Science

(RED) Apple grows as new products and Apple Pay fund AIDS research

(RED) Apple grows as new products and Apple Pay fund AIDS research

Apple is marking World AIDS Day with a bevy of new products that also mark its ten year anniversary of partnering with (RED). Four new accessories - including an iPhone 7 Smart Battery Case now available in the appeal's distinctive hue - have been added to the Cupertino company's range ahead of the holidays, while Apple will also donate a portion of Apple Pay transactions to the fund. It's not all digital, mind: Apple Stores across five continents will be running (RED) promotions.

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ESA ExoMars TGO orbiter snaps first images using onboard instruments

ESA ExoMars TGO orbiter snaps first images using onboard instruments

The ESA Mars orbiter called ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) is on station in orbit around the Red Planet and has sent back the first images of Mars taken with its on-board instruments. The TGO is orbiting Mars in an elliptical orbit right now that brings the orbiter between 230 and 310 km above the surface of Mars to a farthest distance of around 98,000 km every 4.2 days. During its last two orbits it has been testing out its instruments and making calibrations as needed.

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Google Earth creates 30-year timelapses of climate change

Google Earth creates 30-year timelapses of climate change

Google has announced a new Google Earth Timeplapse feature, created in partnership with Time, that presents satellite imagery from 32 years of the Earth's surface in animations to show in detail how our planet is changing. Google Earth has added an additional four years of maps to what was available before, and now makes use of higher-resolution images that offer greater surface details, as well as animations with consistent color and quality.

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Battery breakthrough uses nuclear waste and man-made diamond to generate electricity

Battery breakthrough uses nuclear waste and man-made diamond to generate electricity

A new technology for creating batteries has been developed that might help eliminate some of the problems we have today with what to do with nuclear waste. The new battery could eliminate some of that nuclear waste while creating clean energy that can be used for many devices. The new technology involves the use of man-made diamond placed in a radioactive field.

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NASA’s plucky Cassini is about to buzz Saturn’s epic rings

NASA’s plucky Cassini is about to buzz Saturn’s epic rings

It's been a whirlwind adventure for NASA's Cassini spacecraft, beaming back incredible photos from Saturn over the past years, but its most exciting mission is almost upon us. The research probe has been surveying Saturn from different angles since 2004, along the way capturing shots of its moons and more, but now it's the turn of the planet's most notorious feature to get some attention. Cassini is about to buzz Saturn's rings.

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NASA: Mars’ hidden ice deposit has as much water as Lake Superior

NASA: Mars’ hidden ice deposit has as much water as Lake Superior

According to NASA, Mars is home to an ice deposit that has about as much water as Lake Superior. The ice deposit was found using the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s ground-penetrating radar, says the space agency, with the deposit itself being located in the planet’s Utopia Planitia region. The sheet of soil covering the ice deposit prevents it from being turned into water vapor.

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5,000 Dead fish frozen in ice skating rink in Japan’s “Space World”

5,000 Dead fish frozen in ice skating rink in Japan’s “Space World”

Space World theme park has shut down its first-ever 5,000-fish frozen in ice attraction, apologizing for breaking Japan's weird boundary. While strange, odd, or otherwise disgusting attractions aren't at all unheard of in Japan over the past several decades, it would seem that partially-protruding fish heads in ice aren't up to code. Space World's ice skating rink has been temporarily closed to remove the fish.

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MIT creates bendable artificial muscle fibers from nylon

MIT creates bendable artificial muscle fibers from nylon

Scientists have been trying to create fibers that could flex like human muscles for a long time with varying degrees of success. MIT scientists have created materials that are able to contract and expand in a manner similar to human muscle fibers that have many potential applications. These nylon fibers could find use in robotics, automotive, and aviation industries. The MIT breakthrough is on of the simplest and cheapest systems developed so far.

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Einstein’s speed of light constant could be proven wrong

Einstein’s speed of light constant could be proven wrong

Albert Einstein might be known for a great many things, but even the layman might be familiar with at least one thing: E = mc2, the formula for mass-energy equivalence. However, a critical part of that formula might soon be debunked. According to Einstein’s physics, light has, does, and always will travel at a constant speed. Some physicists and cosmologists have begun challenging that observation, and may just have gotten closer to proving that the venerable scientist may have been wrong.

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TIM robot keeps the Large Hadron Collider in tiptop shape

TIM robot keeps the Large Hadron Collider in tiptop shape

Robots might be thought of taking over human’s jobs or, in the future, the world, but their first real-world uses were in areas too dangerous for humans or for tasks that human physiology just isn’t equipped for. Such is the job of TIM, the Large Hadron Collider’s “security” robot. But unlike what you might think of a security bot, TIM doesn’t protect the LHC and its humans from external threats. Instead, it prowls the innards of the facility, monitoring for environmental dangers to one of the world’s most sophisticated scientific equipment.

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SpaceX wins contract to launch ocean-monitoring satellite for NASA

SpaceX wins contract to launch ocean-monitoring satellite for NASA

Despite their recent troubles over a rocket explosion, Elon Musk's SpaceX has won another contract from NASA to launch a satellite for the agency. April 2021 will see the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite sent into orbit on one of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rockets that's launched from California's Vandenberg Air Force Base.

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Schiaparelli lander’s mysterious crash partially solved

Schiaparelli lander’s mysterious crash partially solved

On 19th October, the European Space Agency rejoiced as its first ExoMars mission successfully completed one of two initial goals. The Trace Gas Orbiter was finally in orbit around its red planet target. However, rejoicing gave way to scratched heads and furrowed brows as the second part of that phase remained in question. The Schiaparelli lander had mysteriously vanished after it detached from the orbiter to land on the surface. Its remains were found three days later and now the ESA has released its initial findings on what may have caused its premature demise.

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