facial recognition

Intel RealSense ID promises Face ID-style security for ATMs and smart locks

Intel RealSense ID promises Face ID-style security for ATMs and smart locks

Intel has launched a new facial recognition system, aiming to bring Face ID-style biometric access to ATMs, smart locks, and more. Intel RealSense ID pulls together an active depth sensor to scan the user's face, with a special neural network running on a local chipset for increased security without PINs, passwords, or having to scan your fingerprint.

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August and Yale smart locks can now use fingerprints, faces for security

August and Yale smart locks can now use fingerprints, faces for security

Smart locks have been offering hi-tech ways to secure our homes but their apps ironically only provide old and less secure ways of securing access to those locks. Many phones these days provide biometric security in the form of face recognition and fingerprints to have a more accurate and foolproof way to gain access to a smartphone or files. Finally, August and Yale smart locks can now take advantage of these same technologies but the feature comes with one important catch.

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Another major US city bans use of facial recognition for surveillance

Another major US city bans use of facial recognition for surveillance

Another major city in the United States, Boston, has banned the use of facial recognition technology for surveillance purposes, stating that not only does this tech trample 'on everyone’s rights to anonymity and privacy,' but it also enforces systemic racism and makes it easier for communities to target minorities. Boston joins five other regions in Massachusetts that have also banned their respective governments from using these systems.

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Amazon puts police use of facial recognition tech on hold for a year

Amazon puts police use of facial recognition tech on hold for a year

From the very start, there have been concerns about how facial recognition technology was being made available too easily to "the right people" with the privacy safeguards often provided by laws. Recent events in the US seem to have been the rude awakening that both companies and lawmakers needed to rise to the challenge of regulating the use of this potentially invasive technology. Since that will take time, however, tech companies like IBM and now Amazon is temporarily putting a stop to these technologies are at least in providing these tools to law enforcers.

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