archaeology

Researchers discover an ancient Roman road in the Venice Lagoon

Researchers discover an ancient Roman road in the Venice Lagoon

It's widely known that parts of the modern world that are underwater were, in the distant past, dry land. Recently, researchers discovered a Roman road submerged in the Venice Lagoon. The finding suggests that extensive settlements may have been present in the Venice Lagoon centuries before the founding of Venice in the fifth century.

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Scientists extract DNA from mummified 1600-year-old sheep leg

Scientists extract DNA from mummified 1600-year-old sheep leg

The team of geneticists and archaeologists from Ireland, France, Iran, Germany, and Austria have been able to sequence DNA from a mummified 1600-year-old sheep. The sheep was found in an ancient Iranian salt mine known as Chehrābād. The specimen is highly interesting for archaeologists because it reveals sheep husbandry practices of the ancient Near East.

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World’s oldest Neanderthal art released as 3D file for free

World’s oldest Neanderthal art released as 3D file for free

Back about 51,000 years ago, a Neanderthal decided they would express their artistic soul to work on a piece of deer bone. This individual resided in what's now known as Northern Germany's Harz Mountains. Not only did this ancient artist have the capacity to carve a pattern into bone, they knew enough about the physical properties of the bone to use hot water to make its surface soft enough to carve.

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Remains of a 3000-year-old shark attack victim discovered in Japan

Remains of a 3000-year-old shark attack victim discovered in Japan

A team of researchers led by archaeologists from Oxford have published a new paper revealing the discovery of a 3000-year-old shark attack victim. The remains show that the person was attacked by a shark in the Seto Inland Sea of the Japanese archipelago. The discovery of the 3000-year-old remains is the earliest direct evidence for a shark attack on a human.

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Archaeologists discover a fossilized intact chicken egg in Israel

Archaeologists discover a fossilized intact chicken egg in Israel

If you've ever made eggs for breakfast, you know that chicken eggs aren't particularly strong. They're incredibly fragile, which is precisely why the majority of us pop the egg box open at the store to be sure they're not cracked. Archaeologists working for the Israel Antiquities Authority have made an exciting discovery. The team found an intact chicken egg dating from roughly 1000 years ago during an excavation in Yavne.

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Archaeologists discover a pregnant mummy from ancient Egypt

Archaeologists discover a pregnant mummy from ancient Egypt

Recently a group of archaeologists made a very startling discovery that began when they thought they were scanning the mummy of an ancient Egyptian male priest named Hor-Djehuty. During the scan, the images revealed what appeared to be the bones of a small foot. When completing the scan, the team confirmed that the foot belonged to a tiny fetus in the womb of the deceased and mummified mother.

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Archaeologists discover 3500-year-old terracotta pots that once held honey

Archaeologists discover 3500-year-old terracotta pots that once held honey

Archaeologists working at an excavation site in central Nigeria have discovered terracotta pottery pieces, some of which are as old as 3500 years. The pottery pieces show direct evidence that the pods once held honey, which is considered the oldest sweetener known to humanity. Researchers analyze residue found in the shards and found compounds from beeswax suggesting that waxy combs might've been heated in vessels to separate the honey.

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This nasty old skull, the oldest human genome, and a cow DNA mistake

This nasty old skull, the oldest human genome, and a cow DNA mistake

The skull you're looking at was in pieces when it was discovered. After a whole heck of a lot of work, the physical remnants were put together again for this photo. But it's the tiniest of pieces we care about today. It's the DNA this 45,000 year old skull provided that's placed it in the headlines this week.

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New technique reveals hidden detail in an ancient Etruscan painting

New technique reveals hidden detail in an ancient Etruscan painting

A group of scientists has used a new technique to uncover details in an ancient Etruscan painting. Etruscans were a group of people on the Italian peninsula about 2500 years ago before Rome came to power. A painting of the ancient people had degraded over the eons losing its once colorful detail, becoming essentially a red human-like blob.

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Ancient Egyptian painting shows an extinct goose

Ancient Egyptian painting shows an extinct goose

Researchers from the University of Queensland have examined a 4600-year-old Egyptian painting. During the examination, a rendering of a speckled goose stood out. Scientist Dr. Anthony Romilio noticed a strange and beautiful bird, unlike modern red-breasted geese that had distinct and bold colors and patterns on its face, body, breast, wings, and legs. The painting is called "Medium Geese" and was discovered in the late 1800s.

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Tiny bone fragment helps scientists learn when dogs came to the Americas

Tiny bone fragment helps scientists learn when dogs came to the Americas

Dogs and humans have lived side-by-side since the distant past. Scientists have wondered how far back the history of dogs spans in the Americas and what route dogs use to enter this part of the world. Researchers from the University at Buffalo have used a small bone fragment from a dog found in Southeast Alaska that lived in the region about 10,150 years ago to answer some of these questions.

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CT scans reveal details of how an ancient Egyptian pharaoh died

CT scans reveal details of how an ancient Egyptian pharaoh died

Researchers have recently conducted CT scans on the mummified remains of an ancient Egyptian pharaoh called Seqenenre-Taa-II. The pharaoh ruled over southern Egypt when the Hyksos occupied the country from 1650-1550 BCE. Seqenenre-Taa-II was killed while trying to wrestle his country from foreign control.

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