environment

Popular pesticide leaves honey bees vulnerable to deadly mites

Popular pesticide leaves honey bees vulnerable to deadly mites

A commonly used class of pesticides may be preventing bees from properly grooming themselves, leaving them vulnerable to deadly mites, according to a new study out of the University of Guelph. This milestone research is the first to associate the behavioral change with neonicotinoid pesticides, highlighting yet another concerning issue that may influence future limitations on the product's use.

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Oil-eating bacteria has been discovered in the deepest part of the ocean

Oil-eating bacteria has been discovered in the deepest part of the ocean

Researchers with the University of East Anglia have reported a unique discovery: bacteria that eats oil in one of the most mysterious parts of our planet. The microscopic critters were discovered in the Mariana Trench, the deepest ocean trench in the world. According to the study, the Mariana Trench has the highest proportion of oil-eating bacteria on Earth.

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Pregnant whale dies after consuming nearly 50lbs of plastic trash

Pregnant whale dies after consuming nearly 50lbs of plastic trash

Last week, a dead sperm whale was discovered washed up near the shore of a popular tourist spot in Italy. The whale was pregnant at the time of its death, according to officials, and a necropsy revealed almost 50lbs of plastic waste in its stomach. News of the death comes only days after a whale near the Philippines was found deceased with similar stomach contents.

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Earth Day with Pokemon GO: A chat with Niantic about Civic & Social Impact

Earth Day with Pokemon GO: A chat with Niantic about Civic & Social Impact

In 2019, Niantic's got another Earth Day campaign planned. In a manner similar to 2018, Niantic and masses of gamers - Pokemon GO and Ingress included - will head out and clean up the planet. In 68 events and with "countless NGOs" taking part in the celebration, 6.5 tons of garbage were collected - and presumably put into landfills, mostly - but still, progress!* Here in 2019 we had a chat with Niantic's Civic & Social Impact Manager, Yennie Solheim Fuller, to see what the future holds.

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The Deliverator compact EV brings green deliveries to cramped cities

The Deliverator compact EV brings green deliveries to cramped cities

Arcimoto has launched pre-orders for the Deliverator, a three-wheeled electric vehicle designed specifically for deliveries. The vehicle has a 100-mile range and a top speed of 75mph, making it more substantial than the small autonomous delivery buggies some other companies have introduced. The model offers better efficiency than traditional delivery trucks, however.

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Philippines whale died after eating 88lbs of plastic garbage

Philippines whale died after eating 88lbs of plastic garbage

Earlier this month, workers with the D'Bone Collector Museum in the Philippines recovered the remains of a beaked whale that had appeared near Davao City. In its most recent update about the deceased animal, the museum revealed the whale's cause of death: the ingestion of approximately 88lbs of plastic. The materials were primarily composed of plastic bags, including shopping bags and rice sacks.

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Australia may have no more winter by 2050

Australia may have no more winter by 2050

Depending on where you live, winter can either be a time to escape the heat for a bit or a sad string of months spent buried in snow with bitter cold. If you are in Australia, a new tool created by Dr. Geoff Hinchliffe and Associate Prof. Mitchel Whitelaw from the School of Art & Design with help from the ANU Climate Change Institute predicts you may only have a few more decades to worry about winter. According to the tool, there will be no more winter in Australia by 2050.

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Study finds global fisheries shrinking due to climate change, overfishing

Study finds global fisheries shrinking due to climate change, overfishing

The effects of climate change have been well proven in areas like weather patterns and animal habitats, but a new study highlights how the same problems are found in our oceans, with rising sea temperatures having a significant impact on the world's fisheries. Led by Rutgers, the research shows that critical fisheries have seen at least a 4% drop in populations since 1930, with certain areas experiencing as much as a 35% decline.

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Scientists make coal from CO2 in climate change alchemy

Scientists make coal from CO2 in climate change alchemy

Scientists have revealed a new process that turns carbon dioxide back into coal, offering a potential way to capture the greenhouse gas and sequester it from the atmosphere. This is the first time researchers have developed a way to transform carbon dioxide into solid carbon particles, adding it to the list of existing technologies and breakthroughs involving carbon capture and storage.

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NASA says an iceberg twice the size of NYC is about to break off

NASA says an iceberg twice the size of NYC is about to break off

NASA has revealed that an Antarctic ice shelf that has been observed for decades is about to have a large iceberg break free. This chunk of ice has about twice the area of New York City with a visible crack that scientists have monitored using aerial images. Human presence on the Brunt Ice Shelf, which is where the cracks are located, was first established back in 1955, according to NASA.

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World’s largest bee rediscovered after two samples appeared online

World’s largest bee rediscovered after two samples appeared online

After nearly four decades, researchers have rediscovered the world's largest bee which, until now, was believed to be extinct. Called Wallace's giant bee, this creature is about the size of a human thumb, black in color, and was first discovered in the mid-1850s. Scientists last saw the bee alive in 1981, but that changed recently thanks to a team of researchers in northern Indonesia.

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It’s official: Climate change killed a mammal

It’s official: Climate change killed a mammal

Australian government officials made it official this week: this little creature is extinct. A statement was released by federal Environment Minister Melissa Price, changing the government's status for Bramble Cay melomys (Melomys rubicola) from endangered to extinct. This is the first time in history a mammal was made extinct due directly to human-made climate change. It's a little mouse and it's dead now because of us.

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