research

Alaskan salmon infected with Japanese tapeworm, CDC warns

Alaskan salmon infected with Japanese tapeworm, CDC warns

The Japanese broad tapeworm has been identified in Alaskan-caught salmon, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control, providing a good reason to think twice before eating any raw fish. The parasite, known as Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense, has been cited as responsible for about 2,000 cases of known human infections, the vast majority of them in Japan, South Korea, and similar regions.

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The world’s tightest knot is too small to see

The world’s tightest knot is too small to see

A group of researchers have achieved a new record, but you can’t see it with the naked eye. Scientists with the University of Manchester have formed the tightest knot to ever grace our blue marble, at least as far as humans are aware, and they did so using molecular strands. Though the final knot is only about 20 nanometers long, it could lead to the creation of new, more advanced materials.

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Researchers use salmonella to attack deadly brain cancer tumors

Researchers use salmonella to attack deadly brain cancer tumors

Researchers with Duke University have detailed a new project in which salmonella was successfully tapped to target cancerous brain tumors. According to the university, biomedical engineers set their sights on a solution for one of the deadliest forms of brain cancer, the glioblastoma. Patients have only a 10-percent chance of surviving five years following their diagnoses of this cancer, but a potential new treatment may double those numbers.

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ESO Very Large Telescope upgrade will search Alpha Centauri for planets

ESO Very Large Telescope upgrade will search Alpha Centauri for planets

The European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) will soon search Alpha Centauri for planets thanks to an upgrade that’ll be funded via a Breakthrough Initiatives agreement. The ESO announced the new agreement on Monday, saying the funds will be used to upgrade the Very Large Telescope’s VLT Imager and Spectrometer for mid-Infrared tool. The ultimate purpose of this upgrade is using the VLT to search for habitable planets.

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3D graphene is lighter than steel but ten times stronger

3D graphene is lighter than steel but ten times stronger

Yes, that is almost an oxymoron but almost a material scientists’ dream come true. A material that has 10 times the strength of steel, one of the hardest man-made materials, and yet also just 5% of its density. But that is precisely what researchers at MIT might have just accomplished by taking graphene, believed to be the strongest materials in existence, and forming it into a structure that resembles a coral more than a bar of steel.

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Carpooling can cut traffic congestion by 75%, MIT study

Carpooling can cut traffic congestion by 75%, MIT study

Ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft have been in the news a lot lately, but mostly because of their run ins with authorities and regulators. Few have probably given deep thought, not to mention devout an entire scientific paper, on their impact at large, for good or for ill. But that is exactly what researchers at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) accomplished under the charge of Professor Daniela Rus. They developed an algorithm that showed that carpooling service can potentially reduce road congestion up to three times and, in the long run, even save our environment.

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Researchers: bad ‘magic mushroom’ trips may still be beneficial

Researchers: bad ‘magic mushroom’ trips may still be beneficial

So-called magic mushrooms are the source of renewed scientific interest in psilocybin, particularly the beneficial effects the chemical may have on helping terminal cancer patients accept impending death, among other things. Researchers recently published the results of a large survey they conducted with magic mushroom consumers, one in which they specifically looked for details about bad trips and their lasting effects.

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Study: office workers can ditch standing desks by taking short walks instead

Study: office workers can ditch standing desks by taking short walks instead

There seems to be three stages involved in owning a standing desk. First, you feel enthusiastic about your renewed work environment and optimistic about its effects on your health. Soon enough, though, you start to feel distracted by the discomfort of standing all the time. Then, finally, you acknowledge that humans invented chairs for a reason and return to your previous sedentary ways. According to a new study, that's fine: there's a suitable alternative to standing desks.

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Study: 40% of Americans use their phone within 5 minutes of waking up

Study: 40% of Americans use their phone within 5 minutes of waking up

A new global mobile consumer survey details technology trends from the U.S. as noted throughout 2016, and among them are details about how US techies use their phone. Most notably, about 40-percent of Americans check their smartphone within five minutes of waking up in the morning. That number grows over the minutes following, with most people checking their phone within an hour of waking up, and continuing to check it dozens of times throughout the day.

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Sorry folks, science says hands-free calls are still a big driving distraction

Sorry folks, science says hands-free calls are still a big driving distraction

Hands-free technology is largely viewed as the solution to phone-addicted drivers, but another study has surfaced that disagrees. According to QUT’s study, which utilized the CARRS-Q Advanced Driving Simulator as part of its research, hands-free phone use while driving is still quite a distraction, delaying reaction time significantly compared to those who weren’t using any phones, hands-free or otherwise.

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New medical ‘breathalyzer’ detects diseases via a patient’s breath

New medical ‘breathalyzer’ detects diseases via a patient’s breath

A new type of medical technology can detect 17 different diseases by ‘sniffing’ an afflicted patient’s breath, according to the American Chemical Society. The technology was inspired by the now-dated diagnoses method used by doctors before the advent of modern medical labs — sniffing a patient’s breath for signs of a particular disease. The technology is essentially a disease breathalyzer.

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Researchers develop nanodiscs to deliver personalized cancer therapy

Researchers develop nanodiscs to deliver personalized cancer therapy

Researchers from the University of Michigan have reported success in cancer research with mice using a new delivery method for therapies called nanodiscs. The researchers were able to use the nanodiscs to deliver a customized therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of colon and melanoma cancer tumors. Personalized immunotherapy is a growing field of research for cancer treatments.

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