Science

Wireless sensors the size of dust could allow monitoring of organs and nerves

Wireless sensors the size of dust could allow monitoring of organs and nerves

Devices like the Fitbit are very popular today with their ability to monitor things about the wearer like their sleep habits, heart rate, and activity. In the future devices like the Fitbit might be able to do much more by using tiny wireless sensors that allow the monitoring of nerves and internal organs. These tiny wireless sensors are being developed by the University of California, Berkeley and are said to be the first dust-sized sensors that can be implanted into the body.

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New findings show constantly collapsing atmosphere on Jupiter’s moon Io

New findings show constantly collapsing atmosphere on Jupiter’s moon Io

We'd expect most new discoveries about Jupiter to be coming from the Juno spacecraft, which entered orbit around the planet early last month, but today we're hearing about a fascinating new find that Juno had nothing to do with. Scientists at the Southwest Research Institute have discovered that the atmosphere around Jupiter's moon Io is in a constant state of flux, collapsing and rebuilding once every day.

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Moon Express gets permission to land on the moon in 2017

Moon Express gets permission to land on the moon in 2017

Moon Express has made history as the first private enterprise to get U.S. government permission for traveling to and landing on the moon. The planned mission, which still has some hurdles to overcome and will be of the unmanned variety, is currently scheduled to happen next year, and will involve Moon Express putting a robotic spacecraft of some sort on the lunar surface. The approval has been a long time coming, and includes involvement from the White House, Federal Aviation Administration, NASA, and the State Department.

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Study review finds little evidence that flossing actually helps

Study review finds little evidence that flossing actually helps

One of the things that we have had to do most of our lives is floss our teeth. The dentist says that this is something you have to do to keep gums and teeth healthy. The federal government even pushes for people to floss their teeth along with the American Dental Association. The catch is that according to the AP after looking at 25 different studies comparing various oral care regimes, it found that there was very little evidence that flossing your teeth actually helps with gum and tooth health.

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The Earth is getting hotter: 2015 the new worst on record

The Earth is getting hotter: 2015 the new worst on record

This week the folks behind the "State of Climate" report (a yearly report) confirmed that 2015 was the hottest on record. Global heat level, greenhouse gases, and sea levels have all risen to record highs. According to the report, this year's findings are the result of both El Nino and global warming. The report also suggests that including carbon dioxide (CO2), methane, and nitrous oxide gasses rose to record high levels during the year 2015.

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Embattled Theranos Inc talks up new minilab test system

Embattled Theranos Inc talks up new minilab test system

Theranos is a heath technology firm that is having massive troubles right at this moment. It's CEO has been banned from running any lab facilities for two years and the company as a whole has been barred from receiving any Medicare or Medicaid payments, often a deathblow in the medical world. Despite all its troubles, Theranos is still trying to get new gear onto the market and its CEO Elizabeth Holmes has recently talked up the company’s new minilab.

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Solar cell turns CO2 into hydrocarbon fuel

Solar cell turns CO2 into hydrocarbon fuel

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have created a breakthrough solar cell that can be produced cheaply and is able to efficiently create a usable hydrocarbon fuel using carbon dioxide found in the air and sunlight. The new solar cell literally creates usable fuel from thin air and light. The scientists have reported their findings in the July 29 issues of Science.

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Skydiver sets record with 25,000ft jump using net instead of parachute

Skydiver sets record with 25,000ft jump using net instead of parachute

A skydiving world record was set in the California desert on Saturday as Luke Aikins became the first person ever to jump 25,000 feet without the use of a parachute, landing in a net positioned on the ground instead. The 42-year-old, with over 18,000 previous jumps under his belt, experienced two minutes of free-fall before landing in a net measuring 100-by-100 feet suspended with four 200 feet tall cranes.

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Apollo astronauts are dying from diseases caused by space radiation

Apollo astronauts are dying from diseases caused by space radiation

Florida State University Dean of the College of Human Sciences Michael Delp has detailed a sad reality affecting the Apollo astronauts: cardiovascular health issues caused by their exposure to space radiation. According to the study recently published in Scientific Reports, the astronauts who travelled into space as part of the lunar missions are largely suffering cardiovascular effects as a result, with 43-percent of the deceased individuals having died for reasons related to cardiovascular issues.

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Carcass leads scientists to new beaked whale species

Carcass leads scientists to new beaked whale species

A study newly published in Marine Mammal Science details evidence that a whale carcass discovered in 2014 is part of a species that has long gone undiscovered, at least in official capacities. Though new to science, fishermen have been aware of this particular variety of beaked whale for a while — Japanese fishermen, for example, call it karasu (raven) due to its somewhat dark color. However, living varieties of the critter have thus far evaded scientists.

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Motorized device helps infants at risk for cerebral palsy

Motorized device helps infants at risk for cerebral palsy

This may look like how Eleven started as an infant in Stranger Things, but it's actually a device that is designed to help infants who are at risk of developing cerebral palsy. This condition covers a range of early neurological disorders that affect movement and muscle coordination and can be caused from a number of factors. Those factors include brain damage during birth, infection, and trauma.

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New study shows cloned sheep are living long lives with few health problems

New study shows cloned sheep are living long lives with few health problems

Those of you who survived the roarin' 1990s will almost certainly remember Dolly the Sheep, who was created from a single adult cell that was combined with an egg cell that had been stripped of its DNA. In other words, Dolly was a clone. Dolly was all over the news when she was born in 1996, but soon after, she started to suffer from health problems, with many people assuming that she was facing these issues because she was a clone.

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