Science

CYGNSS Microsatellites put in orbit to keep an eye on hurricanes

CYGNSS Microsatellites put in orbit to keep an eye on hurricanes

NASA has put some microsatellites into orbit to make a new constellation called Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System mission or CYGNSS. The microsatellites were put into orbit at 8:37 a.m. EDT on December 15 using an orbital ATK Pegasus XL rocket. This wasn't your typical launch where the rocket stands on a launch pad and soars into orbit under its own power.

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This giant planet has ‘stunning’ storm clouds made of rubies and sapphire

This giant planet has ‘stunning’ storm clouds made of rubies and sapphire

Researchers with the University of Warwick have detailed the discovery of a new planet called HAT-P-7b, an exoplanet that experiences violent storms. The planet definitely isn't inhabitable because of those storms, but it is notable for the same reason: the clouds appear to be made from corundum, the mineral that produces sapphires and rubies. Researchers say these clouds are likely 'visually stunning.'

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Scientists: help archive climate data before Trump presidency

Scientists: help archive climate data before Trump presidency

An effort is underway that highlights the sad state of climate change affairs: researchers are rushing to download and thus preserve climate change data ahead of Trump's presidency. Statements made by Trump -- followed by certain individuals he has nominated -- have raised serious concerns about the future of climate change research. There have been indications that NASA's Earth science division may be hard hit, among other things, and so researchers are scrambling to save the related government data now.

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No rare supernova, but a black hole ripping a star to shreds

No rare supernova, but a black hole ripping a star to shreds

What scientists initially believed was a rare supernova is now thought to be even more dramatic, a star ripped apart by a vast black hole. Researchers studying results from the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) thought they'd spotted something unusual enough back in January, when they identified what at the time was thought to be a superluminous supernova. Though it was 3.8 billion light years away from Earth, and thus invisible to the human eye, it was nonetheless twice as bright as any previously recorded supernova.

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Cornell University creates soft robotic hand that senses shape and texture

Cornell University creates soft robotic hand that senses shape and texture

Sometimes hands created for robots need to be very strong with the ability to grasp things very tightly and use them. Other times robot hands need to be very delicate to prevent any injury to humans they are working with or damage to fragile items they might be holding. Researchers at Cornell University have invented a hand for a robot that is able to grip things gently and can also sense the shape and texture of the item as well.

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Alzheimer’s treatment might someday just use flickering LEDs

Alzheimer’s treatment might someday just use flickering LEDs

Alzheimer’s disease is a growing cause for concern in the world today. In the US alone, about 5 million people are reported to be affected. And that number is predicted to grow even more in the very near future. And as there is no known cure for it, Alzheimer’s patients and their families are left to resort to treatments that are usually expensive and, in the long run, only temporary. Researchers at MIT, however, may have come across a possible new mode of treatment that shows promising results. And it involves nothing more than flashing LEDs lights at eyes.

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After Russian ISS resupply fails, Japan launches a rocket of its own

After Russian ISS resupply fails, Japan launches a rocket of its own

A Japanese cargo spacecraft has successfully blasted off for the International Space Station, set to deliver food, supplies, and other cargo early next week. It' the first attempt to restock the orbiting research platform since a failed Russian mission a little over a week ago, when an unmanned Progress MS-04 cargo spacecraft exploded around six minutes in. Luckily, the ISS' crew wasn't in any danger of going hungry.

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Scientists unearth fossilized tumor that’s 255-million-years-old

Scientists unearth fossilized tumor that’s 255-million-years-old

Scientists find neat things hiding in fossils all the time, but today they're sharing the discovery of a fossilized tumor that has them particularly excited. Why the fuss over a fossilized tumor? For starters, this tumor clocks in at an astounding 255-million-years-old.

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Feathered dinosaur tail found in Amber is the first of its kind discovered

Feathered dinosaur tail found in Amber is the first of its kind discovered

The chunk of amber seen in the first photo here is something very unique and unusual. It holds a segment of a feathered tail from a Cretaceous-era dinosaur along with an ant and various plant segments and other debris. The tail is the big draw though as it is the very first of its sort ever discovered.

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Drone blood deliveries deemed safe: emergency aerial transport is feasible

Drone blood deliveries deemed safe: emergency aerial transport is feasible

Researchers with Johns Hopkins University have determined that blood bag transport via drone is safe, according to a new university release. The team looked at both the cellular integrity and the temperature of the blood throughout the transportation process, finding that both were positive and the transported blood was safe to use. Such findings help pave the way for emergency blood transportation via drones.

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Astronaut John Glenn, first American to orbit Earth, dies

Astronaut John Glenn, first American to orbit Earth, dies

Today on the news that American hero John Glenn had died we gathered together a series of inspiring words from and about him. Perhaps the most famous of these is "Godspeed, John Glenn," spoken by mission controller Scott Carpenter as Glenn neared launch onboard Friendship 7 in February of 1962. That flight was part of NASA's Project Mercury and carried Glenn on three orbits around the Earth.

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Salto jumping robot mimics the African bushbaby

Salto jumping robot mimics the African bushbaby

The Biomimetic millisystems Lab at UC Berkeley is rather known for making small robots that mimic animals and so far Ron Fearing and his team have created some unique little robots. They have bots that can run, bots with wings, bots with tails, and hairy robots. The latest robot is a tiny thing that is hailed as the most agile robot ever made and it is designed to mimic a very cute animal that lives in Africa called the bushbaby or galago.

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