Science

MasSpec Pen detects cancer in seconds

MasSpec Pen detects cancer in seconds

People all around the world have surgeries each day to remove cancerous tissue from their bodies in an attempt to defeat the disease. The challenge for surgeons and medical personnel is to tell which tissue is cancerous and which is healthy so they know how much to remove. A team of scientists and engineers from the University of Texas at Austin has invented a new tool that will make it much easier for a surgeon to tell what tissue is cancerous and what is healthy during a surgery.

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Solar flares may bring stunning auroras for the rest of the week

Solar flares may bring stunning auroras for the rest of the week

The sun unleashed big solar flares earlier this week, and that was followed by two more yesterday morning. The first, which happened at 6:15AM for those in the Eastern time zone, was classified as a mid-level flare, while the second, which happened around 10:30AM, was a stronger X-class flare. Though the solar activity came with the annoying side effect of disrupted GPS, it could also cause incredible auroras throughout the rest of the week.

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Strongest solar flare in a decade were many times larger than Earth

Strongest solar flare in a decade were many times larger than Earth

The folks over at NASA are constantly watching the sun for many different reasons. One of those reasons is to capture video and images of the sun doing it thing. On September 6, 2017 the Sun tossed out the first of two incredibly powerful solar flares with the first flare peaking at 5:10 a.m. EDT and the second, and larger, solar flare peaking at 8:02 a.m. EDT. The Solar Dynamic Observatory captured images of both massive solar flares.

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Hoya Glass Substrates could usher in 20TB HDD era

Hoya Glass Substrates could usher in 20TB HDD era

Anyone who had been around PCs for long will remember the days when drive capacity was measured in megabytes and people thought that they would never use that much space. Then drives were in gigabytes and people thought the same thing again before the terabyte era came to be. Before HDDs can move into the 20TB range for storage capacity, a new type of substrate for the platters that actually store the data will come into play.

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Tonight’s Corn Moon will have Neptune in close proximity

Tonight’s Corn Moon will have Neptune in close proximity

Tonight will host the Corn Moon, the name given to the full moon that will reach its fullest point around 3AM Eastern time tomorrow morning. While the name evokes mental images of a moon colored yellow, that's not the case -- the name refers to the fact that corn is typically harvested around this time. For those wondering what happened to the Harvest Moon, it has been bumped to October this year.

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SpaceX successfully tests Falcon Heavy rocket’s first stage cores

SpaceX successfully tests Falcon Heavy rocket’s first stage cores

SpaceX first announced its Falcon Heavy — a much larger rocket than its standard Falcon 9s — back in 2011, and after several years of delays the private space company has scheduled its first launch for November. With that day quickly approaching, CEO Elon Musk and co. have revealed that things are on track with the news that they've successfully completed testing on Falcon Heavy's three first stage cores.

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This is how Neanderthals made glue from tree bark

This is how Neanderthals made glue from tree bark

Glue and other adhesives make life easier for everyone, and so it's no surprise that rudimentary forms of it can be traced back to ancient times. Whereas modern glue comes in many varieties for many purposes, ancient glues were made from natural substances, and the exact process that went into making the compounds isn't clear. A new study, however, may shed light on the answer.

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Motorized molecules use light to drill into and kill cancer cells

Motorized molecules use light to drill into and kill cancer cells

Researchers from the UK's Durham University and the US's Rice and North Carolina State universities have detailed a type of molecule that can kill off cancer cells by drilling directly into them. This drilling action is performed using rotors that spin between 2 and 3 million times a second, boring through the membrane of cells to bring about cellular death. The entire drilling action is made possible via ultraviolet light.

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Triceratops skull found in Colorado during construction work

Triceratops skull found in Colorado during construction work

Construction workers in Colorado have just made an incredible discovery: a triceratops skeleton including a skull, making it only the third triceratops skull discovered in the part of Colorado known as the Front Range. The skull and skeleton were buried for somewhere around 66 million years; the entire fossil hasn't yet been unearthed, but researchers are already excited.

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These futuristic NASA vehicle concepts may be used to explore Venus

These futuristic NASA vehicle concepts may be used to explore Venus

NASA has unveiled some probe concepts for spacecraft that may one day explore Venus, of which there are more than two dozen proposals. The concepts are for spacecraft and various types of probes that look different than what we've thus far sent into space, utilizing things like an 'origami' design to unfold robotic systems as necessary based on landscapes.

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17th century mummy sheds light on parasites in ancient Korea

17th century mummy sheds light on parasites in ancient Korea

Mummies dating back to the 17th century Joseon period in Korea are, by and large, excellently preserved thanks to a particular mummification process used during that time. One particular mummy, which was discovered in late 2014 in Cheongdo, is likewise expertly preserved and thanks in part to that, it has helped shed light on the nature of parasitic horrors that people had to deal with at that time.

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As destruction nears, Cassini takes a dip in Saturn’s atmosphere

As destruction nears, Cassini takes a dip in Saturn’s atmosphere

After spending 13 years studying Saturn and almost 20 years on its mission, NASA's Cassini orbiter is about to meet its end. Cassini's mission is scheduled to wrap up on September 15, but before it does, NASA is performing a series of final orbits it has dubbed Cassini's "Grand Finale." Those orbits began way back in April, but the orbit Cassini just entered might be the most fascinating one yet.

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