archaeology

More monkey teeth say ancient ocean rafting was a real possibility

More monkey teeth say ancient ocean rafting was a real possibility

We thought the subject of the research published this week seemed familiar. Back in the year 2016, SlashGear featured a story on the possibility that ancient monkeys crossed a large body of water to move from one continent to another. Now, here in 2020, a new finding ancient monkey teeth has a completely new set of researchers suggesting that a different set of monkeys ALSO made a trip across a large body of water to live in a new land.

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Researchers found the oldest piece of string

Researchers found the oldest piece of string

A group of researchers found the world's oldest piece of string ever strung by a humanoid. This very, very old piece of string was found in a cave in France and described in the journal Scientific Reports. The string was likely constructed and used by Neanderthals at least 41-thousand years ago. This is a very significant piece of old string.

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This 550m-year-old jelly bean-like creature is ancestor to all humans

This 550m-year-old jelly bean-like creature is ancestor to all humans

A new bit of research published by the National Academy of Sciences showed evidence of one of the first creatures on this planet with a mouth and a butt. More specifically, this fossil called Ikaria wariootia, is one of the oldest known bilaterians. A bilaterian is an animal with two openings and a trough-gut.

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How ostrich eggshell beads fueled one of humanity’s first social networks

How ostrich eggshell beads fueled one of humanity’s first social networks

Thirty-three thousand years ago, on the southern tip of the continent Africa, ostrich eggs were carved into beads and kept as ornamentation. These beads held value - they weren't just worn around necks for fun. As research published this week shows, humans shared these beads with one another, allowed these beads to play a significant role in their life - especially when it came to the reaffirmation of important relationships.

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How a meteorite destroyed one of humanity’s first settlements

How a meteorite destroyed one of humanity’s first settlements

To the South of Turkey, to the West of Iraq, to the North of Saudi Arabia and the Northeast of Egypt is a country called Syria. This country is home to a site of some major historical, cultural, and evironmental significance. This site was one of the first known human settlements on earth: Abu Hureyra. A report from researchers from UC Santa Barbara showed that this site may very well have been annihilated by the cosmic impact of a well-placed comet.

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Farmer finds stone, reveals lost king-toppling society

Farmer finds stone, reveals lost king-toppling society

A slab of stone the size of a small child was discovered in southern Turkey with clues pointing to a lost civilization. "My colleague Michele Massa and I rushed straight there, and we could see it still sticking out of the water, so we jumped right down into the canal—up to our waists wading around," said Asst. Prof. James Osborne of the Oriental Institute. "Right away, it was clear it was ancient."

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Five lion cub mummies found in Egypt: Do you know this cat goddess?

Five lion cub mummies found in Egypt: Do you know this cat goddess?

For only the second time in modern history, mummified lions were discovered in an ancient human tomb. This tomb was uncovered 500 kilometers south of Saqqara, Egypt, at the Bubasteion necropolis near Luxor. This is the second major announcement from the Egypt Ministry of Antiquities in the area, the first of which was nearby at the Assasif necropolis, where 30 ancient coffins were discovered with human remains sealed within.

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