Medical Gadgets

FDA guides makers on securing connected medical devices

FDA guides makers on securing connected medical devices

The FDA has released a draft guidance for companies that make connected medical devices, advising them of steps that should be taken to deal with cybersecurity risks. The guidance concerns medical devices that connect to a facility’s network, and comes at a time when an increasing number of companies — medical and otherwise — have been hit with massive data breaches.

Continue Reading

Myo gesture control band controls MPL prosthetic arm

Myo gesture control band controls MPL prosthetic arm

The Modular Prosthetic Limb has suddenly become a lot more versatile as the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory-developed prosthetic works with the Myo armband. The Myo armband is a gesture-control accessory that allows people to control all manner of devices and software as it senses movements in their arm*. Muscles expand and contract and the armband sends signals wirelessly to other devices. In this case, it means that the armbands are able to give this MPL arm movement.

Continue Reading

MC10 “BioStamp” connects to your body, shares data

MC10 “BioStamp” connects to your body, shares data

Amid waves of wearables at CES 2016, MC10 have revealed the BioStamp Research Connect System. This system works with a sort of soft stamp, or sticker, that sticks to your body and shares physiological data with computers. These flexible body-worn sensors allow the wearer to operate entirely normally as they bend and move with the body, rather than hindering it. This system reduces observation error at the same time as it improves data capture, so says MC10.

Continue Reading

Derby the Dog gets new prosthetics

Derby the Dog gets new prosthetics

Prosthetic limbs are common for humans who are injured are born with some sort of deformity that limits their mobility and ability to live, work, and play. Prosthetics for animals and pets are becoming more and more common as well. One such pet is Derby the dog who got a new lease on life a while back with prosthetic paws that allowed him to walk and run again.

Continue Reading

Smart-Drive MX2 turns normal wheelchairs into power chairs

Smart-Drive MX2 turns normal wheelchairs into power chairs

In the world of medical equipment, there is a huge gulf between the price and portability of a normal standard wheelchair and a powered wheelchair designed to help people get around with less effort. Many people can't afford to pay for a normal power wheelchair and insurance doesn't always help and they are hard to transport. A new device has debuted called the Smart-Drive MX2 and it is an electric drive unit to attach to a normal wheelchair.

Continue Reading

DARPA’s new prosthetic limb lets paralyzed man feel objects

DARPA’s new prosthetic limb lets paralyzed man feel objects

Prosthetic limbs have become nearly science fiction-like in their sophistication, allowing the human mind to control robotic arms and hands in a way similar to how one controls their own limbs. DARPA is counted among the research entities developing this technology, and it has recently taken it a step further, using neurotechnology to enable a paralyzed individual to "feel" objects through a prosthesis. The prosthetic is sensitive enough that sensations touching each finger could be discerned individually.

Continue Reading

9-year-old gets ‘awesome’ gesture-controlled bionic arm

9-year-old gets ‘awesome’ gesture-controlled bionic arm

Josh Cathcart is a nine-year-old boy who was born missing a portion of his right arm, something that resulted in bullying and made life harder for him. Those troubles have been greatly minimized thanks to a new bionic arm from Touch Bionics, making him the first kid in the United Kingdom to get one of the company’s i-limb quantum prosthetics. The arm is functional, allowing him to grip items as small as LEGOs and do things for himself that he previously had trouble doing. This is said to be the first prosthetic hand able to alter its grip using gestures.

Continue Reading

Prick-free way to monitor glucose might be the future

Prick-free way to monitor glucose might be the future

Diabetes is nothing to take lightly but many of its life-threatening dangers can be avoided by vigilance. Sadly, despite our hi-tech age, monitoring blood sugar levels still feels almost medieval, drawing a drop of blood to feed into portable glucometers. Luckily, science and technology might be on the verge of coming up with less invasive means to measure glucose levels. At the University of Leeds in the UK, a small device utilizes lasers to do all the measuring, and it's low-powered enough not to do any damage to your skin, much less prick it.

Continue Reading

App aims to save lives by diagnosing pneumonia earlier

App aims to save lives by diagnosing pneumonia earlier

In many parts of the world, there aren’t enough doctors to take care of people leading to higher mortality rates. A team from Makerere University in Uganda was the only African team to win in the 2014-2015 Big Ideas Contest organized by the University of California Berkeley. The device that the team won with tied for second place in the contest and is an app and cell phone combo designed to aid in detecting pneumonia early.

Continue Reading

Google develops health wearable for medical, research tracking

Google develops health wearable for medical, research tracking

The unmonitored period between doctor visits can make it difficult for medical professionals to adequately treat patients with chronic issues, and to fill that void are various medical gadgets designed to monitor some aspect of one's daily life or health metrics. Google has decided to enter that market with a new health wearable, one that will be targeted at doctors and those performing clinical trials rather than the average consumer. The wearable was developed by Google X.

Continue Reading

BrainPort V100 allows the blind to see using their tongue

BrainPort V100 allows the blind to see using their tongue

A device that sounds very strange has won FDA approval to come to market. The device is called the BrainPort V100 and it is a sensory substitution device that is designed to give the blind vision of a sort. Seeing in this case is done via an electrode that stimulates the tongue of the user. The FDA cleared Wicab, the maker of the device, to bring it to market last week.

Continue Reading

Bioengineered bacteria change color in urine to indicate diseases

Bioengineered bacteria change color in urine to indicate diseases

Science is going to great lengths to harness the ability to detect disease before it can wreak havoc on the human body. From a cancer detecting bra, to a smartphone accessory that can detect HIV, new medical gadgets are making it easier to identify what ails us. Recently, researchers have decided to do away with the gadgetry altogether, letting bacteria do the work. These new, mutant bacteria are bioengineered to detect specific diseases, and change the color of the patient's urine for a fast diagnosis.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13