Science

Bill Nye Saves the World arrives on Netflix in April

Bill Nye Saves the World arrives on Netflix in April

Back in August, we heard that Bill Nye would be teaming up with Netflix to produce a new, science-focused show. '90s kids, remembering countless hours in science class watching Bill Nye the Science Guy, were immediately excited for this new premiere, but at the time of the announcement, Netflix was painfully short on details. All we were told is that the new series, called Bill Nye Saves the World, would launch sometime in 2017.

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This “fish-scale” lizard sheds its scale to escape

This “fish-scale” lizard sheds its scale to escape

Lizards are quite famous for their ability to voluntarily cut off and sacrifice their tail in order to escape with their lives. But for some types of lizards, that isn't the only thing they can shed. A specific genus named Geckolepis, endemic to Madagascar and the Comoro archipelago, also known as "fish-scale geckos", can also quickly remove their scales if needed, making them not only harder to capture but also harder to study. Which makes the classification of a new Geckolepis megalepis an even bigger accomplishment than it sounds.

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Ancient slug fossil reveals spiky ‘armor,’ hints about evolution

Ancient slug fossil reveals spiky ‘armor,’ hints about evolution

A newly published study details a unique-looking ancient slug that had a protective ‘armor’ composed of small spikes. This discovery helps shed light on the evolution of mollusks, revealing that they didn’t exactly have shells in the popular sense of the word, but weren’t entirely without protection, either. The fossils were found several years ago by an enthusiastic collector.

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5,000-year-old Chinese beer replicated using ancient recipe

5,000-year-old Chinese beer replicated using ancient recipe

Remember the ancient Chinese beer discovery publicized last year? It was a notable discovery for multiple reasons, including shedding light on agriculture in China at the time and giving modern humans an ancient recipe used to create beer. Now students at Stanford University have set out to recreate that beer, doing so following along with the ancient recipe. Some of the resulting beer was described as less than desirable, but others were successful.

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This “sensor pill” can be powered by your stomach acid

This “sensor pill” can be powered by your stomach acid

Electronic devices are invading every aspect of our lives and, soon, even our own bodies. Pills that contain sensors that transmit data from inside the human body have long been a holy grail for scientists and doctors but they have always been stumped by one critical part of the setup: the power source. Now researchers from MIT might have gotten one step closer by harvesting electricity from the most ubiquitous material inside our stomachs: our own stomach acid.

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Science confirms misophonia is a real condition

Science confirms misophonia is a real condition

Misophonia -- if you don't have the condition, it can be baffling when you run into someone who does. Individuals with misophonia have a severe intolerance for certain obnoxious sounds, such as gum being chewed loudly. Exposure to such noises provokes a nearly uncontrollable anger in so-called misophonics, a reaction some have tried to paint as irrational or fake. Science, it turns out, disagrees with that criticism, finding that misophonia is indeed a very real condition.

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NASA Gliders will gather weather data during flight

NASA Gliders will gather weather data during flight

NASA has introduced WHAATRR: the Weather Hazard Alert and Awareness Technology Radiation Radiosonde Glider. With this, the space agency says, weather data could be cheaply (relatively speaking) and quickly acquired for organizations that include the National Weather Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The glider could, potentially, save the National Weather Service $15 million in costs every year.

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US GAO voices concerns about SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket defects

US GAO voices concerns about SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket defects

An incoming report from the US Government Accountability Office could house safety concerns about SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket. The findings from this congressional investigation could threaten to delay SpaceX in its aggressive launch schedule. Those findings could also leave SpaceX's planned manned flights grounded until the uncovered issue is fixed.

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Boeing’s Starliner capsule will use 3D printed components

Boeing’s Starliner capsule will use 3D printed components

Boeing's CST-100 Starliner capsule won't start flying until next year, but when it does, a significant number of its components will be made through 3D printing. Boeing has recruited Oxford Performance Materials to produce around 600 parts for these space taxis, and these parts are offering some major benefits to Boeing without much in the way of negative trade-offs.

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Bat Bot is the drone you probably want to but can’t fly

Bat Bot is the drone you probably want to but can’t fly

If you think that flying robots are still science fiction, that’s probably because you may have not realized that the popular quadcopter drones are, technically speaking, flying robots. If that doesn’t meet your criteria of a robot and would prefer something less industrial looking, then you might be interested in B2 instead. Short for “Bat Bot”, B2 is a robot that tries to mimic, and learn from, the flying capabilities of bats, resulting in a contraption that is both fascinating and yet creepy at the same time.

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Flu ‘breathalyzer’ detects virus, not alcohol

Flu ‘breathalyzer’ detects virus, not alcohol

A professor with the University of Texas at Arlington’s Materials Science and Engineering Department has developed a breathalyzer of sorts that works by detecting the flu virus rather than alcohol. Such a breath monitor, as it is properly called, requires a patient to exhale into the mouthpiece, at which point sensors look for biomarkers pertaining to the flu virus, revealing whether the patient is ill.

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Frog saliva can be like water, then honey, then water again

Frog saliva can be like water, then honey, then water again

Frogs, among their other amphibious relatives, are popular, or notorious, for their rapid tongues that can seem to catch and hold on to any unwitting victim. But if you think its secret weapon is its tongue, you’d only be half right. Working secretly and almost invisibly is the frog’s reversible saliva. “Reversible” because it can switch from watery fluid to viscous honey-like liquid and back to watery form in a blink of an eye. And that is actually the secret of what makes frogs’ tongues so sticky.

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