Apple

Apple’s Universal Control for Mac and iPad isn’t coming this year

Apple’s Universal Control for Mac and iPad isn’t coming this year

One of the key advantages Apple has over its rivals in the computing and mobile markets is near-total control over its ecosystem. Since it makes both the software and the hardware it runs on, Apple has the ability to integrate its products far better than competitors Microsoft or Google. One powerful demonstration of this is the Universal Control feature the company announced for macOS Monterey back in June. Unfortunately, it seems the feature may have been too ambitious even for Apple, as its availability quietly slid from this winter to next spring.

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Apple’s new Tracker Detect app helps Android users find hidden AirTags

Apple’s new Tracker Detect app helps Android users find hidden AirTags

Apple has released a new app that enables Android users to determine whether someone may be tracking them using an AirTag or similar compatible trackers from other companies. Called Tracker Detect, the free app scans the user's immediate area for signs of a compatible tracker that isn't near its owner, potentially highlighting a personal safety issue.

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Here’s How to Force Restart a Frozen iPhone

Here’s How to Force Restart a Frozen iPhone

There's nothing worse than being in the middle of sending a text, or opening an app, and having your iPhone freeze up on you. If this happens, you'll often find that the screen has become unresponsive and nothing you do seems to make it work again. Luckily, there are ways to fix the issue, and you can force restart your frozen iPhone to get things working again.

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How Do You Check a MacBook’s Temperature?

How Do You Check a MacBook’s Temperature?

Every time you do something on your MacBook, the hardware inside of it creates heat. Sometimes the amount of heat created is small, like when you're browsing the internet or checking your email. If you're doing more intensive things on your MacBook, though, the amount of heat created can grow quickly. Because heat is so dangerous to tech, especially the internal hardware in laptops and other smart devices, it's important to keep your MacBook's temperature in mind.

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Game-changing Apple legal ruling delayed at last minute

Game-changing Apple legal ruling delayed at last minute

Back in September, we finally saw something resembling a conclusion to the lengthy court battle between Apple and Epic. Apple largely came out on top with that one, as the court ruled in Apple's favor with one big exception: the court ruled that Apple must allow app developers to offer external payments in their games and apps. Now, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has reversed that decision, delaying the implementation of this ruling until a future date.

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Hyatt rolls out iPhone and Apple Watch room key support at some hotels

Hyatt rolls out iPhone and Apple Watch room key support at some hotels

Hyatt Hotels has announced that guests at six of its properties in the US now have the option of unlocking their rooms and common areas using an iPhone or Apple Watch instead of a physical room key. The support, which was first promised earlier this year, revolves around Apple Wallet and the ultra-wideband digital keys support that arrived with iOS 15.

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The easiest way to transfer data from an Android phone to an iPhone

The easiest way to transfer data from an Android phone to an iPhone

While many people prefer to keep using the mobile OS with which they're most familiar, there are plenty of users who aren't afraid to make the jump to something different. If you're thinking of moving from an Android smartphone to an iPhone, you're probably wondering how you're going to transfer all of your data over. The good news is that Apple makes the process easy with its "Move to iOS" tool, and here you'll learn how to use it to ensure you make the jump from iOS to Android without losing a bunch of data in the process.

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The 15 Best Apple Arcade Games of 2021

The 15 Best Apple Arcade Games of 2021

Apple Arcade, arguably the best thing to ever happen to mobile gaming, offers a huge library of ad-free, high-quality games for the iPod touch, iPhone, iPad, Mac, and Apple TV. This past year brought dozens of new games to the platform, including remastered versions of classic mobile titles and entirely new hits with excellent graphics.

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Apple Watch AssistiveTouch enables control with one-hand gestures

Apple Watch AssistiveTouch enables control with one-hand gestures

Like most consumer electronics, smartwatches have been made and designed for the majority of people. Although worn only on one wrist, the smartwatch often requires a hand from the opposite arm to navigate the user interface. Voice control can only go so far, and smartwatches, just like their smartphone cousins, are primarily touch-centric devices. Fortunately, the Apple Watch has accessibility features that makes it possible to use the smartwatch with just one hand, giving wearers almost magical abilities to control the device.

