news

Blue Origin wants to prep a delivery service for humans on the moon

Blue Origin wants to prep a delivery service for humans on the moon

NASA is looking into returning to the moon, and companies are scrambling to get in on that action. One such company is Blue Origin, which anticipates setting up a delivery service of sorts near the moon’s south pole. Such a service would utilize solar power and function as a lunar cargo delivery service, taking supplies to the moon where they could then be utilized by future humans landing on and living on the moon.

Continue Reading

Uber eats humble pie, applies for California self-driving permit

Uber eats humble pie, applies for California self-driving permit

When told it had to get a self-driving permit to operate its autonomous vehicles in California, Uber puffed its chest out and, like a petulant child, packed up its fleet and went to Arizona instead. That happened very recently, just a few days before Christmas 2016, but the ride-hailing company has already relented: it will be applying for the proper permit to operate its self-driving cars on California roads, something it should have done the first time around.

Continue Reading

The oldest fossils ever may have been found in Canada

The oldest fossils ever may have been found in Canada

Researchers have discovered what might end up being the oldest fossils ever found, it has been announced, ones that fall into the so-called “microfossils” designation. You can’t see these tiny fossils with the naked eye, as they are the fossils of microbes from the ancient world. Their exact age isn’t known, but they’re estimated to be — at minimum — 3.77 billion years old, eclipsing the previous confirmed 3.5 billion year old microfossils.

Continue Reading

Wireless arm patch reduces migraine pain without meds

Wireless arm patch reduces migraine pain without meds

A new study out of Neurology reveals that a wireless patch could be a simple way to reduce the pain of migraines, being just as effective as drugs. The patch is designed to be worn on one’s arm, where it then produces electrical stimulation that disrupts pain signals before they can get to the brain. Users are able to control the patch using a related smartphone app. Unlike medication, this wireless patch has no side effects, says researchers.

Continue Reading

Spotify Hi-Fi music tier tipped with lossless audio

Spotify Hi-Fi music tier tipped with lossless audio

The days of low-quality audio streaming may be behind us, at least as far as Spotify is concerned. Screenshots from the service have appeared online detailing a not-yet-available “Spotify Hi-Fi” service that gives users access to lossless CD-quality audio for an additional $5 or $10 per month. Users aren’t yet able to sign up for the service and the pricing seems inconsistent at this time.

Continue Reading

Amazon AWS outage means the Internet is down

Amazon AWS outage means the Internet is down

If you’ve had some trouble accessing certain (read: many) services and websites today, you’re not alone. Amazon Web Services (AWS) is experiencing problems with its us-east-1 region of data centers, and that is causing some major outages and headaches for companies relying on the service. Major websites and online services are being affected, including ones like Quora, Trello and more.

Continue Reading

Researchers urge caution over bringing back extinct species

Researchers urge caution over bringing back extinct species

News of researchers’ efforts to bring back the long-extinct wooly mammoth has caught the public’s attention, and while the prospect is interesting, many are against it. That project in particular has its own controversies, such as whether it is ethical to bring back a creature that will have no social group of its own, but the entire de-extinction project as a whole is also not without its potential issues.

Continue Reading

Svalbard doomsday seed vault gets huge (and critical) seed deposit

Svalbard doomsday seed vault gets huge (and critical) seed deposit

The so-called ‘doomsday’ seed vault located in the Arctic on the small, cold nation of Svalbard has received what is described as a large and major deposit of seeds. According to The Crop Trust, which oversees the vault, the deposit was made on February 22, and is a necessary part in ‘ensuring global food security.’ Almost 50,000 seeds from countries all around the world were added.

Continue Reading

Artificial intelligence used to detect very early signs of autism in infants

Artificial intelligence used to detect very early signs of autism in infants

It’s difficult to diagnose infants with autism due to trouble determining whether any behavioral traits common to autism are present. This difficulty is most pronounced before the age of two, and especially before the age of one, resulting in delayed diagnoses. All that may be changing, though, thanks to artificial intelligence and its ability to predict with high accuracy which infants will be diagnosed with autism by their second year.

Continue Reading

Study: Neanderthal genes are still affecting humans

Study: Neanderthal genes are still affecting humans

Neanderthals haven’t existed for the better part of 40,000 years, but their genes continue to affect present day humans in important ways. According to a new study, Neanderthal DNA resulting from the mating of Neanderthals with humans is still active in 52 varieties of human tissue, influencing gene expression. This influence includes things like making people taller and reducing one’s odds of developing schizophrenia.

Continue Reading

Tiny sea snail venom found to contain powerful non-opioid painkiller

Tiny sea snail venom found to contain powerful non-opioid painkiller

Opioid painkillers are up to the task of tackling pain, but they also come with a terrible side effect: a very high potential for severe addition that can be hard to break. The medical community has long sought alternatives to opioids that would be as effective while eliminating or reducing the addiction potential, and now researchers may have found that alternative. It comes, oddly enough, from the venom of a tiny sea snail.

Continue Reading

New map shows US bee decline is happening in vital growing zones

New map shows US bee decline is happening in vital growing zones

The bee population is declining, and it has scientists concerned. This isn’t a new revelation, and indeed conservation efforts have been underway to increase wild populations. The latest bit of research on this issue, though, highlights how troublesome the matter is: it comes in the form of a map, the first of its kind, and shows that bee declines are happening primarily in the nation’s most vital agricultural zones, putting necessary crops at risk.

Continue Reading

Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Next