounded bits around the eyes and is a very close relative to the hammerhead. A new study published recently looked specifically at this type of shark and what it would eat.

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Data suggests Saturn’s gigantic hexagon might reach hundreds of kilometers high

Data suggests Saturn’s gigantic hexagon might reach hundreds of kilometers high

Scientists are pouring through the data that the Cassini Saturn mission provided on the ringed planet and its atmospheric conditions. Back in 2004 Cassini originally found that the southern hemisphere was in summer and a broad, warm, high-altitude vortex was spinning in the southern pole with no similar conditions existing in the colder, wintertime, northern pole.

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Scientists may clone ancient foal from remains found in Siberia

Scientists may clone ancient foal from remains found in Siberia

Researchers from South Korea and Russia hope to clone an ancient foal found preserved in Siberia, Russian media reports. The foal was recently discovered in Siberia by residents who spotted the remains in melting permafrost. Work is currently underway to harvest living cells from the remains -- if any can be found -- potentially paving the way for future woolly mammoth cloning.

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Harvard researchers invent printing process that uses sound waves

Harvard researchers invent printing process that uses sound waves

Researchers at Harvard University have announced the development of a new printing method that could have a significant impact on the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and food. The process uses a printing method powered by sound waves to generate drops of liquid. The team says the method has an unprecedented range of composition and viscosity.

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Popular NSAID pain reliever linked to serious heart health risk

Popular NSAID pain reliever linked to serious heart health risk

A new study warns that a popular NSAID pain reliever called diclofenac has been associated with an increased risk of serious heart health issues, including heart attacks. The medication is currently available as an over the counter painkiller, which means it can be purchased without a prescription. Some researchers suggest the risk means the drug should only be available as a prescription.

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Russia suspects sabotage in Soyuz ISS air leak

Russia suspects sabotage in Soyuz ISS air leak

Russia is investigating potential sabotage of its Soyuz rocket, after evidence that a drill was responsible for the hole spotted at the International Space Station was unearthed. Astronauts in orbit resorted to using epoxy to seal the hole late last week, with the incident first blamed on a meteorite strike.

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