CERN

CERN approves 62-mile super-collider: now it just needs $23bn to pay for it

CERN approves 62-mile super-collider: now it just needs $23bn to pay for it

The European Organization for Nuclear Research, more commonly known as CERN, has approved an ambitious plan to build a 62-mile super-collider in the pursuit of expanding humanity's knowledge of physics. The endorsement came from the CERN Council today, June 19, with costs expected to hit a minimum of €21 billion (approx. $23.5 billion). CERN, of course, is best known for its work involving the Large Hadron Collider.

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CERN to move away from Microsoft because license fees have skyrocketed

CERN to move away from Microsoft because license fees have skyrocketed

Windows may still be the operating system on desktops and laptops, by choice or not, but Microsoft's biggest profit comes from the wholesale licensing of the OS on enterprise, government, and educational computers. Those, however, are slowly losing ground especially with the latter two categories. That has mostly been because of the increasing costs of Windows licenses. That has caused not only governments but even CERN, the world's largest particle physics laboratory, to move away from Windows and proprietary software at large.

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Large Hadron Collider shuts down for two years of upgrades, maintenance

Large Hadron Collider shuts down for two years of upgrades, maintenance

CERN is shutting down the Large Hadron Collider (LHD) for two years in order to make "major improvements" to the system. All experiments and the accelerator complex will end during these 24 months, giving experts time to upgrade the system before the next round of work. CERN has scheduled its next LHC run for 2021, when it will end the current Long Shutdown 2.

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End of the universe predicted to the day

End of the universe predicted to the day

The Higgs Boson subatomic particle may yet be the end of all human life. Not necessarily because the scientists at CERN's Large Hadron Collider made a life-ending mistake smashing all the atoms - but because of an outside force. To put it all very simply: We've got a whole lot of time left on our hands before the universe is obliterated.

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CERN sees Antimatter Spectrum for first time in history

CERN sees Antimatter Spectrum for first time in history

Spectral information on antimatter has been obtained by researchers for the first time in the history of science. This was made a reality over the course of a 20-year study using the ALPHA experiment at CERN. This team was lead by Dr. Ahmadi of the Department of Physics at the University of Liverpool, and the study will play a big role in further understanding matter and energy in a variety of scientific disciplines well into the future.

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ALPHA records first ever measurement of optical spectrum of antimatter atom

ALPHA records first ever measurement of optical spectrum of antimatter atom

ALPHA published a paper in the journal Nature this week that reports the first ever measurement of the optical spectrum of an antimatter atom. The team behind the paper says that this is the result of over 20 years of work by the CERN antimatter community. The measurements are of the antihydrogen spectrum and were performed with high-precision according to the team.

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TIM robot keeps the Large Hadron Collider in tiptop shape

TIM robot keeps the Large Hadron Collider in tiptop shape

Robots might be thought of taking over human’s jobs or, in the future, the world, but their first real-world uses were in areas too dangerous for humans or for tasks that human physiology just isn’t equipped for. Such is the job of TIM, the Large Hadron Collider’s “security” robot. But unlike what you might think of a security bot, TIM doesn’t protect the LHC and its humans from external threats. Instead, it prowls the innards of the facility, monitoring for environmental dangers to one of the world’s most sophisticated scientific equipment.

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Large Hadron Collider experiment finds new class of particles

Large Hadron Collider experiment finds new class of particles

The Large Hadron Collider team has announced the discovery of a new class of particles called pentaquark. A paper detailing the discovery has been submitted to the journal of Physical Review Letters. The finding was made during an LHCb experiment, and follows past experiments where evidence of pentaquarks were inconclusive. This time around, says CERN, the latest experiment was successful because it essentially searched “with the lights on, and from all angles" rather than "in the dark" like past efforts.

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Large Hadron Collider’s big restart: stable beams and success

Large Hadron Collider’s big restart: stable beams and success

It's time to celebrate - the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has re-started for the first time in over two years. What's more - after two years of repairs and several months of re-commissioning, the LHC is ready to roll with record energy. Today's live recording of events through CERN shows how it all went down, from the ramping of counter-rotating beams of protons to an energy level of 6.5 TeV to the start of data taking in this session, it's all here today. Now starts the session at which an unprecedented amount of energy is run - 13 teraelectronvolts (13 TeV)!

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