healthcare

Mayo study finds Electronic Health Records less user-friendly than Excel

Mayo study finds Electronic Health Records less user-friendly than Excel

Using the System Usability Scale (SUS) in a major study published this week, Mayo researchers found modern Electronic Health Records (EHR) to be less user-friendly than Microsoft Excel. EHR got an SUS score of 45, which also ranks below GPS (maps), Amazon, and ATMs. At the top of the scale - Google search.

Continue Reading

Coway Airmega 200M Air Purifier Review: Breathing easy

Coway Airmega 200M Air Purifier Review: Breathing easy

It only takes a few smoky days for the idea of an air purifier like the Coway Airmega 200M to seem like a mighty sensible one. With California once again ablaze in parts, air pollution has gone from being an annoyance to a real health hazard in places, and bringing it under control - without breaking the bank in the process - is a legitimate concern.

Continue Reading

E-Cigarette Vaping EVALI lung injury and death count update

E-Cigarette Vaping EVALI lung injury and death count update

We've been following the outbreak of lung injury associated with the use of e-cigarettes (vaping) since early August. On September 19, 2019, the FDA opened a criminal probe into the vaping-related lung injury outbreak, while the CDC's then-current case count was 530 people - this count has gone up considerably since then.

Continue Reading

Ebola vaccine approved by WHO for first time ever

Ebola vaccine approved by WHO for first time ever

Ebola is now officially preventable and treatable. Today the World Health Organization (WHO) prequalified an Ebola vaccine for the first time in the history of the world. The Ervebo vaccine is now recommended by the WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) as a key tool in treating Ebola, as it's been officially shown to be effective in protecting humans from the Ebola Zaire virus.

Continue Reading

Kyocera unveils world’s first gyro-based portable carbohydrate monitor

Kyocera unveils world’s first gyro-based portable carbohydrate monitor

When talking about the convergence of consumer electronics and health, most will probably think of wearables like fitness trackers and smartwatches. These do often have a variety of sensors used to track vitals like heart rate or, in the case of the Apple Watch 4, ECG. But while these devices do give wearers an idea of their activity and heart health, they lack data on one important factor in fitness. That is why Kyocera has made a new system that can monitor your carbohydrate intake but is also small enough to slip into your pocket.

Continue Reading

Dyson Pure Cryptomic purifiers promise to oust formaldehyde

Dyson Pure Cryptomic purifiers promise to oust formaldehyde

Dyson's sculptural air purifiers are getting a new model, with the new Dyson Pure Cryptomic adding formaldehyde removal to their talents. Tucked inside the cylindrical body is a new catalyst panel, which Dyson says can take harmful formaldehyde and convert it into harmless water and carbon dioxide.

Continue Reading

Google bans ad sales for unproven medical treatments

Google bans ad sales for unproven medical treatments

Google announced a new Google Ads Policy that targets unproven or experimental medical techniques. Google Ads revealed a new Healthcare and medicines policy that prohibits the advertising of "unproven or experimental medical techniques such as most stem cell therapy, cellular (non-stem) therapy, and gene therapy."

Continue Reading

Fitbit Aria Air smart scale trims the price tag

Fitbit Aria Air smart scale trims the price tag

There's only so much your smartwatch can tell you, so Fitbit has launched a new - and, maybe more importantly, cheaper - smart scale to add weight and BMI information to your overall health picture. The Fitbit Aria Air joins its more expensive siblings with a sub-$50 price tag, promising Bluetooth connectivity to your smartphone and the ability to measure and track multiple fitness metrics.

Continue Reading

Your drugs can work better: One simple life hack

Your drugs can work better: One simple life hack

There's ample evidence to suggest that taking medications at the same time of day each day increases efficacy, a study published this month in Science suggests. Researchers have poured over fifty years of clinical trials that considered and evaluated time-of-day administration of drugs. Over 100 clinical trials, 70 distinct drugs or combinations or medical procedures across 15 different therapeutic areas were studied. Of these, 75% found that "treatment efficacy or toxicity depended on dosing time."

Continue Reading

Apple’s next big thing is in the mind

Apple’s next big thing is in the mind

Apple is ramping up to a revolution in the way you live your life. Right now the most ironic paradox in most people's lives is the complete lack of motivation they feel for keeping their body healthy. I know I feel that way - it seems like a lot of work. I've got a hard enough time trying to act on things I know are right, I've got ADHD, now you want me to remember that going for a bike ride makes me feel good the rest of the day? Madness!

Continue Reading

Apple Watch may be able to detect signs of dementia, brain decline

Apple Watch may be able to detect signs of dementia, brain decline

Apple has slowly but surely been turning its Apple Watch into a tiny medical lab, equipping it with various sensors to paint a picture of the wearer's health and medical condition. There is no shortage of anecdotes and testimonies of how every new Apple Watch feature has saved lives, either through diagnosis or prognosis. Most of those, however, come from the usual heart-related sensors and measurements. A new study, however, is now looking into whether the Apple Watch can also be used to determine the wearer's mental health as well.

Continue Reading

Obesity fix bacteria revealed in 2 breakthrough studies

Obesity fix bacteria revealed in 2 breakthrough studies

A report released this week showed newly discovered gut-colonizing bacteria that "protect against obesity." These bacteria were connected directly to metabolic disease and the "diverse communities of intestinal bacteria." These communities of intestinal bacteria, also known as microbiota, "can influence whether obesity develops or not" in the human body.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4