ZTE

SlashGear Evening Wrap-Up: December 18, 2012

SlashGear Evening Wrap-Up: December 18, 2012

Welcome to Tuesday evening everyone. In the wake of the Instagram controversy, today we broke down the company's new Terms of Service to examine what they really mean while telling you how you can ditch Instagram for good, if that's what you want to do. We also told you about five services that would make a good replacement for Instagram, while the company's co-founder wrote a blog post in an attempt to clear some things up. Instagram controversy aside, today Google Play launched a free alternative to iTunes Match, while Twitter shot past the 200 million monthly active users mark.

Continue Reading...

ZTE Grand Era LTE revealed with dual-mode LTE

ZTE Grand Era LTE revealed with dual-mode LTE

This week the ZTE Grand Era LTE has been revealed in Hong Kong with no less than the ability to connect to two different kinds of 4G LTE mobile data. This machine works with China Mobile Hong Kong's first commercial converged TD-LTE / LTE FDD network - but there's a hitch to this dual-connecting beast. Before we get to that though, it's all about the specifications: a 1.5GHz dual-core processor and 1GB of RAM under a 4.5-inch 1280 x 720 pixel resolution display with Gorilla Glass up front for hardcore scratch resistance.

Continue Reading...

ZTE unveils the smallest 4G LTE datacard available

ZTE unveils the smallest 4G LTE datacard available

ZTE has announced the launch of its MF823, a small dongle it touts as the smallest 4G LTE data card currently available. The little white unit has already launched in Kazakhstan, of all places, and is heading for Europe and Asia "soon." The press release doesn't state a price, but if similar offerings from the company are any indication, you'll likely be looking at $200+ for the unit.

Continue Reading...

Huawei offers unrestricted access to software code in light of spying allegations

Huawei offers unrestricted access to software code in light of spying allegations

Earlier this month, Huawei was one of two Chinese manufacturers (the other being ZTE) accused of potentially spying for the Chinese government. The US House Intelligence Committee recommended that the company be avoided. Huawei retorted that the accusations are baseless, and now has offered to provide unrestricted access to its software code to prove its innocence.

Continue Reading...

White House finds no evidence of Huawei spying, source says

White House finds no evidence of Huawei spying, source says

Last week, Chinese manufacturers Huawei and ZTE were accused of potentially spying for the Chinese government, with the US House Intelligence Committee recommending that both companies be avoided, and that acquisitions and mergers be blocked in the US. A couple days later, Canada reconsidered using Huawei as part of its upcoming government communications network due to the concerns expressed by US lawmakers. Now, according to a Reuter's source, a White House review found no evidence that Huawei is spying.

Continue Reading...

SlashGear Evening Wrap-Up: October 9, 2012

SlashGear Evening Wrap-Up: October 9, 2012

Welcome to Tuesday evening, everyone. Earlier today, we found out that Samsung may be planning a Nexus 10 tablet, complete with a resolution to give the third-gen iPad a run for its money. ZTE gave its response to yesterday's allegations that it may be helping the Chinese government spy on the US, and Apple started shipping the fifth-generation iPod Touch to the first customers today. We heard that the rumored 32GB Nexus 7 variant might be replacing the 16GB model, and speaking of the Nexus 7, it received Android 4.1.2 today, which adds a much-needed landscape mode.

Continue Reading...

ZTE on hack allegations: Ban every Chinese-made device for 100% security

ZTE on hack allegations: Ban every Chinese-made device for 100% security

ZTE has hit back at a US report blackballing it as a supplier, arguing that if the House Intelligence Committee really believes Chinese hack threats are so significant, all Chinese-made hardware should be rejected. Describing itself as "China’s most transparent, independent, globally focused, publicly traded telecom company," ZTE takes no small amount of issue with the security report's suggestions that US firms should look elsewhere for safe networking, telecoms, and other hardware. In fact, ZTE alleges, its inclusion in the investigation was based solely on its prominence as a known Chinese company, not because of "any pattern of unethical or illegal behavior."

Continue Reading...

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14