Science

Popular insecticide throws bumblebee populations into chaos

Popular insecticide throws bumblebee populations into chaos

Popular insecticides called neonicotinoids are disrupting bumblebee life, according to a new study, causing big decreases in bee populations. Though the harm caused by this type of insecticide has been previously studied, researchers weren't sure how it was causing increased bee deaths. The new study sheds light on that, finding that neonicotinoids disrupt nest life and colony thermoregulation.

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DNA confirms 10,000-year-old mummy is Native American ancestor

DNA confirms 10,000-year-old mummy is Native American ancestor

A 10,000-year-old skeleton found in a Nevada cave is the ancestor of a Native American tribe, according to a new study. The remains are known as the Spirit Cave mummy and were believed to be part of a group called "Paleoamericans" that existed before Native Americans. Genetic testing of DNA extracted from the mummy's skull changed that.

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Parker Solar Probe survives humanity’s first close Sun approach

Parker Solar Probe survives humanity’s first close Sun approach

NASA's Parker Solar Probe has survived its first close approach to the Sun, the space agency has announced. The spacecraft is officially the only human-made object to get within 15 million miles of our star, a record previously set by the Helios B back in 1976. The Parker Solar Probe made its closest approach to the Sun on November 5; data sent back to scientists on Earth indicates it survived the event in excellent condition.

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High-temperature semiconductors and stronger magnets pave the way to a cheaper fusion-powered future

High-temperature semiconductors and stronger magnets pave the way to a cheaper fusion-powered future

One of the goals that scientists around the world have been working towards for years is clean and cheap fusion power. A move to fusion power is believed to be one key to helping reverse climate change created from older methods of generating electricity. Researchers from MIT and Commonwealth Fusion systems are working to speed the development of fusion energy using new technologies. The tech they are leveraging in their plan is new high-temperature superconductors that can be used to build magnets that produce much stronger magnetic fields.

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Astronomers discover pairs of black holes ready to merge as galaxies collide

Astronomers discover pairs of black holes ready to merge as galaxies collide

Some of the most powerful objects in the entire universe are black holes. Black holes live at the center of galaxies, and as massive galaxies hurtle through space, sometimes they collide with each other and merge over hundreds of thousands of years. Astronomers have observed several pairs of galaxies in the final stages of merging after colliding. The image seen below shows these galactic mergers using techniques to peer through the dense clouds of dust and gas that surround the merging galaxies.

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Prehistoric art in Borneo cave includes world’s oldest figurative painting

Prehistoric art in Borneo cave includes world’s oldest figurative painting

Researchers have discovered the world's oldest known cave painting of an animal, according to a new study. The painting features a creature that looks like a bull and dates back around 40,000 years. Until now, scientists believed the world's oldest cave paintings were located in Europe, but this newly discovered art was found in Indonesia.

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Incredible Earth airglow photo shows the beauty of science

Incredible Earth airglow photo shows the beauty of science

Our planet is home to a lot of fascinating phenomena, and that's especially true when we start throwing the atmosphere and nearby space into the mix. One of the coolest - and perhaps most eerie - of these phenomena is called "airglow." If you've never seen airglow before, a new photo shared by NASA gives you that chance, and it definitely makes for a striking image.

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Ozone found healing thanks to UN initiatives

Ozone found healing thanks to UN initiatives

A study this week by a UN commission showed that our planet's ozone layer's holes seem to be healing. Healing extremely slowly, but still - on the mend. This is extremely good news for all living flora and fauna on this planet, but is especially welcome news for green activists. It is through the past two decades of work on planet-saving green initiatives that we've gotten to this point - but it's not necessarily permanent.

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Nanocardboard is incredibly light and springs back into shape if bent

Nanocardboard is incredibly light and springs back into shape if bent

Everyone is familiar with cardboard, the paper product commonly used to make boxes of all sorts. The problem with cardboard is that while it's lightweight and has decent strength, the material isn't suitable for many uses. For uses where more strength and durability are needed, a team of engineers from the University of Pennsylvania has created a new material called nanocardboard.

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Deep Learning AI diagnosed Alzheimer’s 6-years earlier than conventional methods

Deep Learning AI diagnosed Alzheimer’s 6-years earlier than conventional methods

One of the most important things for combating Alzheimer's disease is early diagnosis so treatments for the condition can start before damage is severe. The earlier interventions start, the better the outcome for the person suffering from the condition. A new study was published to the medical journal Radiology has found that early prediction for Alzheimer's disease later in life can be made using PET brain scans and AI technology.

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Curiosity turns over new mile as rover returns to old location

Curiosity turns over new mile as rover returns to old location

NASA says its Curiosity rover just wrapped up a relatively long trip on Mars, this resulting in its odometer turning over the 12-mile mark. The rover is now located at the Red Planet's Lake Orcadie, a site where NASA previously attempted to drill into grey rock. The space agency anticipates successful results this time around thanks to newly identified drill sites and an improved drilling process.

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Piranha barking reveals fish identities in murky water

Piranha barking reveals fish identities in murky water

Piranhas are known for their sharp teeth and carnivorous appetites, but few think about the sounds they make. These small fish "bark" by contracting their gas bladders to produce a noise. A new study reveals that these barking sounds differ based on species and offer a way for researchers to identify the fish even in dark waters.

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