medical

Upcoming Theranos movie will star Jennifer Lawrence as CEO

Upcoming Theranos movie will star Jennifer Lawrence as CEO

One of the recent trends we've seen in Hollywood is movies based on drama surrounding Silicon Valley companies. We've had movies based on the origins of Facebook as well as Steve Jobs, and now the medical startup Theranos, the subject of many regulatory investigations, is next. It looks like the yet-untitled film is getting some real acting talent too, with Deadline recently reporting that actress Jennifer Lawrence will be playing Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes.

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Theranos ‘Voids’ Tens of Thousands Of Blood Tests, Casts Doubt On Edison Device

Theranos ‘Voids’ Tens of Thousands Of Blood Tests, Casts Doubt On Edison Device

Sometimes, when a medical technology appears to be too good to be true, it actually is. Witness the debacle that has dogged Theranos Inc. and its promise of being able to run multiple blood tests based on very small samples using its proprietary Edison device. In the fall of 2015 it was revealed by the Wall Street Journal that Theranos, which had parlayed Edison into a $9 billion stock market valuation, was actually making use of traditional blood analysis machines and procedures while it awaited FDA approval of Edison itself. Now, the WSJ is reporting that Theranos has 'voided' two years of Edison blood tests.

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New blood glucose monitor replaces finger pricks with microwaves

New blood glucose monitor replaces finger pricks with microwaves

The future holds a lot of promise for diabetics, not the least of which is because of the more advanced glucose monitors researchers have been creating. There's the Patch monitor, a band-like wearable that sticks on the skin to keep track of sugar levels. Similar but suitably different is a new contraption created by researchers at Cardiff University's School of Engineering -- a small device that attaches to the skin and uses microwaves instead of finger pricks to check sugar levels.

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This ultra-thin electronic skin puts a digital display on your body

This ultra-thin electronic skin puts a digital display on your body

Smartwatches and fitness device may be the wearables of today, but in the not-too-distant future we be using super-thin skin-like membranes that can put a digital display right on the surface of our bodies. University of Tokyo researchers are bringing us closer to such a future, as they've been developing a new type of electronic skin, or e-skin, that is nearly as flexible and stretchy as the real stuff, but has the benefit of putting polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) on your hand or anywhere it's applied.

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DARPA wants ‘shape-shifting’ vaccines that evolve with viruses

DARPA wants ‘shape-shifting’ vaccines that evolve with viruses

Vaccines are great, but they’re no match for most viruses in play at any given time. This is due largely in part to the ever-changing nature of viruses and the expense and difficulty in developing new vaccines to target them. DARPA wants that reality to change, citing the numerous concerning viruses, past and present, that affect humanity. Under the “INTERCEPT” program, DARPA seeks “shape-shifting” vaccines that adapt to kill off viruses as they evolve.

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Fitbit Charge HR helped a doctor make a life-saving decision

Fitbit Charge HR helped a doctor make a life-saving decision

Remember the Apple Watch that helped save a teenage athlete's life? Well, now it's the Fitbit's turn to make such a sensational news. A Fitbit Charge HR's heart rate monitor data was used by a doctor to determine it was safe, in fact critical, to reset a man's heart rate using electrical cardioversion. While it still remains pretty much the exception rather than the norm, it does show the growing sophistication of such fitness-equipped wearables to the point that they can provide essential information that could help save people's lives.

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Study finds robotic Paro seal is therapeutic for dementia patients

Study finds robotic Paro seal is therapeutic for dementia patients

A study conducted by Front Porch Center for Innovation and Wellbeing has found that therapeutic robots — in this case, Paro the robotic seal — can help calm and comfort elderly individuals afflicted with dementia. The study observed 920 instances where Paro provided some type of therapeutic effect for dementia patients, “improving the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia and reducing the usage of psychotropic medications,” said Paro designer Dr. Takanori Shibata.

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Drones will deliver meds in Rwanda starting this summer

Drones will deliver meds in Rwanda starting this summer

Zipline, a California startup, will soon start supplying remote areas of Rwanda with medical supplies via drone-based drop shipments. The shipments will begin in July, and will be made possible using fixed-wing drones able to travel many miles. Zipline will operate the service for the nation’s government, and will be able to get much-needed supplies, like emergency medication, to remote regions within a single day rather than the weeks or months other methods can take.

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NASA sending fungi into space to study drug development

NASA sending fungi into space to study drug development

A team of researchers from NASA and the University of Southern California will be the first in the world send fungi into space with the goal of developing medical drugs. The fungi, which are known to produce molecules called secondary metabolites, will hitch a ride to the International Space Station aboard a SpaceX rocket scheduled to launch on April 8th. Secondary metabolites can be used to create beneficial medicine for humans, such as the antibiotic penicillin.

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New blood test detects concussions days after they happen

New blood test detects concussions days after they happen

Concussions are a serious problem in the world of sports, particularly when it comes to youth sports — concussion symptoms are sometimes delayed in children (less commonly in adults, as well), meaning an evaluation immediately after an incident may not accurately reflect the nature of the injury. Researchers have discovered a way to deal with this, developing a new type of blood test that can identify whether someone has suffered a concussion up to a week after it happened.

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Samsung brainBAND tracks concussions in athletes

Samsung brainBAND tracks concussions in athletes

Samsung Electronics Australia has rolled out a new bit of tech called the brainBAND that is designed to help coaches and medics keep up with concussion injuries in athletes. The brainBAND is a wearable device and the prototype was developed via the Samsung Launching People program that puts a pair of researchers from different backgrounds together to see how tech can help solve challenges in society.

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Patch monitors glucose levels and delivers meds to control glucose

Patch monitors glucose levels and delivers meds to control glucose

Anyone who has been around a diabetic that has to prick their fingers multiple times a day to check their blood glucose levels can understand in an instant just how difficult and annoying the disease can be. Factor in the need for some diabetics to not only prick fingers to check glucose levels, but to give themselves shots of insulin to control the blood sugar and things only get worse for diabetics. Scientists have developed an innovative medical device that might make diabetes less of a prick.

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