virus

DNSChanger: By the Numbers

DNSChanger: By the Numbers

Over the past week or two, we've been following the DNSChanger or "Internet Doomsday" saga as the final day approached - today - and now it's time to take a head count for what's actually happened. Despite the name, this doomsday didn't actually affect very many computers at all. In fact, according the the folks at DCWG and their study of the infection over the last couple of years, we'd just reached the lowest number of infections per DNS Top Level Domain Country Code in the history of the virus.

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Internet Doomsday simple fix rundown

Internet Doomsday simple fix rundown

Believe it or not, this so-called "Internet Doomsday" you've heard about over the past week or so is a real situation - but taking care of it on your own computer is not as terrifying as the name of the day suggests. The so-called virus is called DNSChanger, and thought the fear-mongering amongst us would have all collecting water and dry food for the oncoming electrical winter, there's not actually that much to worry about. In fact, according to several internet service providers across the country, nothing significant has even appeared on their grid as the day has progressed.

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PSA: Evict DNSChanger now or lose the web Monday

PSA: Evict DNSChanger now or lose the web Monday

Today's malware has a deadline: get rid of DNSChanger now, or come Monday, July 9, you may find yourself without access to the internet altogether. Hundreds of thousands of computers around the world have been infected by the trojan, which changes DNS settings - among other things - so as to route web traffic through compromised servers. Now, the FBI is preparing to pull the plug on those servers - and many people's internet connection with them.

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FBI to kill servers supporting DNSChanger virus victims

FBI to kill servers supporting DNSChanger virus victims

Hundreds of thousands of people around the world could lose access to the Internet on July 9 when the FBI plans to kill temporary servers servicing victims of a virus. That virus is called DNSChanger, and the FBI plans to shut down the temporary DNS servers that were being used to assist victims of the Internet theft ring. Any computer that still uses the servers won't be able to go online starting July 9.

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Flame malware developed by US, Israel to slow Iranian nuclear efforts

Flame malware developed by US, Israel to slow Iranian nuclear efforts

It turns out that the massive Flame malware attack last month was a sophisticated computer virus developed by the US and Israel in an effort to sabotage Iran's nuclear program. Citing unnamed Western officials with knowledge of the effort, the Washington Post reported that the attack involved the National Security Agency, the CIA, and Israel's military as well as the use of the infamous Stuxnet virus.

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Microsoft fixes Windows flaw exploited by Flame

Microsoft fixes Windows flaw exploited by Flame

Microsoft has issued a security warning and an emergency update over the weekend that fixes a serious flaw in Windows that was exploited by the Flame malware attack last month. Flame was massive and sophisticated but luckily a targeted attack. However, the same method could be exploited in a less sophisticated implementation for a more widespread attack.

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Stuxnet virus origin confirmed: USA and Isreali governments

Stuxnet virus origin confirmed: USA and Isreali governments

This week it has been confirmed that the computer virus known as Stuxnet which spread accidentally across the global internet in 2010 was created originally by the governments of the United States and Israel to attack Iran's nuclear facilities. The worm was originally created to sabotage and shake apart Iran's nuclear program, and was part of a larger program code-named "Olympic Games." This virus became public after what's assumed to have been a rogue laptop transported the virus out to the global web.

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Iranian oil industry battled complex Flame virus last month

Iranian oil industry battled complex Flame virus last month

The Iranian oil industry reported that last month computer technicians battled a complicated computer virus. According to Iranian officials, the virus launched a data siphoning attack on key oil industry networks. To fight the complicated virus officials cut Internet links between the Iranian Oil Ministry, oil rigs, and the hub for the country's crude oil exports.

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Flame virus abilities expand with Bluetooth

Flame virus abilities expand with Bluetooth

This past week the web has been on its toes as one of the most massive cyber infections to hit the web has taken effect in areas throughout the Middle East. Today this malicious software, dreadfully named "Flame", is having its Bluetooth capabilities touted by those who would warn against it. Professor of computing at the University of Surrey in southern England Alan Woodward spoke on the next-level capabilities of this virus, noting that this software can turn an infected computer into an "industrial vacuum cleaner."

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Facebook Antivirus Marketplace offers protection

Facebook Antivirus Marketplace offers protection

There's nothing like a good reminder that computing isn't always safe, and Facebook, McAfee, Norton and others have done just that today with their new "Antivirus Marketplace." This new section of Facebook has taken the safety of your computer - not just on the web, but everywhere, to a new level with free downloads of McAfee software directly from your Facebook page. This is cross-branding at it's best, ladies and gentlemen, let's have a look.

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Flashback Trojan infection still going strong

Flashback Trojan infection still going strong

Despite various tools released by antivirus companies and a fix released by Apple itself over a week ago, the number of computers infected with the Flashback Trojan is still high. According to Russian security firm Dr. Web, there were at least 566,000 Macs still infected late last week, which is considerably higher than the number reported by Symantec and Kaspersky Labs.

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Flashback Trojan infection down, but more Mac malware on the way

Flashback Trojan infection down, but more Mac malware on the way

The number of Macs infected by the Flashback, or Flashfake, Trojan has gone down since the initial estimate of 650,000, but more malware targeting Mac users are on their way, says security researchers at Kaspersky Labs, who recently identified other SabPub variants that can be used for targeted attacks of Mac users. It appears the myth that Macs are invincible to viruses has now officially been busted.

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