USB

Google teams with FIDO’s U2F USB Security Key

Google teams with FIDO’s U2F USB Security Key

The Security Key is not something you probably have in your pocket right this minute. It’s a newer sort of verification system made in partnership with the FIDO Alliance, now working with Google and Google Chrome for an added layer of security for Google websites. With this system you’ll never need worry about being scammed by a website pretending to be Google - not even once. You will need an official U2F Security Key to make it all work to Google's satisfaction.

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USB vulnerability “fix” includes using epoxy

USB vulnerability “fix” includes using epoxy

The BadUSB vulnerability first detailed at Black Hat was just recently released to the public after a couple hackers reverse-engineered it and published on Github. That move was believed to be necessary for prodding manufacturers to come up with a solution, but it had the added effect of leaving USB users vulnerable. A patch will be difficult, it is believed, but until then a "fix" for the issue has been published that doesn't so much solve the vulnerability as it does remove certain avenues for infiltration.

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BadUSB malware reverse engineered, released to public

BadUSB malware reverse engineered, released to public

The BadUSB malware previously detailed at Black Hat isn't something you can detect, and until now, it was something you couldn't get ahold of, either. That changes thanks to hackers Adam Caudill and Brandon Wilson, who have used a bit of reverse engineering to reproduce the USB vulnerability...and they've released it to the public.

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Look out, Thunderbolt: USB Type-C and DisplayPort are coming for you

Look out, Thunderbolt: USB Type-C and DisplayPort are coming for you

USB Type-C won't just address the perennial frustration of trying to plug in your charger upside-down, but also double as a DisplayPort connection in a move that could well challenge Intel's Thunderbolt. DisplayPort Alternate Mode, announced by VESA today, will mean a single USB Type-C cable will be able to drive a 4K or higher resolution display, along with audio, USB 3.1 data, and even up to 100W of power.

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