copyright

EU court rules embedding video is not copyright infringement

EU court rules embedding video is not copyright infringement

A landmark ruling was made recently in the EU by the Court of Justice and the ruling has to do with online copyright. The court ruled that embedding copyrighted videos is not copyright infringement, even if the source of the video uploaded it without permission. The case had been referred to the Court of Justice by a German court and had to do with a water filtering company called BestWater International and two independent commercial agents working for a competitor.

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Moderator: Reddit profited from leaked celeb pics

Moderator: Reddit profited from leaked celeb pics

The leaked celebrity photo scandal has many angles by which to consider it troubling. On one hand, iCloud being hacked is alarming, and that raised eyebrow came well ahead of wondering who was responsible or why they’d even do such a thing. Now it seems Reddit, where many saw the pics initially, actually profited greatly from the event.

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Insisting free-speech, reddit kills explicit celeb pic forums

Insisting free-speech, reddit kills explicit celeb pic forums

Reddit has finally taken down the much-criticized forums which shared and re-circulated stolen explicit celebrity photos, including Jennifer Lawrence and others, though the site's management are at pains to portray it as a copyright issue, not one of free speech. The continued availability of the leaked images, believed to have been extracted from iCloud backups using hacked and stolen credentials, had prompted demands by some that reddit change its stance on what could and could not be published.

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Sorry, monkey photographers, you can’t hold copyright

Sorry, monkey photographers, you can’t hold copyright

The controversy over the monkey selfie has forced the US Copyright Office to step in, clarifying that no photo taken by an animal - even a cute one like this Indonesian black macaque - can be registered. The smiling simian had borrowed photographer David Slater's camera back in 2011 for an impromptu shoot, images from which ended up on Wikimedia Commons, which the British traveler contested on copyright grounds.

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Monkey’s selfie has caused a copyright row

Monkey’s selfie has caused a copyright row

A rather attractive macaque became Internet famous a few years ago for the two images you see above -- both of which he took himself, perhaps becoming the first monkey to take a selfie, in addition to creating a problematic question in the process: who owns the copyright?

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Aereo pleads for mercy, says they’re “bleeding to death”

Aereo pleads for mercy, says they’re “bleeding to death”

“The company is figuratively bleeding to death.” That was how Aereo described themselves to the US District Court in Manhattan in a filing late last night. The company, recently dealt a death-blow by the Supreme Court, is hemorrhaging cash, and wants the courts to allow them to operate like a cable company.

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Copyright Office: Supreme Court was right about Aereo

Copyright Office: Supreme Court was right about Aereo

Aereo is putting up a valiant effort, but they’ve been dealt another major blow in their fight to stay alive. The US Copyright Office has ruled that Aereo cannot be deemed a cable company under the terms of the Copyright Act. This comes after a Supreme Court ruling which effectively dug Aereo’s hole for them.

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Aereo CEO responds to ruling, but what’s next?

Aereo CEO responds to ruling, but what’s next?

Ahead of I/O yesterday, the Supreme Court ruled on a case that marked a significant point in Aereo’s future. In their ruling, the Supreme Court effectively said the way Aereo does business violated the Copyright Act. Aereo’s CEO has responded to the Supreme Court ruling, and his full response is below.

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Supreme Court’s Aereo ruling is a knockout blow to service

Supreme Court’s Aereo ruling is a knockout blow to service

Aereo, the service challenged the status quo of TV as we know it, has been dealt a massive setback. The Supreme Court has ruled Aereo violates the Copyright Act, all stemming from the way Aereo operates. The 6-3 ruling all but kills off Aereo, at best forcing them to pivot into a new business model.

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Popcorn Time shuts down shortly after launch

Popcorn Time shuts down shortly after launch

Popcorn Time surfaced earlier this week and was quickly labeled "the Netflix of piracy", providing easy access to illegal movies via a sophisticated-looking app. Fast-forward a few days after its launch, and the service's app has been taken down, with the folks behind it saying "the experiment has come to an end."

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Megaupload search warrant deemed legal in Kim Dotcom arrest

Megaupload search warrant deemed legal in Kim Dotcom arrest

The legal saga of Megaupload and its founder Kim Dotcom has been going on for a long time now. Earlier in the case, the warrant that was used to arrest Dotcom at his New Zealand mansion was ruled illegal. Some video from that raid on the Dotcom mansion was made available back in 2012. The legality of that warrant has still been fought over to this day.

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EU court says hyperlinking doesn’t constitute copyright infringement

EU court says hyperlinking doesn’t constitute copyright infringement

The Court of Justice of the European Union has handed down a ruling this week that was an important one for the internet as we know it. The court was hearing a case that had to do with whether or not the act of hyperlinking to content online constituted copyright infringement. If the court had ruled that linking to content was in fact copyright infringement, it would have changed the internet in a fundamental way.

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