legal

Call of Duty creator Activision cleared for depicting Humvees in-game

Call of Duty creator Activision cleared for depicting Humvees in-game

You often see disclaimers in videos or games that similarities to real-life people are purely coincidental in a work of fiction. There are times, however, when such content is intentionally designed to bear similarities to real-world people or objects. Sometimes those are products of licensing agreements and partnerships. AM General, the maker of one of the most identifiable military vehicles in the world, wanted something along those lines when it sued Activision for putting Humvees in Call of Duty games. A judge, however, ruled that the game developer has a First Amendment right to do so.

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Trump invokes Defense Production Act: Here’s what that means for coronavirus

Trump invokes Defense Production Act: Here’s what that means for coronavirus

COVID-19 in the USA was the reason for President Donald Trump's invoking of the Defense Production Act (DPA). This act was originally put in place by President Truman during the Korean War, and has been changed significantly since then. As laid out in the last major change of provisions in the act, in a CRS (Congressional Research Service) Report for Congress by Daniel H. Else, Specialist in National Defense, on May 14, 2009, "DPA authorities are not permanent."

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A new way to run Android on an iPhone

A new way to run Android on an iPhone

This week the folks at Corellium released Project Sandcastle, a method with which an iPhone can run Android. It's not especially simple, and it doesn't really run like a full-fledged Android phone would, but it's real. The hack comes courtesy of Chris Wade and his associates, who've released this bit of software amid a legal row with Apple for their creation of software versions of the iPhone "for security and testing."

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Apple could pay $25 per iPhone in throttling settlement

Apple could pay $25 per iPhone in throttling settlement

Apple will pay as much as $500 million to settle angry iPhone owners, who had accused the company of secretly throttling their smartphones in early 2017. The controversy was a side-effect of Apple's attempts to work around problems caused by aging batteries, and which had already seen the Cupertino firm discount battery replacements for existing owners.

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US indicts Huawei on tech theft and racketeering charges

US indicts Huawei on tech theft and racketeering charges

The US government has filed an indictment against Huawei and its Chief Financial Officer, alleging intellectual property theft, financial fraud, and racketeering by the Chinese firm and its management. The superseding indictment was revealed on Thursday, February 13, and targets Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. along with two US subsidiaries. CFO Meng Wanzhou - who is currently awaiting confirmation on whether she will be extradited from Canada to the US in order to face charges - is also named in the indictment.

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Common charger vote sees EU ignore Apple’s Lightning protest

Common charger vote sees EU ignore Apple’s Lightning protest

The European Union has voted to approve a common charger standard, despite Apple's protestations that it could hamper innovation, and now aims to fast-track the rule in the name of cutting down on e-waste. The new regulation comes after years of the EU hoping that manufacturers would voluntarily adopt charger standards, only to find those hopes frustrated.

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London police are rolling out a controversial facial recognition system

London police are rolling out a controversial facial recognition system

Police forces in London, UK, have confirmed they will be switching on controversial Live Facial Recognition (LFR) systems, aiming to spot known criminals or suspects in crime hotspots around the city. The system will be able to flag individuals on a watch-list, picking known faces out of the crowd.

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Opera resorts to questionable loan apps as browser market share tanks

Opera resorts to questionable loan apps as browser market share tanks

Back in the days when phones weren't exactly smart, the only way people could browse the Web was often through Opera. In the age of smartphones and Google Chrome, however, Opera has become almost a legacy, a legacy that might soon be tarnished by the company's own actions. It turns out that Opera is using what can only be described as predatory loan apps on Android to make a profit but could, in turn, get it banned from Google Play Store for good.

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Europe’s war on chargers could give Apple an iPhone problem – or an opportunity

Europe’s war on chargers could give Apple an iPhone problem – or an opportunity

European rules demanding a universal charger could force Apple to ditch its Lightning cable - or hasten its transition to an entirely wireless world for the iPhone that many believe has been the Cupertino firm's goal all along. Proposed laws being considered by the European Union would compel all electronics-makers to standardize on a single connector, in the name of avoiding unnecessary waste.

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New EV-Ready building codes could be tipping point for electric cars in US

New EV-Ready building codes could be tipping point for electric cars in US

Electric car charging regulations that could eventually see all new-build homes in the US be made "EV-ready" have been approved, with updated standards adding provisions for faster chargers to be installed. Currently, though California has mandated electrical wiring for EV chargers be included in its building codes since 2015, the rest of the US has no such requirements.

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Apple sued again over Apple Watch for trade secrets theft

Apple sued again over Apple Watch for trade secrets theft

Given how the Apple Watch has been making headlines for saving lives, it's no surprise that it is, pardon the pun, apple picking for those who want to capitalize on its fame or, in this case, have gotten hurt by it. Just before the year ended, Apple was hit by a lawsuit over its unlicensed use of a patent for its atrial fibrillation detection. Now it is getting slapped by an even bigger complaint for stealing trade secrets related to health monitoring on its Apple Watch.

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Microsoft Project Artemis will scan chats for signs of child exploitation

Microsoft Project Artemis will scan chats for signs of child exploitation

Just as the Internet empowered people by connecting them to knowledge and to one another, it has sadly also empowered less conscientious individuals in carrying out illegal activities in anonymity. Sexual exploitation, especially those of minors, is one of the long-standing problems for both authorities and Internet companies and its complexity defies conventional solutions. Microsoft is rising to the challenge with a new tool called Project Artemis will try to look for signs of online grooming that could lead to child exploitation.

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