Earth

Researchers say Earth’s core is soft

Researchers say Earth’s core is soft

When I grew up, I was told that our planet's core was made of lava - and that I'd never be able to dig through the planet to get out the other side. I was misinformed. While it still seems that I cannot tunnel through the planet (with the tools I have in my garage), the inner core of our planet Earth is apparently solid. Researchers Associate Professor Hrvoje Tkalčić and PhD Scholar Than-Son Phạm of The Australian National University (ANU) published a paper on the subject this week.

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The biggest organism on Earth is dying

The biggest organism on Earth is dying

It may look like a simple forest, albeit a huge one, but the Pando aspen clone is actually one vast organism, and the bad news is that it's dying. Spread across more than 100 screws in Aspen, the forest - also known as "the Trembling Giant" - is in fact all interconnected by a single root system, and has lasted for thousands of years.

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Climate change is making Earth wobble more as it spins

Climate change is making Earth wobble more as it spins

The Earth, as many of us are (hopefully) already aware, rotates on its own axis, and that rotation serves as the basis for our 24-hour day. However, the Earth doesn't exactly experience what can be described as a smooth rotation, as it wobbles as it spins. Scientists with NASA have discovered new causes of this spin-axis drift, dubbed "polar motion," and it seems that climate change is behind one of the three.

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LUCA: Study says life came not long after first planet impact

LUCA: Study says life came not long after first planet impact

A new study suggests that life on Earth is far older than science once suspected. The scientific world's been relying on the oldest known fossils to date the start of life on this planet - they've been doing this for ages. This sort of science works, but because its source material changes, it's not entirely accurate. A study published this week combines both fossil and genome science to date our ancestors well beyond what's been found in the ground.

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Massive diamond cache may be hidden 100 miles below Earth’s surface

Massive diamond cache may be hidden 100 miles below Earth’s surface

Diamonds are expensive, but not terribly rare. A new report indicates that Earth may have a truly massive cache of them located about 100 miles beneath the Earth's surface, a depth that is too deep for present drilling technologies. The discovery was made using seismic activity data, which revealed an anomaly with sound waves passing faster than expected through part of the Earth's interior.

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Study: banned ozone-destroying gas may still be in production

Study: banned ozone-destroying gas may still be in production

A chemical banned due to the harm it causes the ozone layer may be secretly in production somewhere in the world. Scientists speculate the illicit compound may be in use despite the ban due to increased levels, its presence ultimately harming efforts to restore the Earth's atmosphere. Some scientists speculate that the substance is likely being produced in East Asia.

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Pokemon GO Earth Day events aim to clean up litter worldwide

Pokemon GO Earth Day events aim to clean up litter worldwide

This week the folks at Niantic revealed their first ever Earth Day event for Pokemon GO. This event aims to bring all the Pokemon trainers to the yard where they'll pick up all the trash on the planet. Or at least all the trash at a select number of "cleanup events" in several countries around the world.

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NASA asks public to share cloud photos to help confirm satellite data

NASA asks public to share cloud photos to help confirm satellite data

NASA has revealed it's using a rare strategy to help verify data from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES): asking the public for help. The space agency says its satellites sometimes have difficulty identifying and separating clouds, so it's having citizen scientists submit photos of clouds from the ground in order to compare data.

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This vast comet impact changed Earth forever with firestorms

This vast comet impact changed Earth forever with firestorms

Fragments of a 62 mile comet plunged Earth into a vast firestorm, scientists claim, with millions of square miles consumed by fire. The inferno took place roughly 12,800 years ago, new research has theorized. While it was, until now, effectively unknown, the scientists believe the comet's impact was greater than that which caused the dinosaurs to go extinct.

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Surprise: Steam rocket man’s flat-Earth flight grounded

Surprise: Steam rocket man’s flat-Earth flight grounded

Remember last week when we told you about "Mad" Mike Hughes, a self-proclaimed flat-Earther who decided to build a steam-powered rocket and use it to launch himself 1,800 feet up? That launch -
which was also going to serve as the rocket's first test - was scheduled for this past Saturday, November 25. As people who have been following this news closely since last week can tell you, the launch never actually happened.

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NASA space photo shows stunning green Earth after Midwest floods

NASA space photo shows stunning green Earth after Midwest floods

The Midwestern states have been slammed with storms in recent days leading to massive flooding in many areas. While the floods are tragic, the rain's overall effect on the Midwest landscape is stunning. New NASA photos of Earth taken from space show multiple Midwestern states covered in a thick blanket of bright green leaves and grass, covering the center of the country with a huge swath of fertile, robust vegetation. The photos hint at a promising summer as far as crop growth is concerned.

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The physical Brexit study: how close to Pangea?

The physical Brexit study: how close to Pangea?

A study has been conducted which shows when England began to break away from Europe physically, creating the Dover Strait. Using bathymetric maps to study the bottom of the sea, scientists have discovered a lot more than what's previously been known about the area and the sequence of events that created today's topography. Britain, it turns out, was connected to the mainland (last time it was connected, that is) via a chalk ridge that kept a giant proglacial lake in check - until disaster struck.

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