research

FDA considers gene therapy that may cure one type of blindness

FDA considers gene therapy that may cure one type of blindness

A new gene therapy treatment has proven effective at restoring vision for individuals suffering from a particular type of eye disease, and now the FDA is considering approving it. Should the treatment be approved, it will mark the first time gene therapy has been given the thumbs up to treat an inherited disease in the US...in this case, Leber congenital amaurosis, otherwise known as LCA.

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Researchers say ocean winds could power all of human civilization

Researchers say ocean winds could power all of human civilization

If you have ever been to a beach anywhere, you know that the wind blows constantly onto the land from the water. Researchers published a report this week that claims there is so much wind energy potential over the oceans that it could be used to generate "civilization scale power." The catch is that we would need to put ugly wind turbines all along the coast over huge areas of the sea.

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Australia’s big land lobster insect isn’t extinct after all

Australia’s big land lobster insect isn’t extinct after all

Australia's big and arguably ugly Lord Howe Island stick bug isn't extinct after all, researchers have revealed. The insect, which was found on the Australian island, was thought extinct following a shipwreck that happened in the early 1900s. A recent study, though, used DNA to confirm that bugs found on a volcanic outcrop are indeed this long-lost insect.

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MeTro glue is injected directly into wounds and seals in 60 seconds

MeTro glue is injected directly into wounds and seals in 60 seconds

In hospitals all around the world, wounds are sealed every day with surgical adhesives rather than stitches. A new type of surgical adhesive is being developed by researchers that could be used in emergency situations and in surgeries that is squirted directly into the wound called MeTro.

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Insecticides found in honey show major global threat to bees

Insecticides found in honey show major global threat to bees

Research looking at honey samples from around the global has highlighted the dangers a certain variety of insecticides pose for bee populations. Researchers found that out of nearly 200 honey samples, 75-percent of them tested positive for neonicotinoid insecticides. The study highlights the worldwide threat such pesticides pose for bee populations, which have been on the decline for years.

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This AR headset bakes eye-tracking right into its OLED displays

This AR headset bakes eye-tracking right into its OLED displays

Augmented reality and virtual reality headsets are proliferating, but now there's a system where the same tiny displays can be used as cameras to track eye-movement. Fraunhofer FEP has cooked up a new headset building on its latest bidirectional OLED microdisplays which, in addition to OLED pixels, have photodiodes sandwiched in-between. With those, the tiny screens can not only show data to the wearer, but watch where that person is looking too.

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Australia’s cats kill more than 1 million birds every single day

Australia’s cats kill more than 1 million birds every single day

Ordinary cats in Australia kill more than a million birds every single day, according to a newly published study. The findings were made by researchers from the Threatened Species Recovery Hub of the National Environmental Science Program after looking at evidence from more than 200 different studies. Overall, the majority of birds are killed by feral cats, but pet cats take out a substantial number on their own.

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GDF15: Monkeys and Mice gift humans with Stressful Weight Loss

GDF15: Monkeys and Mice gift humans with Stressful Weight Loss

Mice, Monkeys, and also Rats have given their lab-tested time and stress to a set of researchers searching for weight loss. What they found was a protein by the name of Growth Differentiation Factor-15, AKA GDF15 (also known as MIC-1). This protein was discovered by researchers from three different pharmaceutical companies and published in three papers, each independent of the other - that doesn't sound suspicious to you, does it?

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Researchers develop smart tattoos that use color changing ink for medical info

Researchers develop smart tattoos that use color changing ink for medical info

Researchers working together at Harvard and MIT have developed a new ink for tattoos that is able to monitor health and change color to warn of certain medical issues. The ink could change colors if the person is dehydrated or if the blood sugar rises. The inks used in the tattoos are biosensitive and the tech seeks to merge tattoo art with medical monitoring devices.

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Some Macs are missing updates, and you might never realize

Some Macs are missing updates, and you might never realize

An unexplained Mac issue has left thousands of Apple's computers potentially vulnerable to malware, though the Cupertino firm has downplayed the severity of the flaw. Researchers at Duo Security discovered that, while Apple had been diligent in upgrading macOS and security updates, the EFI - or Extensible Firmware Interface - was in some cases left unchanged. That, they point out, could open the door to those with nefarious intentions using loopholes in outdated firmware to hack a system.

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Bed bugs are attracted to unwashed clothes: study

Bed bugs are attracted to unwashed clothes: study

Bed bugs are a scourge that are difficult to spot before it is too late. Bring one home with you from a hotel or someone's home and you could be facing thousands of dollars to eradicate them. People have gone to great lengths to avoid them, including toasting luggage in a heating chamber. Science says there's a simpler solution, though: just wash your dirty clothes ASAP.

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Toyota’s new driverless prototype has a surprise inside

Toyota’s new driverless prototype has a surprise inside

Most driverless cars are aiming to do away with physical controls, which makes the fact that Toyota's latest autonomous vehicle has two sets all the more unexpected. The Toyota Research Institute (TRI)'s Platform 2.1 research vehicle gives March's big 2.0 update a sensor update, throwing in a new LIDAR laser scanning system. Arguably more important, however, is how the prototype melds different levels of driver-assistance together.

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