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iPhone 14 – Things we know so far

iPhone 14 – Things we know so far

Rumors about the iPhone 14 started popping up online before the iPhone 13 was announced -- and though we don't yet know what Apple has planned, there's enough info floating around to speculate. The company is rumored to be working on a foldable iPhone, at least based on certain patents, but there's no guarantee a folding model is in the pipeline at this time. In all likeliness, the next iteration of the iPhone will be called the iPhone 14 and it'll stick to the trusted form factor from previous years.

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Apple Watch Series 7 Review

Apple Watch Series 7 Review

Nobody can deny that the Apple Watch won the smartwatch wars, and the latest Apple Watch Series 7 only extends that lead. A collection of endearing enhancements rather than the all-out reinvention that some expected, 2021's version blends a bigger display with the improvements of watchOS 8, for a result that, though predictable, is no less impressive for it.

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Apple could turn Epic Games’ app tax victory into unexpected defeat

Apple could turn Epic Games’ app tax victory into unexpected defeat

For years, developers and platform makers have been waging an almost silent war over how much each can really take out of every successful purchase or subscription. That struggle was brought to light recently when Epic Games not only publicly questioned the status quo but even dared to sue giants like Apple and Google. The repercussions of those lawsuits have so far gone in favor of developers and publishers, pushing app stores to make changes to the way they do business. Apple, however, may have found a loophole that would allow it to still tax developers even if they don't use its App Store payment system.

The 70/30 Rule

Few probably remember now when or where it started, but it has become an almost de facto standard that sellers take only 70% of profits while distribution platforms take a 30% commission. That practice may have become notorious on Apple App Store and Google Play Store, but that practice has been used by many stores, both digital and physical. Most of the digital games distribution channels like Steam use it but so do physical stores like Walmart.

It has been common practice for stores to impose some tax on owners selling their products through those channels, and it makes the most sense in the context of a brick-and-mortar store. App store owners like Apple and Google also justify the cut they get by saying how it goes into improving the store platform, usually by developing stronger security measures. Not everyone, however, buys those excuses.

Epic Games, for one, has cast doubt on any innovation Google makes for the Play Store to justify its 30% share. More importantly, the famed game developer and publisher calls into question the almost arbitrary restriction that Apple places on apps distributed on its App Store. In a nutshell, all the apps there have to use Apple's first-party payment system, which also means agreeing to that 70/30 split. Given it's nearly impossible to install apps on iPhones outside of that App Store, Epic Games has argued that this requirement is, in fact, illegal.

The Verdict

Epic Games' stance found victory both in courts of law and the court of public opinion. Indirectly, it has caused many companies to review and even change their policies. Microsoft, for example, pretty much made its own Store completely open and has waived many of the restrictions developers would encounter on Steam, the App Store, and the Google Play Store.

In some territories like South Korea, Google and Apple are being legally compelled to allow third-party payment systems in apps distributed through their stores. While Apple is still appealing that new law, Google has already accepted it, but with some caveats that we'll see later.

For its part, Apple has been making changes, like offering different tiers with lower taxes depending on what's being distributed or how much an app is making. One of its biggest changes is to allow apps to link to an external site when signing up for a subscription, and soon, it will also be required to allow linking to external payment systems. It's not a clear win for developers and publishers, however, and Apple might still have the last laugh.

The Loophole

9to5Mac reports that Apple might still be getting a commission out of payments made outside of the App Store, as long as the link to the external payment system comes from an app that was installed through the App Store. That, in effect, means all the apps that are installed on iPhones and iPads.

This pretty much circumvents the spirit of Epic Games' lawsuit as well as the rulings that are being imposed against Apple. The reason why developers would want to give up the convenience of Apple Pay or Google Pay for in-app purchases is to escape that tax in the first place. The filing indicates that Apple doesn't see things the same way, at least legally speaking.

It isn't the only one either, as Google already revealed something similar last month, where it said it would take only 11% or 26% of profits when a third-party payment processor is used. The Android maker presents a list of justifications for this policy, and Apple will most likely use the same tactic if questioned. South Korean regulators are still investigating whether this is legally sound, and you can bet that Apple's injunction will be met with intense scrutiny as well.

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