wearable

Apple grabs biosensor specialists for wearables drive

Apple grabs biosensor specialists for wearables drive

Apple has added two medical wearables specialists to its team, reigniting speculation that the upcoming "iWatch" could track health issues as well as provide a wrist-worn window to your iPhone. Former medical device specialists from Vital Connect and Sano Intelligence each quietly joined Apple in December, 9 to 5 Mac spotted, bringing expertise in biosensors, minimally-invasive blood monitoring, and more.

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Intel admits CES wearables used rival chips

Intel admits CES wearables used rival chips

Intel's much-vaunted wearables shown off at CES 2014 last week didn't even necessarily use the company's own processors, it has admitted, with at least one of the gadgets using low-power chips from arch rival ARM. Some of the prototypes relied on "third-party parts" an Intel spokesperson conceded to PCMag, though declined to specify either which devices or which components; however an insider fingered the Intel Jarvis smart headset as using an ARM processor.

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Is Google Glass for drivers really safe?

Is Google Glass for drivers really safe?

Road safety while using wearable tech like Google Glass is back in the headlines, with the acquittal of one early-adopter of distracted driving charges prompting controversy over what's acceptable to use while you're behind the wheel, and what's in fact dangerous. The ruling on Thursday that Glass wearer Cecilia Abadie would not be fined for sporting the headset after being pulled over for speeding has been heralded by some "Explorers" as validation that the technology is road-worthy. Nonetheless, the question remains, is Glass really safe - not to mention legal - for drivers to use while on the road?

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Vuzix “designer sunglasses” styled Glass-rival due after 2015

Vuzix “designer sunglasses” styled Glass-rival due after 2015

Vuzix will take on Google Glass with a wearable headset resembling "designer sunglasses" rather than the somewhat clunky Borg-style tech companies are offering today, thanks to a newly announced deal with a mysterious "Tier 1" brand. The project, which Vuzix says will distill its waveguide-based eyepiece technology - expected to launch this year in industrial form - into a more consumer-friendly form, is expected to reach final design stage sometime in 2015, with a commercial launch beyond that.

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Moment Camera turns Glass into intelligent life-logger

Moment Camera turns Glass into intelligent life-logger

A new Google Glass app that turns the wearable into an intelligent life-logging camera has been released, Moment Camera, promising to automatically figure out the best times to capture a frame. The app claims to use Glass' various sensors to pick a moment when the camera is steady, the lighting is at its best, and when the potential subjects are in the best pose for a photo, and then grabs an image automatically, leaving the wearable's wearer to get on with experiencing the moment.

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Fitbit Force resulting in rash and sores for some wearers

Fitbit Force resulting in rash and sores for some wearers

Fitbit Force, a fitness tracker released late last year and soon to have a caller ID functionality, has been causing a rash and sores in some users -- in some cases, quite large ones. Reports from affected users began cropping up on the company's forums and other places across the Web, and the cause seems to have been narrowed down to an allergic reaction that can be caused by skin contact with materials near the charging port.

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Motorola talks Android, Wearables & Nest: The SlashGear Interview

Motorola talks Android, Wearables & Nest: The SlashGear Interview

It's fair to say Motorola had a big 2013, and SlashGear sat down with Steve Horowitz, senior VP of software engineering, and Steve Sinclair, VP of product marketing, at CES last week to talk wearables, contextual ecosystems, and the Internet of Things. The Google-owned company kicked off a new smartphone strategy, epitomized by the always-listening Moto X and the shockingly-affordable Moto G, arguably just as notable for what it left out of its products as what it chose to include. Meanwhile - and topical, given Google has just acquired Nest - we also talked about Motorola's place in the smart home, and where former Android project lead Horowitz sees the smartphone fitting in. Read on for the full interview.

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