wearables

Ducati gets smart systems and an inflatable jacket

Ducati gets smart systems and an inflatable jacket

Three new innovations have been revealed by Ducati this week. Two of them are new motorcycles, the third is a jacket. The most powerful of these is the Ducati 1299 Panigale, the slightly more "pedestrian" model is the Multistrada 1200, and the Ducati D|air Street Jacket/Vest. While you might be all about speed and power, Ducati is making a big-time push for safety, starting with the Panigale - dynamic suspension that adjusts based on your position - no more flips for you. Just so long as you know what you're doing, of course.

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Jawbone MOVE and UP3 trackers tipped inbound

Jawbone MOVE and UP3 trackers tipped inbound

Following closely on the heels of Microsoft's new fitness tracker Band comes word that Jawbone has a couple new -- and cheaper -- devices up its own sleeve. One of these devices is called the "MOVE", and it will cost $50 according to The Information, where the tip surfaced. The second device will reportedly be called the UP3, and it will be more expensive, priced at $180 USD, just barely undercutting the Band and proving more expensive than the company's other UP products.

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Nixie personal drone wins with Intel: coming your way soon

Nixie personal drone wins with Intel: coming your way soon

There's nothing impersonal about a little drone that attaches to your wrist then releases, flying, following you whenever you like. It's like having a personal assistant whose one purpose is watching everything you do. And streaming it. Capturing it for the whole world to see, followed by a return to your wrist to rest. We think it's an improbable device, but one that'd be amazing if realized - Intel thinks so too.

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Microsoft Band can be used to pay for Starbucks purchases

Microsoft Band can be used to pay for Starbucks purchases

The Microsoft Band activity tracker arrived with a bang last night, and in addition to its roster of features comes partnerships with several companies. Microsoft detailed these partnerships tonight, most of which are right in line with what someone buying a fitness-centric device would expect. Gold's Gym is on board, for example, providing both guided workouts and a trial gym membership for Band owners. Not all the partners are related to fitness, however, with Starbucks also dishing up goodies for those who nab Microsoft's new wearable.

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Microsoft Band wearable is official and available now

Microsoft Band wearable is official and available now

Microsoft's hotly anticipated wearable had a rocky unveiling today, popping up first via its mobile apps rather than in anything official. The company has wasted little time, however, and has officially taken the wraps off its fitness wearable: the Microsoft Band. Named such for its wristband design, no doubt, the Band is a fitness tracker with an edge, able to both keep tabs on your activities and your digital life. As the apps indicated earlier this evening, the wearable works alongside the Microsoft Health platform and in conjunction with a handful of different partners.

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Microsoft Band wearable surfaces early in app releases

Microsoft Band wearable surfaces early in app releases

For reasons unknown, a trio of Microsoft apps have arrived in the big three app stores, with the Apple version in particular showing off a wearable called "Band" that is, presumably, the device expected to launch officially in the near future. Not much is revealed by the three app listings, though an official look at the product is certainly nothing to complain about. What we do see, however, follows nicely alongside the details that have surfaced over past months through different sources, the particulars of which we have after the jump.

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Google Glass, wearables effectively banned at movies

Google Glass, wearables effectively banned at movies

In an update to their joint policy on piracy, the MPAA and NATO have agreed that any and all recording devices must now be stowed away during a movie. That’s not new, but this is the first time their policy specifically addresses wearable tech. On a “mainstream” level, those Google Glass owners will have to take their headwear off — and turn it off — during a film. The new rules also state that law enforcement will be called if they think you’re filming.

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iHealth Edge fitness tracker arrives in the US

iHealth Edge fitness tracker arrives in the US

iHealth Lab's Edge health tracker has officially launched in the United States, bringing yet another activity-centric wearable to a market that doesn't yet have enough of them. The wearable features a design similar to a smartwatch, though it can also be worn as a clip-on for times that is more convenient. As with competing products, the Edge keeps track of all sorts of health metrics, not the least of which is fitness data like calories burned and information related to one's sleep quality at night.

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Oakley Airwave 1.5 HUD goggles add Garmin camera support

Oakley Airwave 1.5 HUD goggles add Garmin camera support

Oakley's Airwave HUD goggles have been refreshed to bring in support for Garmin's VIRB Elite action camera, adding wireless pairing between the two devices for easy integration. Called the Airwave 1.5 goggles, this updated pair from Oakley uses Garmin's action cam to bring a live video feed to the HUD and doubles as a remote for controlling the camera (and it's glove friendly, Oakley promises). By utilizing the camera's GPS sensor, the goggles can also show location information, fleshing out the data available to wearers.

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Google X Nano Pill will seek cancer cells in your body

Google X Nano Pill will seek cancer cells in your body

Google's moonshot group Google X is working on a pill that, when swallowed, will seek out cancer cells in your body. It'll seek out all sorts of diseases, in fact, pushing the envelope when it comes to finding and destroying diseases at their earliest stages of development. This system would face "a much higher regulatory bar than conventional diagnostic tools," so says Chad A. Mirkin, director of the International Institute for Nanotechnology at Northwestern University.

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