dinosaur

Dinosaur Games: Mud Dragon strikes out in ancient pit

Dinosaur Games: Mud Dragon strikes out in ancient pit

Tongtianlong limosus, the Mud Dragon, was caught in sticky mud in China over 66 million years ago - and died there. Of course it wasn't called China back then, and this was when our planet looked a lot different from what it looks like today. But back between 66 and 72 million years ago, the Mud Dragon gasped its last. Not long after the death of the Mud Dragon, our Earth changed drastically.

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Scientists discover first known fossil of dinosaur brain tissue

Scientists discover first known fossil of dinosaur brain tissue

What you see above might not look like much more than a small rock, but it marks a huge first in the field of paleontology: it's the first known example of a dinosaur brain tissue fossil. Originally discovered in Sussex, UK, it's believed to have come from a species similar to the Iguanodon, a large herbivore, roughly 133 million years ago.

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New dinosaur species Savannasaurus discovered in Australia

New dinosaur species Savannasaurus discovered in Australia

Back in 2005, researchers found dinosaur bones in Queensland, Australia, and now many years later there's more information about them: they belong to a newly discovered dinosaur species dubbed Savannasaurus elliottorum, a type of long-necked dino called a sauropod. The fossilized remains are notable for many reasons, one being that it’s the most complete sauropod skeleton ever found in the land down under. And, of course, there’s that part about it being a whole new species.

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Study aims to determine if ancient dinosaurs really could roar

Study aims to determine if ancient dinosaurs really could roar

Thanks to movies like Jurassic Park we all think of dinosaurs as having incredibly loud roars. Scientists aren't sure if the actual dinosaurs that these movies aim to represent could roar. The reason for this is that it is incredibly hard to find ancient dinosaur voice boxes because they didn't fossilize well. What dinosaurs would have used to make vocalizations would have been one of two different structures called a larynx or a syrinx. Most living land-dwelling vertebrates today use a larynx to vocalize, this is a structure mostly made of cartilage that makes sounds at the back of the mouth.

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Fossilized dinosaur footprint sets record with massive 3.5ft length

Fossilized dinosaur footprint sets record with massive 3.5ft length

Researchers have discovered one of the largest fossilized dinosaur footprints in existence, with it measuring about 42-inches in length and 30-inches in width. The discovery was made in Mongolia’s Gobi Desert by researchers from Mongolian and Japanese institutions who were on a joint project. According to these researchers, the footprint may have come from a herbivorous long-necked titanosaur, a massive dinosaur that may have been more than sixty feet tall and nearly one hundred feet long.

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Dinosaur-age bird wing discovered in amber jewelry market

Dinosaur-age bird wing discovered in amber jewelry market

Bird skin, claws, muscle, and feathers have been discovered in amber dated to nearly a hundred million years ago. Researchers suggest that these bits and pieces of birds show how coloring and arrangement of bird feathers has remained largely the same for a very, very long time. Wing tips is what they have. A very strange (but apparently not entirely uncommon) origin story is what they've got to tell.

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New reptile species discovered with 250 million year old fossil

New reptile species discovered with 250 million year old fossil

A team of scientists have discovered a fossilized reptile skull dating back 250 million years, revealing not only evidence of a new species, but connections to the origins of dinosaurs as well. The skull, found by paleontologists from universities in Brazil and the UK, is well-preserved and features a number of serrated teeth, and is said to have survived a mass extinction event that occurred roughly 252 million years ago, eradicating 90% of life on Earth.

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Study finds that dinosaurs may have evolved much faster than previously thought

Study finds that dinosaurs may have evolved much faster than previously thought

To understand our world and its future, we often must look to the past. Clues about the evolution of the planet and its inhabitants are scattered in the ground, which helps unlock the mysteries about the past. Unfortunately, sometimes deciphering those clues can be difficult, and the smallest error in calculations can put the dates of events off by millions of years, as one group of researchers recently found.

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Newly discovered dinosaur footprints reveal they once roamed Scottish lagoon

Newly discovered dinosaur footprints reveal they once roamed Scottish lagoon

Researchers recently uncovered Scotland's largest dinosaur site when they came across hundreds of dinosaur footprints dating as far back as 170 million years. The site was found near the Isle of Skye, along the nation's shore, with data indicating the footprints were left in the Middle Jurassic period, when the area was a sandy, saltwater lagoon. Not only do scientists know what kind of dinosaur left the footprints, but that they were likely walking in shallow water when the prints were made.

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South Dakota was once home to giant raptors

South Dakota was once home to giant raptors

The fossilized remains of one of the largest raptors ever have been discovered in South Dakota. The discovery was made by Palm Beach Museum curator of vertebrate paleontology Robert DePalma and a team in Harding County at Hell Creek Formation. The fossils are of a partial skeleton belonging to the giant raptor dubbed “Dakotaraptor steini”, a member of the dromaeosauridae family.

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T-Rex study shows how terrifying dinosaurs’ jaw truly was

T-Rex study shows how terrifying dinosaurs’ jaw truly was

A study on the Tyrannosaurus rex, one of the most widely-known and loved dinosaurs in our short history, shows that this beast had a magnificent set of chompers. T-rex is shown by paleontologist Dr Stephan Lautenschlager to possess a sustained muscle force for a wide range of jaw angles. T-rex and a couple of other theropod dinosaurs were studied, showing the maximal jaw gape of the beloved thunder-lizard's jaw to be a whopping 63.5-inches. And that's not even the widest a theropod's jaw got.

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Dinosaur eggs change perceptions of blood connections to birds

Dinosaur eggs change perceptions of blood connections to birds

A new study on dinosaur eggs sheds light on a 150-year-old debate over the warm- or cold-bloodedness of the thunder lizard. Late Cretaceous titanosaurid eggshells were studied and contrasted with oviraptorid eggshells, both of which yield clumped isotopes that allowed scientists to compare thermophysiology of these extinct species to their modern-day counterparts. With these studies, determinations can be made on the body temperatures of females during periods of ovulation. Body temperatures of these species indicate that, as the study suggests, "not all dinosaurs had body temperatures in the range of that seen in modern birds", dousing previous suspicions of the opposite.

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